Pratheek Adidela
10583
What is it?
• Developed by Sony and Philips in late 2002
• Evolved from Radio Frequency Identification(RFID) technology
• ...
What is it?
• Easy to use wireless communication interface for the last few
centimeters
• Easy to use target selection, by...
What is it?
Wireless short range communication technology
• NFC is designed for short distance wireless communication
• Al...
What is it?
NFC technology can benefit from mobile phones
The technology is compatible with existing RFID structures, exis...
Comparison with Bluetooth
Aspect

NFC

Bluetooth

Bluetooth LE

RFID Compatible

ISO 18000-3

active

active

Standardisat...
TAG TYPES
Type 1
Type 1 NFC tags have data collision protection and can be set to
either read and write capable or read-on...
TAG TYPES
Type 2
Type 2 NFC tags also have data collision protection and can be
rewriteable or read-only. They start at 48...
TAG TYPES
Type 3
Also equipped with data collision protection, NFC tag type 3 has
larger memory and faster speeds than tag...
TAG TYPES
Type 4
Type 4 NFC tags can use either NFC-A or NFC-B
communication and have data collision protection. The tag i...
NFC Basic Roles
• Reader/Writer and Card – Typically a transaction occurs between an
active device that sends out signals ...
Current Uses of NFC
•As

an RFID Tag Scanner

•As

a Debit/Credit Card Substitute

•For

Data Exchange

•For

Bluetooth pa...
Prospective Uses
•

Personal Payments

•

Keyless Security

•

National, International and Corporate Identification

•

So...
Advantages
• Quicker connections, no typing errors
• Easy to use, only requires the click of a button, no software
• They ...
Disadvantages

• Only works in short ranges
• Low data transfer rate
• Can be costly for merchant companies to initially a...
Bibliography
•

http://nfc-bbysfu.blogspot.in

•

http://smb-tech-guide.com/barclaycards-paytag-is-simple-alternative-tone...
Thank You!
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Nfc introduction

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NFC or near-field communication, this is an introduction to the types of tags that are used.

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Nfc introduction

  1. 1. Pratheek Adidela 10583
  2. 2. What is it? • Developed by Sony and Philips in late 2002 • Evolved from Radio Frequency Identification(RFID) technology • Short Range Radio Communication Technology • Frequency: 13.56 MHz. • Max. Bandwidth: 424Kbits/sec • Communication starts when two NFC-compatible devices brought together less then four centimeters • NFC Forum is the leading organization that organizes the efforts
  3. 3. What is it? • Easy to use wireless communication interface for the last few centimeters • Easy to use target selection, by simply holding two devices close to each other • Operating distance typical up to 10 cm
  4. 4. What is it? Wireless short range communication technology • NFC is designed for short distance wireless communication • Allows intuitive initialization of wireless networks • NFC is complementary to Bluetooth and 802.11 with their long distance capabilities • NFC does not require line of sight • Easy and simple connection method • Provides communication method to non-self powered devices
  5. 5. What is it? NFC technology can benefit from mobile phones The technology is compatible with existing RFID structures, existing RFID tags and contactless smart cards Short range communication (up to 4 cm.) –  Automatic –  Inherent coupling security Ease of use (Very familiar to people, only touch) Mobile phones can be used both as an information storage devices or an NFC reader –  They can read information from NFC tags –  They can be used as a digital storage e.g. storing credit card information.
  6. 6. Comparison with Bluetooth Aspect NFC Bluetooth Bluetooth LE RFID Compatible ISO 18000-3 active active Standardisation body ISO/IEC Bluetooth SIG Bluetooth SIG Network Standard Point-to-Point WPAN WPAN Cryptography not with RFID available available Range <0.2 m ~100 m (class 1) ~ 50 m Frequency 13.56 MHz 2.4-2.5 GHz 2.4-2.5 GHz Bit rate 424 kbits/s 2.1 Mbit/s ~1 Mbit/s Set-up time <0.1 s <6 s <0.006 s varies with class < 15 mA (read and transmit) Power Consumption < 15 mA (read)
  7. 7. TAG TYPES Type 1 Type 1 NFC tags have data collision protection and can be set to either read and write capable or read-only. Read-only programming prevents the information from being changed or written over once embedded in the tag. Type 1 tags have 96 bytes of memory, enough for a URL or a small amount of data. The tag’s memory can expand to a larger size as needed. The low price makes type 1 tags the ideal choice for most near field communication needs.
  8. 8. TAG TYPES Type 2 Type 2 NFC tags also have data collision protection and can be rewriteable or read-only. They start at 48 bytes of memory, half of what the type 1 tags can hold, but can expand to be as large as a type 1 tag. Communication speeds are the same for tag types 1 and 2.
  9. 9. TAG TYPES Type 3 Also equipped with data collision protection, NFC tag type 3 has larger memory and faster speeds than tag types 1 and 2. This tag is part of the FeliCa system. The bigger size lets it hold more complex codes beyond URLs, but it costs more to create each tag.
  10. 10. TAG TYPES Type 4 Type 4 NFC tags can use either NFC-A or NFC-B communication and have data collision protection. The tag is set as either rewritable or read-only when manufactured and this setting cannot be changed by the user, unlike the other NFC tags which can be altered at a later date. The tag holds 32 Kbytes in memory and has faster speeds than the other tags.
  11. 11. NFC Basic Roles • Reader/Writer and Card – Typically a transaction occurs between an active device that sends out signals and receives information and a passive device that simply sends the information and does not receive anything other than instructions on what data to reply with. The reader/writer is the smartphone serving as the active device and the card is the NFC tag serving as the passive device. Smartphones can take on the role of card, however, when they act as a credit card for contactless payments. Then the credit card reader becomes the reader/writer and the smartphone serves as the passive card device. • Initiator and Target – NFC technology has a major advantage over other technologies such as RFID. NFC can create peer-to-peer sharing between two phones. In this case, the phone making the connection or sending an invitation is the initiator and the phone receiving the instructions and sending back information is the target. Yet both phones can serve both roles by switching back and forth depending on what transmission is being sent, though this requires a higher level of technology.
  12. 12. Current Uses of NFC •As an RFID Tag Scanner •As a Debit/Credit Card Substitute •For Data Exchange •For Bluetooth pairing or WiFi authentication
  13. 13. Prospective Uses • Personal Payments • Keyless Security • National, International and Corporate Identification • Social Networking • Entertainment • Health and Public Safety
  14. 14. Advantages • Quicker connections, no typing errors • Easy to use, only requires the click of a button, no software • They are compatible with existing RFID structures • Cost efficient for the average customer
  15. 15. Disadvantages • Only works in short ranges • Low data transfer rate • Can be costly for merchant companies to initially adopt the technology
  16. 16. Bibliography • http://nfc-bbysfu.blogspot.in • http://smb-tech-guide.com/barclaycards-paytag-is-simple-alternative-tonear-field-communication/ • Current Benefits and Future Directions of NFC Services, Kerem Ok, Vedat Coskun, Mehmet N. Aydin, Busra Ozdenizci, www.NFCLab.com, ISIK University, Istanbul • http://www.nearfieldcommunication.org • http://answers.oreilly.com/topic/2824-near-field-communication-what-itis-and-how-it-works/ • http://www.addictivetips.com/hardware/what-is-nfc-how-it-works-whatare-its-practical-applications/
  17. 17. Thank You!

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