Curriculum development & management of learning by ricky20

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  • To our professor Dr. Pesigan, to my co –curriculum developers a pleasant afternoon to all of you…today I will discuss Curriculum Development and Management of Learning. I would like to start my presentation in a video clip …let’s watch this..
  • Just read the slide..
  • Just read the slide..
  • Just read the slide..
  • Curriculum ApproachesBehavioral Approach: this is based on a blueprint, where goals and objectives are specified, contents and activities are also arranged to match with the learning objectives. The learning outcomes are evaluated in terms of goals and objectives set at the beginning. This approach started with the idea of Frederick Taylor which is aimed to achieve efficiency.Managerial Approach:In this approach, the principal is the curriculum leader and at the same time instructional leader who is supposed to be the general manager. The general manager sets the policies and priorities, establishes the direction of change and innovation, the planning and organizing curriculum and instruction. Some of the roles of the Curriculum Supervisors are the following:…..read on the slide.
  • Systems approachThis was influenced by systems theory, where the parts of the total school district or school are examined in terms of how they relate to each other. The organizational chart of the school represents a systems approach. It shows the line staff relationships of personnel and how decision are made. The following are of equal importance AdministrationCounselingCurriculumInstructionEvaluationHumanistic approachThis approach is rooted in the progressive philosophy and child- centered movement. It considers the formal or planned curriculum and the informal or hidden curriculum. It also considers the whole child and believes that in curriculum the total development of the individual is the prime consideration.In curriculum implementation there are two extreme views they areLaissez-fair approach or the “let-alone” approach. This gives teachers absolute power to determine what they see best to implement in the classroom. In effect, this allows teachers to teach lessons they believe are appropriate for their classes and in whatever way they want to teach such lessons.Authoritarian control. In this view, teachers are directed by authority figures through a memorandum to follow a curriculum. Teachers have no control or leeway over the subjects they are teaching. The school head exercise absolute power in directing teachers to teach certain subjects in specified ways. In other words, this approach is dictatorial way of imposing cirricular implementation in the classroom.
  • Leadership refers to the role or process that enables systems and individuals to achieve their goals. Curriculum refers to all experiences that learners have to go through in a program of education. Curriculum leadership therefore is the act of exercising functions that enables the achievement of a school’s goal of providing quality education.Here are the Roles and Function of a Curriculum Leader by Glatthorn 1997. He was an educator interested in how curriculum development could be used to make teaching effective. He provides the list of essential functions of curriculum leadership carried out at the school and classroom levels
  • Just read the slide..The roles and function show that regardless of whether these are at the school level or classroom level, curriculum leadership involves tasks that guarantee quality education. The tasks and functions may further be specified into four major tasksEnsuring curriculum quality and applicabilityIntegrating and aligning the curriculumImplementing the curriculum efficientlyRegularly evaluating, enriching and updating the curriculum
  • Here are the following elements/ components of the curriculumRead the slide….Our aims, goals & objectives will always observed and take consideration of 3 domains Cognitive – knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis & evaluation.Affective – receiving, responding, valuing, organizing, & characterizingPsychomotor – perception set, guided response, mechanism, complex overt response.
  • Just read the slide..There is a set of criteria to be used in selection of subject matter for the curriculum.
  • Principles to follow in organizing the learning contents according to Palma, 1992 were the following balance, articulation and sequence.Just read the slide..Instructional strategies and methods will link to curriculum experience, the core and heart of curriculum. The instructional strategies and methods will put into action the goals and use of the content in order to produce an outcome.Teaching strategies covert the written curriculum to instruction, among these are time-tested methods, inquiry approaches, constructivist and other emerging strategies that complement new theories in teaching and learning.Here are some guide for the selection and use of methods.
  • Just read the slide..To be effective, all curricula must have an element of evaluation. Curriculum evaluation refer to the formal determination of the quality, effectiveness or value of the program, process and product of the curriculum. Several methods of evaluation came up. The most widely used is the Stufflebeam’s CIPP model. The process in CIPP model is continuious and very important to curriculum managers. CIPP is an acronymContext ( environment of curriculum)Input ( ingredients of curriculum)Process ( ways and means of implementing)Product ( accomplishment of goals)Here are suggested steps or plan of action for the process of curriculum.
  • As part of my report I would like to thanks Undersecretary Yolanda S. Quijano of DepEd who presented this presentation during the National Conference that I have attended last November 16-18, 2012 at Queen Margarette Hotel in Lucena city. Now let’s take a look to the….
  • In recognition of the importance of Education for Sustainable Development, the United Nations General Assembly declared 2005-2012 as the Decade of Education for Sustainable Development. The goals of the decade are to provide an opportunity for refining and promoting the vision of, and transition to sustainable development – through all forms of education, public awareness and training, and to give an enhanced profile to the important role of education and learning in sustainable development. So the question on hand is: (Read slide).
  • Tilbury and Wortman describes education for sustainable development as one that seeks to …..
  • Education for sustainable develop proposed education shifts : (Read slide)
  • The vision of k to 12 puts emphasis on the holistic development of learners which is an essential component of ESD. The holistic development ensures that the learners have the 21st century skills and are prepared for higher education, middle-level skills development, employment, and entrepreneurship.
  • Holistic development is equated to improved teaching that ensures mastery of learning.
  • Mastery learning ensures that the desired outcomes identified in the k to 12 curriculum are achieved. These desired outcomes are demonstrated by an individual who …….. (Read slide)
  • ENVISIONING – Being able to imagine a better future; if we know where we want to go, we will be better able to work out how to get thereCRITICAL THINKING AND REFLECTION – Learning to question our current belief systems and to recognize the assumptions underlying our knowledge, perspective and opinions; Critical thinking helps people learn to examine exonomic, environmental, social and cultural structures in the context of sustainable developmentSYSTEMIC THINKING – Acknowledging complexities and looking for links and synergies when trying to find solutions to problemsBUILDING PARTNERSHIPS – promoting dialogue and negotiation, learning to work togetherPARTICIPATION IN DECISION MAKING – empowering people
  • Role-plays and simulations - provide an opportunity for learners to gain an in-depth understanding of another person’s perspective and to empathize with othersGroup discussions - The use of discussion is attempt to counteract the risk of the tutor taking a transmissive or authoritarian approach, thereby enabling students to explore their own and others’ views. The facilitator often encourages listening and self-reflection rather than argument.Stimulus activities - A stimulus activity might involve watching a video or looking at photos, poems or newspaper extracts to initiate reflection or discussion.Debates - encourage students to gather information about the topic and develop an argument. However, they need to be carefully handled as they can become confrontational and learners may be discouraged from engaging or empathizing with others’ viewsCritical reading and writing - Reading and writing are seen by tutors as important social practices and the key to progressing sustainability and literacy. Learners can gain from deconstructing discourses to identify the possible motivation of the author. They may also be able to envisage alternative futures, and write a contrasting account based on differing perspectivesProblem-based learning - a sustainability-related issue may be identified and students asked to investigate this to generate a body of knowledge. They can then develop a vision of alternative actions and potential solutions to the problem, which they use to devise a plan of action. The action may then be carried out, followed by a period of reflection and evaluation. This process promotes both the conceptual and practical aspects of sustainability literacy.Fieldwork and outdoor learning - fieldwork is an example of experiential pedagogy that can influence students’ emotions (Sivek, 2002) and help develop the critical thinking skills so essential to understanding the complexity of sustainability (Jones, 2003; Scott and Gough, 2003). Fieldwork for sustainability is often based on issues in the local community and environs, linking theory to real-world examples (Hope, 2009). There is also evidence that outdoor experience is an important precursor to understanding sustainability (Palmer and Suggate, 1996) and promotes learning by encouraging active learning (Hope, 2009).
  • Role-plays and simulations - provide an opportunity for learners to gain an in-depth understanding of another person’s perspective and to empathize with othersGroup discussions - The use of discussion is attempt to counteract the risk of the tutor taking a transmissive or authoritarian approach, thereby enabling students to explore their own and others’ views. The facilitator often encourages listening and self-reflection rather than argument.Stimulus activities - A stimulus activity might involve watching a video or looking at photos, poems or newspaper extracts to initiate reflection or discussion.Debates - encourage students to gather information about the topic and develop an argument. However, they need to be carefully handled as they can become confrontational and learners may be discouraged from engaging or empathizing with others’ viewsCritical reading and writing - Reading and writing are seen by tutors as important social practices and the key to progressing sustainability and literacy. Learners can gain from deconstructing discourses to identify the possible motivation of the author. They may also be able to envisage alternative futures, and write a contrasting account based on differing perspectivesProblem-based learning - a sustainability-related issue may be identified and students asked to investigate this to generate a body of knowledge. They can then develop a vision of alternative actions and potential solutions to the problem, which they use to devise a plan of action. The action may then be carried out, followed by a period of reflection and evaluation. This process promotes both the conceptual and practical aspects of sustainability literacy.Fieldwork and outdoor learning - fieldwork is an example of experiential pedagogy that can influence students’ emotions (Sivek, 2002) and help develop the critical thinking skills so essential to understanding the complexity of sustainability (Jones, 2003; Scott and Gough, 2003). Fieldwork for sustainability is often based on issues in the local community and environs, linking theory to real-world examples (Hope, 2009). There is also evidence that outdoor experience is an important precursor to understanding sustainability (Palmer and Suggate, 1996) and promotes learning by encouraging active learning (Hope, 2009).
  • Since language is a part of curriculumthe next question is: (Read slide).
  • Language is a bridge, a connection that transmits our thoughts, ideas, information and messages to other people. It is a social process that binds people together. It engages people in negotiating a sustainable future, making decisions, and acting on them. Based on these thoughts, it is obvious that language development is essential for sustainable development
  • Communicative competence and critical literacy is the desired goal of k to 12 Mother Tongue-Based Multilingual Education. This is a challenge for all of us. I’m certain that this challenge can be somehow addressed to all of us---- which means that you have put into practice your learning in your classroom work, making children use their language the best way that they can.
  • And the real question is...
  • Remember that teachers are leaders. (Read the slide.) Thanks God, we are all practicing the noble vocation of teaching and leading. Leading reforms in education as education is the main tool in sustainable development.
  • Curriculum development & management of learning by ricky20

    1. 1. DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    2. 2. LET’S WATCH THE VIDEO CLIPDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    3. 3. THE NATURE OF CURRICULUMDEVELOPMENT SYSTEM  CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT Development is a specific word that connotes change. Change means any alternation or modification in the existing order of things. Change may not necessarily result in development. Only positive change brings about development. For change to be positive and result in development, it must be Purposeful, Planned, and Progressive.DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    4. 4.  CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT SYSTEM A system is an assemblage of objects in some form of regular interdependence or interaction; an organic organized whole. It is generally defines as some form of structure or operation, concept or function, composed of united and integrated parts. A system then is the integration of separate but interdependent and interacting parts into an organic whole which meant to accomplish a certain purpose or perform a specific function.DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    5. 5.  Curriculum Development System is defined as an integrated, coherent and comprehensive program for continually updating and improving curriculum and instruction in a school so that it can be better attain its purpose.DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    6. 6. CURRICULUM APPROACHES 1. BEHAVIORAL APPROACH 2. MANAGERIAL APPROACH  Some of the roles of the Curriculum Supervisor a. Help develop the school’s education goals b. Plan curriculum with students, parents, teachers & stakeholders c. Design programs of study by grade levels d. Plan or schedule classes or school calendar e. Prepare curriculum guides by subject area f. Help in the evaluation and selection of textbook g. Assist teachers in implementation of the curriculum h. Encourage curriculum innovation and changeDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    7. 7. CURRICULUM APPROACHES 3. SYSTEMS APPROACH 4. HUMANISTIC APPROACH CURRICULUM IMPLEMENTATION There are 2 extreme views about curriculum implementation I. LAISSEZ-FAIRE APPROACH II. AUTHORITARIAN CONTROLDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    8. 8. CURRICULUM LEADERSHIP  THE ROLES AND FUNCTIONS OF A CURRICULUM LEADER: (by Glatthorn 1997) AT THE SCHOOL LEVEL; a) Develop the school’s vision of a quality curriculum b) Supplement the state’s or district’s educational goal c) Develop the school’s own program of studies d) Develop learning-centered schedule e) Determine the nature and extent of curriculum integration f) Align the curriculum g) Monitor and assist in curriculum implementationDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    9. 9. CURRICULUM LEADERSHIPFUNCTIONS AT THE CLASSROOMLEVEL: Develop yearly planning calendars for operationalizing the curriculum Develop unit of study Enrich the curriculum and remediate learning Evaluate the curriculumDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    10. 10. ELEMENTS/COMPONENTS OF THECURRICULUM  COMPONENT I: Curriculum Aims, Goals & Objectives AIMS: Elementary, Secondary and Tertiary GOALS: School Vision, Mission OBJECTIVES: Educational DOMAINS: 1. Cognitive 2. Affective 3. PsychomotorDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    11. 11.  COMPONENT II: Curriculum Content or Subject Matter 1. Subject-centered view curriculum 2. Learner-centered view curriculum Criteria used in selection of subject matter for the curriculum: Self-sufficiency Utility Significance Learnability Validity FeasibilityDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    12. 12.  COMPONENT III: Curriculum Experience Guides for the selection and use of methods:  Teaching methods are means to achieve the end  There is no single best teaching method  Teaching methods should stimulate the learner’s desire to develop the cognitive, affective, psychomotor, social& spiritual domain of an individual.  In the choice of teaching methods, learning styles of the students should be considered.  Flexibility should be a consideration in the use of teaching methods  In every method should lead to the development of the learning outcome in three domainsDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    13. 13.  COMPONENT IV: Curriculum Evaluation Suggested Steps or Plan of Action for the process of curriculum evaluation. Focus on one particular component of the curriculum. Will it be subject area, the grade level, the course, or the degree program? Specify objectives of evaluation Collect or gather the information. Organize the information Analyze the information Report the information Recycle the information for continuous feedback, modification and adjustment to be made.DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    14. 14. DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    15. 15. How is K TO 12 anchored in Education for Sustainable Development?DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    16. 16. Education for Sustainable Development • Seeks to engage people in negotiating a sustainable future, making decisions, and acting on them • Creates settings in which students can make their own their own experiences, can try things, have organize things for themselves and have to cope with challenges (learning by doing) • Requires at least a holistic approach Tilbury and Wortman, 2004DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    17. 17. Proposed Educational Shifts FROM TO Passing on knowledge Understanding and getting to the root of issues Teaching attitudes and values Encouraging values clarification Seeing people as the problem Seeing people as facilitators of change Sending messages Dialogue, negotiation and action Behaving as expert - formal & Acting as a partner - informal & authoritarian Egalitarian Raising awareness Changing the mental models which influence decisions & actions Changing behaviour More focus on structural and institutional change Tilbury and Wortman, 2004DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    18. 18. With K to 12, we will.. Produce holistically developed learners who have 21st century skills and are prepared for higher education, middle-level skills development, employment, and entrepreneurship.“..country with an organized and shared rapid expansion of our economythrough a government dedicated in honing and mobilizing ourpeople’s skills and energies..” -Philippine Development Plan 2011-2016DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    19. 19. Holistic Development Improved Mastery Teaching LearningDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    20. 20. DESIRED OUTCOMES  Possesses a healthy mind and body  Has solid moral and spiritual grounding  Has essential knowledge, skills and attitudes to continuously develop himself/herself to the fullest  Engages in critical thinking and creative problem solving  Contributes to the development of a progressive, just and humane society  Is proud of being a Filipino  Appreciates and cares for the humanity, the world and the environmentDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    21. 21. K to 12 and ESD Convergence A. Skills Development 1. Envisioning 2. Critical Thinking and Reflection 3. Systemic Thinking 4. Building Partnerships 5. Participation in Decision-makingDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    22. 22. K to 12 and ESD Convergence B. Pedagogical Strategies • Role-playing • Group discussions • Stimulus Activities • DebatesDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    23. 23. K to 12 and ESD Convergence B. Pedagogical Strategies • Critical reading and writing • Problem-based learning • Fieldwork and outdoor learningDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    24. 24. Is Language Development Essential in Education for Sustainable Development?DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    25. 25. Language  is a bridge, a connection to the environment  transmits our thoughts, ideas, information and messages to other people, a social process that binds people together.  engages people in negotiating a sustainable future, making decisions, and acting on them.DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    26. 26. Language Development in K to 12  Every child-a-reader in grade 1 in his/her mother tongue.  Every child-a-reader in grade 3 in Filipino and English.  Communicative competence and critical literacyDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    27. 27. DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    28. 28. Teachers are Leaders in k to 12 and SD  Teaching and Leading are about People,  People developing People,  People developing Teachers,  People moulding the Life of Children,  People shaping the Country’s Destiny.DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    29. 29. “Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit” AristotleDECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    30. 30. DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO
    31. 31. DECEMBER 1.2012 RICKY P. DALWAMPO

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