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E poster

  1. 1. April CobosEFFECTIVEPEDAGOGICAL TOOLSFOR MULTILINGUAL ANDNONSTANDARD DIALECTSTUDENTS IN THEWRITING CLASSROOM
  2. 2. My main objective is to advocate for moreprofessional development opportunities inthe form of conferences, workshops, andin-services for current and future Englishinstructors that allow for a more well-rounded understanding of how to workwith nonstandard dialect and multilingualstudents in the classroom.PURPOSE:
  3. 3. To have current and future English collegelevel instructors walk away from linguisticand language based professionaldevelopment with a better understandingof how to provide student agency forstudents with nonstandard dialects in thevarious stages of their own writingprocess.GOAL:
  4. 4.  Overview of common problems with nonstandarddialect students and multilingual students in theclassroom. Explore scholarship, specifically bidialectialism,critical contrastive rhetoric and code-meshing. Provide instructors with pedagogical tools thatcan be applied to specific classroom settings Provide instructors effective, best pedagogicalpractices in their own classrooms and to findmethods for transforming current practices intomore effective practices.PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENTOBJECTIVES
  5. 5. Baxter and Holland’s categories ofstudent awareness: Low awareness:Those Black American students whospeak Ebonics and lack adequate code-switching abilities Some awareness:Those Black American students whospeak Ebonics and show some code-switching abilities High awareness:Those Black American students whospeak Standard English only or who arebidialectical, speaking Ebonics andhaving strong code-switching abilities(Baxter and Holland 149)Baxter andHolland presenta study aboutthe levels ofawareness ofcode-switchingin a study tosuggest thatinstructors needto provide moreawareness totheirnonstandarddialect studentsto allow them tohave studentagency overtheir ownchoices in thewritingclassroom.
  6. 6. Rosina Lippi-Green’s textwould be avaluable resourcefor a professionaldevelopment forEnglishinstructors. Itcoversnonstandarddialects, languagemyths, StandardEnglish myths,etc.
  7. 7. “In aiming for praxis with and among students,critical teachers consistently question what theydo and critique the means by which they teachstudents.”There is a need for consistent and constantreevaluation of purpose and methodology. Inthis regard, teachers ask themselves:What am I doing?, Where is it leading?,What do I intend to achieve?, Wheremight I be better informed?”KUBOTA AND LEHNERCRITICAL CONTRASTIVE RHETORIC (PG. 23)
  8. 8. The differencesbetween askingstudents tocode-switchand askingstudents tocode-mesh.They advocatefor code-meshing inorder toprovide moreSTUDENTAGENCY.CANAGARJAHAND LUNA
  9. 9. CODE-MESHING STRATEGIESC A N AG A R A JA H A N D M I C H A E L - L U N A , 6 0
  10. 10.  Baxter, Milton, and Rochelle Holland. “Addressing the Needsof Students Who Speak a Nonstandard English Dialect.” AdultBasic Education and Literacy Journal 1.3 (Fall 2007) 145-153. EBSCO. Web. 29 January 2013. Kubota, Ryuko, and Al Lehner. “Toward Critical ContrastiveRhetoric.” Journal of Second Language Writing 13: (2004), 7-27. ERIC. Web. 4 March 2013. Lippi-Green, Rosina. English With An Accent. 2nd Edition.Routledge, New York: 2012. Print.------Companion Website. Routledge. Web. 13 February 2013.http://www.routledge.com/cw/lippi-green-9780415559119/ Michael-Luna, Sarah, and A. Suresh Canagarajah.“Multilingual Academic Literacies:Pedagogical Foundations forCode Meshing in Primary and Higher Education.”Journal ofApplied Linguistics 4.1 (2007): 55-77. EBSCO. Web. 17 Feb2013.WORKS CITED

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