Dna replication, repair, recombination

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Dna replication, repair, recombination

  1. 1. Cell & MolecularBiology
  2. 2. DNA Replication,Repair andRecombination
  3. 3. Chapter 6
  4. 4. DNA Replication
  5. 5. Three models ofDNA replication
  6. 6. Figure 6-6 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  7. 7. Each strand of DNAin a double helixserves as a template
  8. 8. Base Pairingis at the heartof DNA replication
  9. 9. Figure 6-4 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  10. 10. Replication Origins
  11. 11. “...positions at which the DNAis first opened up... usually markedby a particular sequence ofnucleotides.”
  12. 12. Figure 6-5 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  13. 13. Replication Forks
  14. 14. Figure 6-9 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  15. 15. DNA replicationis bidirectional
  16. 16. DNA issynthesized5’ to 3’
  17. 17. Figure 6-10 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  18. 18. Figure 6-11 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  19. 19. Leading andlagging strands
  20. 20. Figure 6-12 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  21. 21. DNA Polymerase
  22. 22. Accuracy
  23. 23. Nucleotide addition is catalyzedonly when base-pairing is correct.
  24. 24. Figure 6-13 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  25. 25. Proofreading clips outadded nucleotides thatdo not correctly base-pair.
  26. 26. Figure 6-14 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  27. 27. For proofreading to work,DNA must be synthesizedfrom 5’ to 3’.
  28. 28. Figure 6-15 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  29. 29. DNA polymerase canonly add nucleotides toa base-paired nucleotidein a DNA double helix.
  30. 30. So the synthesis of DNAbegins with RNA primers.
  31. 31. Figure 6-17a Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  32. 32. Figure 6-16 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  33. 33. Figure 6-17a Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  34. 34. Figure 6-17b Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  35. 35. The Replication Machine
  36. 36. Helicase
  37. 37. Single-Strand Binding Protein
  38. 38. Sliding Clamp
  39. 39. Clamp Loader
  40. 40. DNA Primase
  41. 41. Telomerase
  42. 42. Figure 6-17b Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  43. 43. Figure 6-18 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  44. 44. DNA Repair
  45. 45. Replication Errors
  46. 46. Figure 6-21a Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  47. 47. Figure 6-21b Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  48. 48. Figure 6-21c Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  49. 49. Mismatch Repair
  50. 50. Figure 6-22 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  51. 51. DNA Damage
  52. 52. DepurinationDeamination
  53. 53. Figure 6-23 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  54. 54. Figure 6-25a Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  55. 55. Figure 6-25b Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  56. 56. ThymineDimerization
  57. 57. Figure 6-24 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  58. 58. Repair:1. excision2. resynthesis3. ligation
  59. 59. Figure 6-26 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  60. 60. Double-Stranded Breaks
  61. 61. NonhomologousEnd-Joining
  62. 62. Figure 6-27 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  63. 63. HomologousRecombination
  64. 64. “...the exchange ofgenetic informationbetween a pair ofhomologous DNA molecules...”
  65. 65. Double-strandedbreak repair
  66. 66. Figure 6-31 (part 1 of 2) Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  67. 67. Figure 6-31 (part 2 of 2) Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  68. 68. Meiosis
  69. 69. Page 183
  70. 70. Figure 6-30 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  71. 71. Figure 6-31 (part 1 of 2) Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  72. 72. Figure 6-31 (part 2 of 2) Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  73. 73. MobileGeneticElements
  74. 74. or,Transposons
  75. 75. DNA-Only Transposons
  76. 76. 3 Bacterial TransposonsFigure 6-32 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  77. 77. Transposase
  78. 78. Figure 6-33 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  79. 79. Retrotransposons
  80. 80. Figure 6-34 Essential Cell Biology (© Garland Science 2010)
  81. 81. Reverse Transcriptase

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