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Running head: PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 1
Practicum Portfolio: Evidence of Accomplishments
Kim Elaine Mitchell
NUR 590B
Univ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 2
Table of Contents
Evidence of Accomplishments
1a. Annotated Bibliography – Learning Needs Assess...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 3
4a. Comprehensive Analysis of Evaluation Survey **Attached Separately
4a. Summary of Evaluation ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 4
1a. Annotated Bibliography – Learning Needs Assessments
Banta, T. and Blaich, C., (2011, January...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 5
Cicutto, L., Burns, P. and Brown, N., (2005). A training program for certified asthma
educators ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 6
Davidson, K. and Rourke, L., (2012). Surveying the orientation learning needs of clinical nursin...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 7
Francesco, L., Pistoria, M., Auerbach, A., Nardino, R., and Holmboe, E., (2005). Internal
medici...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 8
Jenkins, J. (2010, August). A multi-faceted formative assessment approach: Better
recognizing th...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 9
Mackaway, J., Winchester-Seeto, T., Coulson, D., and Harvey, M. (2011). Practical and
pedagogica...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 10
Norris, D. and Schwartz, C., (2009). Needs assessments: An integrated assignment in civic
servi...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 11
important to the learning process and the implementation of scenarios that provide
students wit...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 12
1b. Annotated Bibliography – Employee Wellness Programs
Barlow, R. and Weber, D., (2012). Welln...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 13
reduce costs. When personal health care is promoted, a win/win situation arises
for the employe...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 14
improve productivity, reduce absenteeism, and save on health care costs. As
wellness moves beyo...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 15
In this study initial health-behavior change was evaluated among employees who
voluntarily part...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 16
Harte, K., Mahieu, K., Mallett, D., Norville, J., and Vanderwerf, S., (2011) Absence
management...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 17
steps in implementing a worksite health promotion program are discusses with
examples given rel...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 18
of heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and cancer; accounting for nearly 20% of
deaths each ye...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 19
corporations continues to effect the US economy. This study was conducted to
examine the effect...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 20
Terry, P., Fowles, J., and Harvey, L., (2010). Employee engagement factors that affect
enrollme...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 21
1c. Summary of Regulations & Standards and Policies & Procedures
Discussed applicable policies ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 22
1d. Summary of Mentor Feedback
Discussed learning needs assessment with mentor, Deborah William...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 23
1e. List of Prioritized Needs
Needs for improvement:
 Activity and Fitness
 Annual health scr...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 24
1f. Summary of Mentor Feedback
Learning needs assessment surveys sent to mentor and results rev...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 25
2a. Annotated Bibliography – Learning Styles & Instructional Design
Baird, D. and Fisher, M., (...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 26
Bishop, C. and Foster, C., (2011). Thinking styles: maximizing online supported learning. J.
Ed...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 27
must change to accommodate the different learning styles regardless of ethnicity,
learner’s age...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 28
students outcomes, how students perceptions of their own learning outcomes were
improved, and i...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 29
of merchandise. This paper includes results on 1) support system for older adults
2) Learning s...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 30
implementing metadata to identify preferred learning styles and specified learning
objectives. ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 31
skills. Education provides many valuable and effective opportunities to educate
teachers while ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 32
attitudes include social issues, achievement, good conduct, and teamwork. This
generation of mi...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 33
2b. Narrative Review of Three Existing Employee Wellness Programs
A review was completed of thr...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 34
could be familiar with policies, procedures, and equipment. These members were also
encouraged ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 35
References
Harter, C. and Klein, K., (2003). Get yourself centered: A healthy dose of fitness c...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 36
2c. Components of Developed Plan
1) Participant Objectives
At the end of this power point prese...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 37
2c. Components of Developed Plan
2) Content Outline
Presentation Purpose
Participant Objectives...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 38
 If you are doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say
more than a few wor...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 39
 Who Gets Breast Cancer?
 Women
 Men
 Risk Factors
 Annual Health Screenings
 Symptoms of...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 40
 Recommendations
 Vision
 Hearing
**If you are having problems or symptoms effecting your ey...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 41
 Educational Programs
 Avoiding a Heart Attack
 Don’t smoke, avoid tobacco products
 Mainta...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 42
 Other causes
 Cardiomyopathy
 Heart valve disease
 Arrhythmias
 Congenital heart defects
...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 43
 Chronic Back and Neck Pain
 Risk Factors
 Relieving Back/Neck Pain
 Back Saving Tips
 Chr...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 44
 Types of Diabetes
 Type 1
 Defined
 Symptoms
 Types of Diabetes
 Type 2
 Defined
 Symp...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 45
 Diabetes
 Complications
 Statistics
 Educational Programs
 Cost of Diabetes
 Reduce Your...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 46
 Areas of Interest
 Mammograms
 Defined
 Recommendations
 Benefits of Screening mammograms...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 47
2d. Summary of Mentor Feedback
PowerPoint presentation draft was emailed to mentor for input. M...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 48
3a. Summary of Arrangements & Process for Implementation
Once the material was decided by revie...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 49
3b. Summary of Presentation Experience
PowerPoint presentation was given to both groups as prev...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 50
3b. Summary of Mentor Feedback
Mentor and I were in agreement the evaluation surveys overall we...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 51
4a. Summary of Evaluation Survey
Eleven participants from the original group of 15 who took the...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 52
4b. Summary of Mentor Feedback
My mentor and I are in agreement the overall evaluation surveys ...
PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 53
4b. Mentor’s Final Evaluation of Overall Practicum Achievements
The topic of this Practicum is ...
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Portfolio - "Encouraging Better Employee Health Practices" - by Kim Mitchell, MSN, MBA/HCM, RN

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Portfolio containing entire research involved in preparing this assignment on "Encouraging Better Employee Health Practices." Includes: Bibliographies, Learning Needs Surveys, Evaluation Surveys, Brochure, and Journal.

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Portfolio - "Encouraging Better Employee Health Practices" - by Kim Mitchell, MSN, MBA/HCM, RN

  1. 1. Running head: PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 1 Practicum Portfolio: Evidence of Accomplishments Kim Elaine Mitchell NUR 590B University of Phoenix Online Terri Day April 29, 2013
  2. 2. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 2 Table of Contents Evidence of Accomplishments 1a. Annotated Bibliography – Learning Needs Assessments 4 1b. Annotated Bibliography – Employee Wellness Programs 12 1c. Summary of Regulations & Standards and Policies & Procedures 21 1d. Learning Needs Assessment (LNA) **Attached Separately 1d. Summary of Mentor Feedback 22 1e. Comprehensive Analysis of LNA (Excel Spreadsheet) **Attached Separately 1e. List of Prioritized Needs 23 1f. Summary of Mentor Feedback 24 2a. Annotated Bibliography – Learning Styles & Instructional Design 25 2b. Narrative Review of Three Existing Employee Wellness Programs 33 2c. Components of Developed Plan 1) Participant Objectives 34 2) Content Outline 35 3) Teaching Strategies a) Power Point Presentation **Attached Separately b) Program Brochure **Attached Separately 4) Evaluation Tool **Attached Separately 2d. Summary of Mentor Feedback 45 3a. Summary of Arrangements & Process for Implementation 46 3b. Summary of Presentation Experience 47 3b. Summary of Mentor Feedback 48
  3. 3. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 3 4a. Comprehensive Analysis of Evaluation Survey **Attached Separately 4a. Summary of Evaluation Survey 49 4b. Summary of Mentor Feedback 50 4b. Mentor’s Final Evaluation of Overall Practicum Achievements 51
  4. 4. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 4 1a. Annotated Bibliography – Learning Needs Assessments Banta, T. and Blaich, C., (2011, January/February). Closing the assessment loop. Change, 22-27. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This article provides descriptions of conditions that make closing the assessment loop difficult. The article continues to discuss why faculty engaged in assessment is important and the difficulties faced by mandates on assessment and testing. A way of addressing these concerns is through the concept of double-loop learning in assessment – a mechanism for increasing the chance that these assessments will contribute to improved learning. Many place blame on the fact too few faculty are closing the loop – not looking closely enough at findings of appropriate improvements. Bourke, R., Mentis, M., and Todd, L., (2011). Visibly learning: Teachers’ assessment practices for students with high and very high needs. International Journal of Inclusive Education, 15(4), 405-419. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. In this paper teachers’ assessment strategies who work with special educational needs students are discussed. The survey explored practices used in assessment, reasons for using these approaches, the role of the individual performing the assessment, and the levels of confidence in assessing students relating to learning. Narrative assessment and learning stories were a couple of the approaches used by some teachers in school-based settings. These are strategies where parents, teachers, teacher-aides, and students discuss learning.
  5. 5. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 5 Cicutto, L., Burns, P. and Brown, N., (2005). A training program for certified asthma educators assessing performance. Journal of Asthma, 42, 561-565. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This study’s purpose was to determine a method to evaluate participants and determine if certain characteristics influenced the success of the participants’. Somewhat strong relationships were discovered within the three standardized patient encounters. Despite this, there were no correlations between the individuals’ scores on the written asthma or educational theory examination and the practice skill assessment scores. This study helped determine the educator training program represents a wide range of disciplines, practice settings, and experience. It is important to assess both written knowledge and practice assessments to evaluate participants. Cunningham, D. and Kelly, D. (2005). The evaluation of a multi-professional learning needs assessment tool. Education for Primary Care, 16, 547-555. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Recent government publications have drawn attention to the need for teams to learn together. Organizing committees of such design may discover needs assessment are a complicated and time-consuming process. A need exists to determine specific tools to help identify learning needs and the evaluation of such a tool. The overall evaluation of this assessment was positive with a large number of professionals using this tool to identify their learning needs.
  6. 6. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 6 Davidson, K. and Rourke, L., (2012). Surveying the orientation learning needs of clinical nursing instructors. International Journal of Nursing Education Scholarship, 9(1), 1-11. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This study’s purpose was to describe the knowledge and skills nurses need to be successful clinical instructors. To measure the orientation learning needs of new part-time clinical faculty, a learning needs assessment was conducted. A current learning needs instrument was modified and administered online. With these results, necessary content for an orientation workshop course was outlined. It was followed by an online orientation course. Further research is needed to evaluate the outcomes of clinical instructor orientation, to determine if participants have acquired the knowledge and skills needed to facilitate student learning in the clinical setting. Dinur, A. and Sherman, H., (2009). Incorporating outcomes assessment and rubrics into case instruction. Institute of Behavioral and Applied Management, 291-311. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Outcomes Assessment (OA) has become apparent as the systematic mechanism for academic establishments to demonstrate their vitality as institutions creating and disseminating knowledge. Proper implementation of outcomes assessment plans has been of concern to postsecondary academic institutions. These institutions must demonstrate they have achieved their goals and objectives. This study used a before and after study for using grading rubrics, an instrument developed through outcomes assessment programs to analyze students’ oral and written analysis of business cases.
  7. 7. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 7 Francesco, L., Pistoria, M., Auerbach, A., Nardino, R., and Holmboe, E., (2005). Internal medicine training in the inpatient setting: A review of published educational interventions. Journal of General Internal Medicine, 20, 1173-1180. Retrieved form University of Phoenix Library. Education in the inpatient setting is affected by many changes and factors. Many academic institutions are seeking further inpatient training changes. This paper reviews current literature on specific internal medicine inpatient educational interventions and offers recommendations for improving the training in this setting. The necessity of high quality research in the internal medicine inpatient setting highlights the urgent need to define and study what constitutes an effective inpatient curriculum. Hauer, J. and Quill, T., (2011). Educational needs assessment, development of learning objectives, and choosing a teaching approach. Journal of Palliative Medicine, 14(4), 503-508. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Components involved with determining and providing necessary educational experiences is discussed. These steps apply to a variety of educational needs and settings including training programs for curriculum development, clinical staff development, and identifying learning needs throughout practice. Three components are covered in this article: needs assessment, development of learning objectives, and choosing a teaching approach. Understanding the integral components involved with learning and curriculum development ultimately lead to improvement of the experiences of both learners and educators.
  8. 8. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 8 Jenkins, J. (2010, August). A multi-faceted formative assessment approach: Better recognizing the learning needs of students. Assessment & Evaluation in Higher Education, 35(5), 565-576. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The study aims to create a multi-faceted formative assessment approach to enable the engagement of students in the assessment process. The effectiveness of the assessment approach was assessed by analyzing written student feedback that facilitated analysis of student perceptions of the assessment process. In this article an argument is made for formative assessment to be more widely followed, and made more effective in encouraging learning. More recognition must be granted to the strategies that can be assumed to facilitate the uptake of formative assessments. Kielsmeier, J., Scales, P., Neal, R., and Neal, M., (2004). Community service and service- learning in public schools. Reclaiming Children and Youth, 13(3), 138-143. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. In this paper a National Youth Leadership Council was commissioned to conduct a national study of service-learning in elementary, middle, and high schools. The study acknowledges the potential of service – learning as a strategy for engaging young people in civic and community life while also promoting healthy development, and strengthening their education. It reveals a core of school leaders who believe strongly in the importance and power of service-learning even while facing pressures to focus time and effort in other areas.
  9. 9. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 9 Mackaway, J., Winchester-Seeto, T., Coulson, D., and Harvey, M. (2011). Practical and pedagogical aspects of learning: The LTP assessment design framework. Journal of University Teaching & Learning Practice, 8(3), 1-16. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The purpose of this article was to determine the many issues, focusing on matters that learning through participation (LTP) practitioners, especially those new to LTP, need to consider in designing assessments. The key themes and issues were used to inform the development of resources to support those responsible for LTP assessment design. Similarities and differences for the various forms of LTP were also noted. Negley, K., Ness, S., Fee-Schroeder, K., Kokal, J., and Voll, J. (2009, January). Building a collaborative nursing practice to promote patient education: An inpatient and outpatient partnership. Leadership & Professional Development, 36(1), 19-23. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. A team was formed to assist in identifying and implementing possible solutions to improve patient education involving communication issues. Collaboration among nurses of specific specialties or settings can be challenging. Oncology nurses must continue to discover opportunities that foster collaborative relationships among practice settings. In this article consideration is made in the importance of establishing a pilot project that would enable evaluation of the results of the collaborative efforts. Development of the project was completed with the main objective of building a collaborative nursing practice to promote education between the inpatient and outpatient areas.
  10. 10. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 10 Norris, D. and Schwartz, C., (2009). Needs assessments: An integrated assignment in civic service. Journal of Teaching in Social Work, 29, 373-382. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. In this article an undergraduate social work program developed a service learning experience in partnership with a local United Way organization to complete a community needs assessment project. Needs assessments conducted by social work students resulted in particular groups of community citizens receiving certain services from agencies who received funding from United Way. Evidence obtained from the students who participated in this experience indicates that two important learning outcomes were achieved; a heightened awareness of the local community’s resource system and a sense of connection to the local community, along with the enhancement of students ‘self-esteem and increased self- confidence in their abilities. Parker, B. and Myrick, F., (2010). Transformative learning as a context for human patient simulation. Journal of Nursing Education, 49(6), 326-332. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This article focuses on empowering novice nurses to become autonomous thinkers with the ability to cope with the many challenges of modern day practice. Patient simulation is a powerful educational tool suited for the transformation of individual meaning schemes. The purpose of this article is to examine the role of clinical scenarios using human patient simulation to promote transformative learning events in undergraduate nursing education. The articles focus is on the role of debriefing in the promotion of the critical reflection and social discourse
  11. 11. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 11 important to the learning process and the implementation of scenarios that provide students with dilemmas for perspective transformation. Policy, tools, training, and expectation prompt assessment of learning needs. (2008, June). Patient Education Management, 15(6), 61-72. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This article identified areas of patient education in which surveyors from The Joint Commission most frequently found a need for improvement. One area is teaching from a learning needs assessment. To approach this issue, medical institutions tools are examined to make sure staff members are compliant. Barriers to compliance are also discussed and how to overcome them. While tools are beneficial, providing assessment questions and teaching plan templates are usually not enough to secure high compliance. This is an important reason patient education managers make sure staff training is part of the equation.
  12. 12. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 12 1b. Annotated Bibliography – Employee Wellness Programs Barlow, R. and Weber, D., (2012). Wellness and return on investment: Determining the value of wellness programs. Benefits Quarterly. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Recent advances can give companies a solid set of return on investment measurements on health improvement programs, provided they are willing to invest in both wellness programs and measurement efforts that can measure accurately those programs’ merit. Choosing the right methodology will depend on the health improvement programs being evaluated, data, and resources available, and the degree of precision desired by management. The authors discuss the different measurement methodologies and various measurement considerations. Using several methods and multiple iterations under varying sets of assumptions is often useful, not only for calculating return on investment but also for providing companies a framework for continual program tracking and improvement. Benavides, A., and David, H., (2010). Local government wellness programs: A viable option to decrease healthcare costs and improve productivity. Public Personnel Management, 39(4), 291-306. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. In an effort to reduce the rising costs of health care, many local governments are seeking alternative strategies to help with the problem. Wellness programs may be one solution to help curb these climbing health care costs. Wellness programs have proven to be a cost-effective way to get a return on investment. The article argues that wellness programs have been repackaged as a positive alternative to
  13. 13. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 13 reduce costs. When personal health care is promoted, a win/win situation arises for the employee and they become productive stewards of tax payer dollars. Berry, L. and Mairabito, A., (2011, April). Partnering for prevention with workplace health promotion programs. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 86(4), 335-337. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Progressive, well-managed companies are eager to become partners with the medical community in promoting prevention. Organizations need medically trained staff to help design company health promotion strategies. Medical personnel are needed to staff company medical clinics, either as employees or through direct contracting, The classic health belief model proposes behavioral changes require belief that the product will be beneficial and cost effective. Behavior changes need to provide confidence that the change is possible, and an incentive to take action. Employers are in a good position to help decrease or eliminate barriers to change. Keeping workers healthy helps boost productivity by decreasing absenteeism and presenteeism. Bolch, M., (2012, July/August). Wellness work: Financial Executive, 26-29. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Well-designed wellness programs are proving to help not only employee waistlines but also company bottom lines. Some innovative programs working include health risk assessments, biometric screenings, weight loss challenges, lunch-and-learns, and healthy options in the break room vending machines. Employers focusing on healthier lifestyles certainly sounds like a logical way to
  14. 14. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 14 improve productivity, reduce absenteeism, and save on health care costs. As wellness moves beyond a warm and fuzzy benefit to one that has great potential to lower employee health risks and save money, the question of how to measure success becomes vital. Brewer, P., Gallo, A., and Smith, M., (2010, May). Getting fit with corporate wellness programs. Strategic Finance, 27-33. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Creating incentives rewarding wellness-oriented behavior is another motivator. Financial incentives include immediate cash rewards or providing future cash rewards to employees who achieve wellness related goals. Gain sharing arrangements, fringe-benefit rewards, and life insurance payouts are just a few of the other financial incentives that can be offered. Nonfinancial rewards include free merchandise, days off from work, and special privileges that may include a convenient parking space, travel opportunities, and massage therapy. Colkesen, E., Niessen, M., Peek, N., Vosbergen, S., Kraaijenhagen, R., Van Kalken, C., Tijssen, J., and Peters, R., (2011). Initiation of health-behavior change among employees participating in a web-based health risk assessment with tailored feedback. Journal of Occupational medicine and Toxicology, 6(5), 1-7. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Primary prevention programs at the worksite can improve employee health and reduce the burden of cardiovascular disease. Programs, including a web-based health risk assessment (HRA) with individualized feedback, have advantages of increasing awareness of risk while enhancing initiation of health-behavior change.
  15. 15. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 15 In this study initial health-behavior change was evaluated among employees who voluntarily participated in an HRA program. Self-reported initiation of health- behavior change was more frequent among those at high risk for cardiovascular disease. Employees reported satisfaction with the HRA, which was positively associated with a change in health behavior. These findings show voluntary participation has a motivating effect on those in greatest need of health-behavior change and may be a valuable component of workplace health promotion programs. DeGroot, T. and Kiker, S., (2003). A meta-analysis of the non-monetary effects of employee health management programs. Human Resource Management, 42(1), 53-69. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The purpose of this study was to review the literature on employee health management programs. The authors explore the history and characteristics of systematic organizational efforts to help improve workforce health and well-being. The authors searched the likely effects of these programs on organizational outcomes such as employee performance, satisfaction, absenteeism, and voluntary turnover. The findings support that voluntary general-focus programs are unrelated to job performance, and voluntary programs are negatively related to absenteeism, but effects on absenteeism wane when the program, is not voluntary. These results question the ability of employee health management programs to provide desired behavioral changes in employees, changes organizations seek to maximize such as increased performance.
  16. 16. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 16 Harte, K., Mahieu, K., Mallett, D., Norville, J., and Vanderwerf, S., (2011) Absence management and presenteeism: Improving workplace productivity – It isn’t about reducing absence. Benefits Quarterly, 13-26. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Employers must get more aggressive in their health and productivity strategies. Key aspects of a comprehensive long-term health and productivity strategic vision were discussed. An establishment can use these aspects of help address immediate issues while developing broader strategies. The target areas include the perspective of data management, absence program design and management, employee health and wellness, and behavioral health. In this study, comprehensive strategies includes data analysis across health and lost-time programs, absence policies that meet today’s needs for both employer and employee, health and wellness programs targeting modifiable health behaviors, and absence program administration that is aligned to operational goals. Ickes, M. and Sharma, M., (2009). Worksite health promotion: A practical strategy for obesity prevention. American Journal of Health Studies, 24(3), 343-352. Obesity has become a major public health problem. One group identified as at- risk is employees at worksites. Behavioral and environmental factors have played a large role in obesity, and have been stressed to be the greatest areas for prevention efforts. Benefits of worksite wellness programs include cost containment, higher productivity, reduced absenteeism, reduced injuries, a decline in worker’s compensation/disability, and an increase in employee morale. Ten
  17. 17. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 17 steps in implementing a worksite health promotion program are discusses with examples given related to obesity prevention. Loeppke, R., Nicholson, S., Taitel, M., Sweeney, M., Haufle, V., and Kessler, R., (2008). The impact of an integrated population health enhancement and disease management program on employee health risk, health conditions, and productivity. Population Health Management, 11(6). Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This study evaluated the impact of an integrated health enhancement program on employee health conditions, risks, and productivity. These results were compared to another set of employees not offered participation in health enhancement programs. The results reflected an active employee had a significant reduction in health risks with participation in a health program. The most noticeable changes in health risk were reduction in those employees with high cholesterol, an overall improvement in diet, a decrease in alcohol use, more controlled high blood pressure, improved stress management, increase in exercise, decrease in smokers, and a drop in obesity rates. Overall, this study provides evidence that health enhancement has a positive impact on employees’ health risk and productivity. Madison, K., Volpp, K., and Halpern, S., (2011). The law, policy, and ethics of employers’ use of financial incentives to improve health. Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics, 450-468. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Individuals can often take steps to preserve or improve their own health. A widespread failure to adopt healthy behaviors can significantly erode public health while increasing health care costs. Smoking, for instance, increases the risk
  18. 18. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 18 of heart disease, stroke, lung disease, and cancer; accounting for nearly 20% of deaths each year in the United States. Public health officials, health care providers, health insurers, and others historically have used many techniques to encourage individuals to improve their own health. In recent years, however; one particular mechanism for health improvement has attracted increasing attention: financial incentives. Neely, M., (2012). Wellness strategies for smaller business. Benefits Quarterly, 16-19. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The economy and rising health care costs have caused many smaller businesses to focus on core business strategies to keep the doors open and the business going. This article highlights one company’s approach to wellness and the results of the company’s programs. Although it is difficult to measure the dollars saved by avoiding a serious health condition or the positive change in productivity from an employee who is no longer struggling with health or pain issues, these savings can be significant. Phillips, J., (2009). Using an ounce of prevention: Does it reduce health care expenditures and reap pounds of profits? A study of the financial impact of wellness and health risk screening programs. Journal of Health Care Finance, 36(2), 1-12. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Health care expenditures in the United States are out of control and continue to grow at alarming rates. Because private industry bares a significant burden of paying these rising health care costs, the ever-increasing sum paid by these
  19. 19. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 19 corporations continues to effect the US economy. This study was conducted to examine the effectiveness of one approach to control rising health care costs and contain corporate financial responsibility. Individual health care costs were gathered through an online survey from health care benefit administrators. Information about wellness and health risk screening programs was researched and the related responses were used to determine if there was a correlation between health care costs and health prevention programs. Robroek, S., Van Lenthe, F., Van Empelen, P., and Burdorf, A., (2009, May). Determinants of participation in worksite health promotion programs: a systematic review. International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, 6(26), 1-12. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The workplace has been identified as a promising setting for health promotion, and many onsite health promotion programs have been implemented in the past years. Most research has focused on these interventions and how effective they are. This systematic review inspects initial participation in worksite health promotion programs, the underlying reason for participation, and characteristics of the program that may influence participation levels. Few studies evaluate the influence of health, lifestyle, and work related factors on participation. This study does offer some strategies that can be used to increase participation levels. The review highlights further insight is needed to develop interventional programs with the ability to reach many employees.
  20. 20. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 20 Terry, P., Fowles, J., and Harvey, L., (2010). Employee engagement factors that affect enrollment compared with retention in two coaching programs – the activate study. Population Health Management, 13(3), 115-122. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. In this article enrollment and retention results from randomized trials are discussed that tests the differences between a traditional worksite health promotion program and an activated consumer program on health behaviors and health status. Enrollment of high risk employees into the individualized coaching programs varied by industry type, smoking status, and patient activation. These findings suggest one set of strategies may be needed to encourage program enrollment while another set of strategies is used to encourage participation.
  21. 21. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 21 1c. Summary of Regulations & Standards and Policies & Procedures Discussed applicable policies with Amy Thalmueller, RN, COHN. Copies of these policies were provided to turn in for Evidence of Accomplishment (EOA). Baxter Healthcare Corporation is on the right track. According to Baxter policy 19.8 on Health Promotion, the company is a smoke-free environment as of 2011. Baxter involves current employees in promoting health and wellness in the workplace by having Wellness Ambassadors. These are Baxter employees who volunteer to attend necessary in-services and training to help spread the news to other employees. Baxter is ahead of the game because they realize “healthy and productive employees are a company’s most valuable asset” (Baxter Policy 19.8 Health Promotion, 2010, p. 1). Baxter has a long-term program in place called BeWell@Baxter. This is a commitment by Baxter to promote health, reduce risk factors, and help with disease control. These three areas of focus are:  Staying Well  Taking Action  Dealing with Illness (Baxter Policy 19.8 Health Promotion, 2010). Some of the educational offerings available to Baxter employees include:  Know Your Numbers – comprehensive blood screening  Mammograms – offered on-site to employees  Flu-shots  Healthy Eating Month  Exercise Challenge Month  Triple Holiday Challenge (Baxter Policy 19.8 Health Promotion, 2010).
  22. 22. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 22 1d. Summary of Mentor Feedback Discussed learning needs assessment with mentor, Deborah Williams, RN, MSN, MBA/HA. Mentor reinforced the content and setup of the learning needs assessment survey is appropriate for the practicum topic chosen and should provide an abundance of useful information to base the PowerPoint presentation and brochure on. The assessment will be conducted using a Rating/Likert-type survey. Mentor advised not to put a place for a name on the surveys because they should be anonymous, but to include an area for the participants to list demographic information. Survey revisions were made based on mentor’s recommendations. Mentor also highlighted to remember anything done for this practicum will need to have Evidence of Accomplishment submitted for proof. Final approval was given by mentor to proceed with the survey to the selected employees.
  23. 23. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 23 1e. List of Prioritized Needs Needs for improvement:  Activity and Fitness  Annual health screenings  EKG’s  Pap smears  Breast exams  Prostate exams  Dental, vision, and hearing  Educational programs  Heart disease (cholesterol, diabetes, arrhythmia, heart attack, heart failure, high blood pressure)  Cancer prevention  Chronic pain  CVA prevention  Diabetes  Stress management  Nutrition: food pyramid-servings, healthy eating  Areas of interest:  Mammograms  Weight management  Self-help/First-aid
  24. 24. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 24 1f. Summary of Mentor Feedback Learning needs assessment surveys sent to mentor and results reviewed including demographic data and list of priorities (needs for improvement) as previously listed. Discussed the important aspects to include in the PowerPoint presentation such as demographics and main areas brought out in the learning needs assessment. Mentor reminded me to include a disclaimer about any pictures used in the presentation or brochure. Mentor and I reviewed the current Baxter policies in effect and health promotion activities already in place. Discussed how this would be good information to include in the workplace brochure. This will provide important information, serve as an easy reference at the employees’ fingertips.
  25. 25. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 25 2a. Annotated Bibliography – Learning Styles & Instructional Design Baird, D. and Fisher, M., (2005-2006). Neomillennial user experience design strategies: Utilizing social networking media to support “always on” learning styles. J. Educational Technology Systems, 34(1), 5-32. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Today’s students have different learning styles and expectations. Today’s generation has been brought up in a world of Internet, instant messaging, and interactive media. A benefit this generation has from the “always on” digital technology is creating their own learning path, self-paced and customized for them. This includes many forms of interactive and social media tools. This study explores the role emerging social media plays in the formation of learning communities, facilitation of student involvement, and the enhancement of students experience in both asynchronous and synchronous learning settings. This study was designed to identify social networking resources to facilitate course design and help with instruction delivery. Bishka, A., (2010, November/December). Learning styles fray: Brilliant or batty? Performance Improvement, 49(10), 9-13. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. No empirical evidence has been discovered to show an improvement in learning and attention by matching instruction and learner styles. The study enforces the basic knowledge that no two learners are alike. Learners have their own preferences and styles. These learners’ environments are influenced by attitudes toward learning and interact with the age, race, class, and gender of the learner. These learners would be better served if the limited resources are devoted to sound educational practices that have been proven scientifically.
  26. 26. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 26 Bishop, C. and Foster, C., (2011). Thinking styles: maximizing online supported learning. J. Educational Computing Research, 44(2), 121-139. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. As the demand for proficient teachers increase in inner cities and rural areas, university programs provided through Internet education are expanding to meet this need. This study targets the different thinking styles of online learners enrolled in post baccalaureate teacher education program. These students took the Sternberg-Wagner Thinking Styles Inventory to assist in meeting these individual learning needs. These same students’ grades were studied to determine the relationship, if any, to student thinking styles. The study did not reveal any thinking style clusters. This led researchers to concluding all profiles of thinking styles need to be considered to maximize student learning. Costa, D., (2001). Current trends in learning styles. The Florida Communication Journal, 29(2), 66-74. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This study focuses on learning styles among diverse learners. Current learning style trends reflect educational diversity. Many theorists believe learning styles form during childhood and remain unchanged throughout adulthood while others believe learning styles change with experiences encountered over time. . More females are pursuing higher education while an increased number of adults are seeking to gain higher knowledge through education. The way education is delivered is changing along with technology. With the advancing technology and increase demand for higher education, research has focused more on design and implementation of courses. Regardless of the learning style, teaching strategies
  27. 27. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 27 must change to accommodate the different learning styles regardless of ethnicity, learner’s age, or mode of delivery. Daisley, R., (2011, February). Considering personality type in adult learning: Using the Myers- Briggs type indicator in instructor preparation at pricewaterhousecoopers. Performance Improvement, 50(2), 15-24. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The usefulness of using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) as a framework for instructor development in a professional services training environment is discussed. The MBTI is consistent with many adult learning theories and addresses reliability, validity, and applicability to the training environment. Instructors are the backbone of a training course and can either make or break the training success. Therefore, identifying and properly training course instructors is imperative to having a successful training course to promote organizational performance. Dunn, R., Honigsfeld, A., Doolan, L., Bostrom, L., Russo, K., Schiering, M., Suh, B., and Tenedero, H., (2009, January/February). Impact of learning-style instructional strategies on students’ achievement and attitudes: perceptions of educators in diverse institutions. The Clearing House, 82(3), 135-140. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Many years prior to the adoption of active or engaged learning by education departments, researchers of the different learning styles determined children learn much more and learn more easily while actively involved and not just passive listening. One area this study explored was how learning styles impact teaching syllabi, values, and teaching practices and whether design improved instruction or
  28. 28. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 28 students outcomes, how students perceptions of their own learning outcomes were improved, and if the education profession is enriched. Elias, T., (2010, May). Universal instructional design principles for moodle. International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 11(2), 110-124. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The purpose of this paper is to review principles of universal instructional design (UID) and determine how useful distance education (DE) is to both online instructors and instructional designers. Once the UIDs are identified, they are utilized to assess availability of the online platform (MoodleTM) and accessibility. Moodle end-users have access to a multitude of plug-in modules, but only a few of these modules were available for sample course analysis. This paper includes several recommendation options to help advance online distance education accessibility for learners from all backgrounds, including diverse abilities, needs, and disabilities. Jones, A., (2011).The learning and support preferences of older adults with information and communication technologies. The International Journal of Technology, Knowledge, and Society, 7(1), 149-164. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. Understanding of information and communication technologies (ICTs) can help promote independence, autonomy, and quality of life for older adults. This is achieved through successful practice, research, and policies. Opportunities are opened through learning and use of ICTs by allowing older adults to examine, identify, and grasp competent learning methods. This offers older adults further opportunity to engage in social media with others and the ease of online ordering
  29. 29. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 29 of merchandise. This paper includes results on 1) support system for older adults 2) Learning support mechanisms that may promote older adults involvement with ICTs. LeNoue, M., Hall, T., and Eighmy, M., (2011). Adult education and the social media revolution. Adult Learning, 4-11. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. With the advent of social media and advances in technology, the learning process must change to meet the needs of the diverse student body. This advanced technology allows student learners to customize their learning process. More courses and degrees are available through Internet-based portals and open the learner to an abundance of Internet sites and material. The best designed courses will offer variety through mixing formal and informal information-based learning models. Developing social software and empowering student learners and teachers to embrace these tools will enable both to benefit from the immeasurable resource environment. Mustaro, P. and Silveira, I., (2006). Learning objects: Adaptive retrieval through learning styles. Interdisciplinary Journal of Knowledge and Leaning Objects, 2, 35-46. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This study sets out to increase learning abilities and make these learning abilities customizable and personal. The learner must develop specific skills. Learning these specific skills are important to society’s evolution. This requires certain strategies to recognize adult learning styles for specific learning context. Using the theoretical references of Felder, Kolb, and Gardner, the study proposes
  30. 30. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 30 implementing metadata to identify preferred learning styles and specified learning objectives. This will result in improvement of learning objects effectiveness. Overbaugh, R. and ShinYi, L., (2006). Student characteristics, sense of community, and cognitive achievement in web-based and lab-based learning environments. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 39(2), 205-223. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The purpose of this study was to determine what effects of learning styles and orientation have on sense of community and cognitive achievement in a Web and lab-based university format. Although higher scores were achieved by students in Web-based classes at “remembering and understanding” levels, but this was not the case in the “applying and analyzing” levels. Further investigation revealed introvert students scored higher in Web-based sections, while lab-based sections saw higher scores among extroverts. Web-based students also scored higher in two of the three section on “sense of community.” Rakap, S., (2010, April). Impacts of learning styles and computer skills on adult student’ learning online. The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 9(2), 108-115. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The purpose of this study was to investigate what influences learning styles, previous computer skills, and experience with online courses had on knowledge retention of adult learners in a special education web-based course. The study results reflect learning styles had direct effect on adult learners’ knowledge retention and a positive relationship between student success and prior computer
  31. 31. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 31 skills. Education provides many valuable and effective opportunities to educate teachers while proving to be a long-term challenge as well. Shinkareva, O. and Benson, A., (2007, December). The relationship between adult students’ instructional technology competency and self-directed learning ability in an online course. Human Resource Development International, 10(4), 417-435. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This research study focused on any relationship between competency of instructional technology (IT) and self-directed learning (SDL) in adult students’. Motivation and learning strategies were also researched. Surveys were conducted of 198 professionals continuing their education through online course at Midwest State University. These findings show a direct correlation between the ability for SDL and IT competency when students presented with an above average SDL ability. The study further discovers motivation is an integral part for individual learning with online courses remiss SDL ability. Students exhibiting increased levels of SDL ability are more likely to present with increased levels of self- efficacy for learning and a higher level of effort regulation. Worley, K., (2011). Educating college students of the net generation. Adult Learning, 31-39. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. This study focused on the need to provide a positive, active learning environment to enhance student learning and ensure needs of adult learners are met. “Generational diversity” involves learning styles and characteristics. Millennials, for instance, are youth with a can-do attitude and have developed new attitudes and habits older generations have never linked to young people. These habits and
  32. 32. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 32 attitudes include social issues, achievement, good conduct, and teamwork. This generation of millennials have a direct influence on future retail sales, fashion, advertising, leadership, and so on. Higher education will also be impacted by this generation, they are pressured to become college graduates and succeed in the business world. Yilmaz-Soylu, M. and Akkoyunlu, B., (2002). The effect of learning styles on achievement in different learning environments. The Turkish Online Journal of Educational Technology, 43-50. Retrieved from University of Phoenix Library. The purpose of this study is to discover what effect multiple learning environments based on generative theory of Multimedia Learning has on students’ learning style and achievements. All elements must be taken into consideration when developing an instructional design process. These elements are placed in two categories, interior and exterior conditions. Learning style, age, and interest are interior conditions and important in developing a learning environment process. The findings proved the style type was not effective in different learning environment and students achievements.
  33. 33. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 33 2b. Narrative Review of Three Existing Employee Wellness Programs A review was completed of three existing employee wellness programs, including the following organizations: Monongalia Health System (MHS), Blue Shield of California, and Mutual of Omaha. All of these organizations have searched for opportunities to help employees’ lead healthier lifestyles that in turn will help reduce and contain health care costs. Employee wellness programs have been around for many years. In the last 10 years, health care has experienced astronomical cost increases and a decrease in reimbursement. Companies began to realize the health and wellness of their employees is intertwined with the hard and soft dollar savings for business. According to Harter and Klein, (2003) soft dollar savings includes decreased absenteeism, higher morale, increased retention and productivity, and reduced turnover. Hard dollar costs include time lost because of illness or injury (worker’s compensation) and a reduction of health care costs due to a decrease in claims. All three of these organizations searched for areas for improvement and sought ways to engage employees. MHS chose five areas to address: improved nutrition, enhanced fitness, weight management, heart care, and smoking cessation. “One thing is for sure, the road has already led to better health and better business for MHS, and plenty of other organizations are now setting off on journeys of their own” (Healthy by Design, 2004, p. 5). Blue Cross of California analyzed their employee risk assessments and determined more than 50% had on average three to five health risks, 34% had zero to two, and 15% had six or more risk factors. After instituting a wellness program, Blue Cross of California saw a significant decrease in employees’ risk factors and an average savings of $277 for medical expenses per year per employee (Healthy Lifestyle Rewards, 2006). Mutual of Omaha began requiring all members to attend equipment orientation to an on-site wellness center to help employees feel more comfortable at the center and so the employees
  34. 34. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 34 could be familiar with policies, procedures, and equipment. These members were also encouraged to take a fitness test evaluation. Wellness centers in many instances are the building block for furthering other health programs. This helps to encourage participation that has a direct impact on reducing risk factors. Many organizations have successfully integrated wellness programs into the workplace (Harter & Klein, 2003).
  35. 35. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 35 References Harter, C. and Klein, K., (2003). Get yourself centered: A healthy dose of fitness center fundamentals from Fortune 500 Mutual of Omaha. Absolute Advantage, 13-15. Retrieved from http://www.welcoa.org Healthy by design, (2004). Monongalia Health System, 1-6. Retrieved from http://www.welcoa.org Healthy lifestyle rewards, (2006). Absolute Advantage, 14-17. Retrieved from http://www.welcoa.org
  36. 36. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 36 2c. Components of Developed Plan 1) Participant Objectives At the end of this power point presentation the participants will be able to verbalize ways to live and encourage a healthier lifestyle including:  Activity and fitness recommendations  Importance of annual health screenings including EKG’s, pelvic exams/pap smears, prostate exams, breast exams, dental, vision, and hearing exams  Educational programs including: heart disease, cancer prevention, chronic pain, CVA prevention, diabetes, and stress management  Nutrition recommendations  Areas of interest including: screenings (mammograms, self-help and first aid, and weight management)
  37. 37. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 37 2c. Components of Developed Plan 2) Content Outline Presentation Purpose Participant Objectives Demographics of Participants  Activity/Fitness  Recommendations  A mix of moderate-intensity aerobic activity and muscle training activity  A mix of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity and muscle training activity  “Cardio Definitions”  Aerobic Activity  Intensity  Moderate-intensity  Vigorous-intensity  Muscle Strengthening Defined  Should be performed at least two days/week  Should incorporate all major muscles legs, hips, back, chest, abdomen, shoulders, and arms  Use repetitions and sets  How to measure activity intensity  Talk Test  If you are doing moderate-intensity activity, you can talk, but not sing, during the activity.
  38. 38. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 38  If you are doing vigorous-intensity activity, you will not be able to say more than a few words without pausing for a breath (Measuring physical activity intensity, 2012).  Annual Health Screenings  Electrocardiogram (EKG) Defined  Reasons EKG’s are performed  Routine Electrocardiograms  Know when to say “NO.”  Pelvic Exams – Pap Smears  Definition  Pelvic exam  Pap smear  Recommendations  Human Papillomavirus (HPV)  Cervical cancer  Prostate Exams  Digital Rectal Exam (DRE) defined  Recommendations  Who is at higher risk  Breast Exams  Early Detection is VITAL  Recommendations  Breast Cancer Awareness
  39. 39. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 39  Who Gets Breast Cancer?  Women  Men  Risk Factors  Annual Health Screenings  Symptoms of Breast Cancer  Skin irritation  Pain  Nipple retraction  Redness, scaly skin  Thickening of skin  Discharge  Reduce Your Risk of Breast Cancer  Decrease alcohol consumption  Get regular exercise  Maintain healthy weight  Breastfeed for at least 6 months  Weigh options of Hormone  Replacement Therapy (HRT)  Get regular screenings (Breast Cancer Screening, 2011).  Dental  Brushing and Flossing for Oral Health  Recommendations
  40. 40. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 40  Recommendations  Vision  Hearing **If you are having problems or symptoms effecting your eyes or ears, then you should have an exam**  Educational Programs  Heart Disease  Defined  Nation’s Number One Killer  Causes of Heart Disease  Cholesterol  Diabetes  *Arrhythmia  *Heart Attack  *Heart Failure  *High Blood Pressure  *Arrhythmias  Defined  Why Arrhythmias Matter  Cardiac Arrest  *Heart Attack  Defined  Symptoms
  41. 41. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 41  Educational Programs  Avoiding a Heart Attack  Don’t smoke, avoid tobacco products  Maintain normal blood pressure  Eat healthy diet  Exercise  Maintain weight  Regular medical check-ups  Control blood sugar  Take medicine as prescribed  Educational Programs  Heart Failure  Defined  Symptoms  Other Names for Heart Failure  Left-sided heart failure  Right-sided heart failure  Educational Programs  Heart Failure Causes  Most common  Coronary Heart Disease  HTN  Diabetes
  42. 42. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 42  Other causes  Cardiomyopathy  Heart valve disease  Arrhythmias  Congenital heart defects  High Blood Pressure  Also known as Hypertension (HTN)  Defined – “The silent killer”  Risk factors  Symptoms  Untreated HTN  Educational Programs  Cancer Prevention  Stay Healthy  Risk Factors  Tobacco-Related Cancers  Types  Statistics  Skin Cancer  Defined  Prevention and Early Detection  Educational Programs
  43. 43. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 43  Chronic Back and Neck Pain  Risk Factors  Relieving Back/Neck Pain  Back Saving Tips  Chronic Headaches  Types of Headaches  Risk Factors  Gain Control  Cerebrovascular Accident (CVA)  Defined  Coping  Risk Factors  Treatable Diseases  Lifestyle Factors  Types of Strokes  Ischemic  Hemorrhagic  TIA  Recognizing a Stroke  Symptoms  Using F.A.S.T.  Diabetes  Defined
  44. 44. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 44  Types of Diabetes  Type 1  Defined  Symptoms  Types of Diabetes  Type 2  Defined  Symptoms  People at Risk for Type 2 Diabetes  Impaired glucose tolerance test  Over 45  Family history  Overweight  Physical inactivity  High cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure  Specific Ethnic groups  Women with Gestational diabetes  Hypoglycemia (Low Blood Sugar)  Defined  Symptoms  Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar)  Defined  Symptoms
  45. 45. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 45  Diabetes  Complications  Statistics  Educational Programs  Cost of Diabetes  Reduce Your Risk  Stress Management  Stress Defined  Causes of Stress  Symptoms  Educational Programs  Causes of Workplace Stress  Managing Stress: Adjust Your Attitude  Nutrition  The Food Guide Pyramid  Recommendations  Visit www.mypyramid.gov  Educational Programs  Nutrition  Benefits of Fruits and Vegetables  Smart Fast Food Choices
  46. 46. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 46  Areas of Interest  Mammograms  Defined  Recommendations  Benefits of Screening mammograms  Weight Management  Factors Affecting Weight Gain  Important Facts  Shedding Pounds  Self-help/First aid  Self-care Defined  Home Treatment Option  Know When To Seek Help  Disclaimer - All illustrations used in this Power Point presentation were obtained from public domain websites. No permission was required to use these illustrations. However, all illustrations were cited with credit given to the appropriate website.
  47. 47. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 47 2d. Summary of Mentor Feedback PowerPoint presentation draft was emailed to mentor for input. Mentor was pleased with the slide design. Slides two and three include presentation purpose and participant objectives – mentor suggested trimming these two slides down to avoid wordiness. Again, mentor reminded me to ensure I have permission to use all clipart or pictures. All clipart being used is either from Microsoft or Baxter Healthcare and are credited as needed. Mentor states PowerPoint presentation is well prepared and informative. Mentor was complimentary of the brochure design and content and agreed this would be a good reference source for new employees and current staff. Mentor reiterated the importance of having all Evidence of Accomplishment completed prior to beginning NUR 590B. Approval was given to proceed with presentation.
  48. 48. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 48 3a. Summary of Arrangements & Process for Implementation Once the material was decided by reviewing the results of the learning needs assessment and discussions with the COHN at Baxter, arrangements and presentation implementation were discussed. We agreed the presentation would require an allotted time of one and one half hours. It was determined the staff would best benefit from the presentation if provided before or after work hours. According to the LNA, most participants did not want to come in on their day off and the presentation would exceed their lunch time allotted. Dates and times were finalized to be accessible to the participants who took the LNA and reach all three shifts. Final dates and times selected were: 3/13/13 at 1:30pm – 3:00pm CST 3/14/13 at 7:15am – 8:45am CST All necessary documents were emailed to Amy Thalmueller, RN, COHN, including PowerPoint presentation to be printed out for handout so staff can take notes, content outline, and brochure. Discussion of equipment needed for presentation occurred – I will need to email the PowerPoint presentation link to the COHN to deliver the presentation with Microsoft PowerPoint Web Presentation. I am excited to see how this works and how the staff receive the presentation and information. A test was performed to ensure the PowerPoint presentation via web access with Baxter COHN worked properly.
  49. 49. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 49 3b. Summary of Presentation Experience PowerPoint presentation was given to both groups as previously decided. My timing could have been better, had to rush more at the end. Timing was better with the second presentation, but still had to rush at the end. Answered questions as they arose from the group. This was the first time I presented material using Microsoft Web Presentation. I spoke to the group over a speaker phone. The staff stated at the end of the program they really enjoyed the presentation and having the ability to interact with instructor and ask questions. The only suggestions the participants had were timing and using less technical terms. I had already identified the timing of the presentation could have been better. I was not aware I had used some medical terms that were too technical for the staff. I need to remember to use layman’s terms when presenting material, especially when the majority of participants are non-clinical.
  50. 50. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 50 3b. Summary of Mentor Feedback Mentor and I were in agreement the evaluation surveys overall were positive. The participants provided constructive feedback and were on point. Mentor made a good point that while the length of the presentation was appropriate for a practicum, the material would be better received and retained if the presentation was broken into smaller in-services and given over several presentations. Overall, the presentation was well received by the staff. The staff were especially positive about the brochure created and having the important information available at their fingertips. They liked the listing of websites provided where they could seek further information to keep informed and live healthier lifestyles.
  51. 51. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 51 4a. Summary of Evaluation Survey Eleven participants from the original group of 15 who took the learning needs assessment attended one of the two sessions presented and completed an evaluation survey. Two members of the group no longer were in the role of Wellness Ambassadors for Baxter and the other two members left the organization for job opportunities elsewhere. I was hopeful all previous participants would be able to attend the actual presentation, but it was not surprising to me that we lost several participants. Overall the feedback was constructive and positive. The only suggestions mentioned were timing and the need to use less technical terms. As I presented this PowerPoint presentation on two different days and times, I was aware my timing could have been better. Toward the end of our allotted time, I had to rush to get through the material. I also realized on several occasions I was using medical terminology instead of presenting in layman’s terms. Staff were engaged and asked questions when necessary. The staff were especially positive about the brochure created and having the important information available at their fingertips. They liked the listing of websites provided where they could seek further information to keep informed. I was informed by the COHN that the brochure has been presented to Baxter Healthcare administration and will be used for new hires and available for current employees.
  52. 52. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 52 4b. Summary of Mentor Feedback My mentor and I are in agreement the overall evaluation surveys were positive. The participants provided constructive feedback. The only suggestions identified by the participants were the timing of the presentation – had to rush towards the end and the need to be less technical – some of the medical terminology was difficult for the group to understand. I had a discussion with my mentor about the importance of presenting material in a timely manner as well as remembering the group participants and using layman’s terms. Mentor suggested while this presentation was appropriate for the practicum, breaking the presentation into smaller sections to present would be better received by the audience. This is a “hot topic” right now as employers search for ways to reduce costs and curb unnecessary expenditures. Increasing health care costs and decreasing reimbursements will continue to be an issue for employers and employees both.
  53. 53. PRACTICUM DOCUMENTATION 53 4b. Mentor’s Final Evaluation of Overall Practicum Achievements The topic of this Practicum is timely. Employers are becoming more and more invested in their employee’s overall health. Providing information such as provided in the Brochure and the PowerPoint are exactly what is needed to aid in improving health. Kim was able to ascertain the information needed by the target audience in order to create a brochure and PowerPoint as vehicles of providing the needed health information. The brochure is attractive and easy to read, providing not only basic information for health promotion but also provides websites to further investigate areas of individual interest. The PowerPoint also has eye- appeal while providing a lot of useful information for improving personal health. Throughout the Practicum process, Kim has been focused and accepting of suggestions. Her enthusiasm for the project is reflected in the finished product. I was impressed that she not only presented the PowerPoint to one shift but to all shifts in order to include everyone. It has been my pleasure to mentor Kim. Job well done. Debora T. Williams, RN, MSN, MBA/HA

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