Plagiarism
                or,
How Not to Steal from Other Writers


      Ann P. Linder, Ph.D.
    The Montgomery Academy
Word Origins:

Latin: plagiarius, a kidnapper; also, as used by the
     Roman author Martial, a literary thief.
   French...
Why do we document
     sources?
Why do we document
            sources?
•   Published--and in some cases, unpublished--work
    is intellectual property. ...
Plagiarism in modern America:
The sad case of Kaavya Viswanathan
Spring 2006
•   After accusations that she had plagiarized
    passages in her novel from authors Megan
    McCafferty and ...
Other famous authors who
      have been accused of
           plagiariam:
•   Alex Haley, Roots

•   Stephen Ambrose, The...
Using Sources
Source:   “In all these movements. . . the post-war
          theme is similar: abandon tradition,
          experiment wi...
Source:   “In all these movements. . . the post-war
          theme is similar: abandon tradition,
          experiment wi...
Source:    “In all these movements. . . the post-war
           theme is similar: abandon tradition,
           experiment...
Source:    “In all these movements. . . the post-war
           theme is similar: abandon tradition,
           experiment...
Source:    “In all these movements. . . the post-war
           theme is similar: abandon tradition,
           experiment...
Source:    “In all these movements. . . the post-war
           theme is similar: abandon tradition,
           experiment...
The Golden Rule of Documentation:

         When in doubt, cite!

Unless the idea that you are
expressing is entirely your...
How do we document
            sources?
•   All sources--books, magazines, newspapers,
    recordings, interviews, televis...
The Internet

•   Free access does not mean free
    material!

•   Most internet sources are
    copyrighted!

•   Materi...
“In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is
similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the
unknown, change the rul...
Yes, dead authors get credit, too!
Helpful Hints
•   Include your documentation in your first draft. It’s easy to
    lose track of what you have used. Docume...
Remember:
You are responsible for your paper!
Remember:
You are responsible for your paper!

Don’t be careless!
Remember:
You are responsible for your paper!

Don’t be careless!
Don’t be lazy!
Remember:
You are responsible for your paper!

Don’t be careless!
Don’t be lazy!
Don’t be late!
Remember:
You are responsible for your paper!

Don’t be careless!
Don’t be lazy!
Don’t be late!

       Be an honest and c...
Useless Excuses

•   I forgot

•   I lost my list

•   I didn’t think I had to turn in my sources

•   I meant to turn it ...
Plagiarism and the Honor
              Code
•   When a case of plagiarism is reported, the Honor
    Council Faculty Advis...
•   If the defendant is found guilty of plagiarism by a
    unanimous vote, the HC recommends
    punishment.

•   The Hea...
Don’t Be A Thief!

Be An Honest Scholar!
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
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Plagiarism

  1. 1. Plagiarism or, How Not to Steal from Other Writers Ann P. Linder, Ph.D. The Montgomery Academy
  2. 2. Word Origins: Latin: plagiarius, a kidnapper; also, as used by the Roman author Martial, a literary thief. French, 16th century: plagiaire, a plagiarist The word first appears in English in 1681, in Diatribe 23 of Montagu: “Were you afraid to bee challenged for plagiarisme?” Oxford English Dictionary, p. 932
  3. 3. Why do we document sources?
  4. 4. Why do we document sources? • Published--and in some cases, unpublished--work is intellectual property. Using a source without crediting the author and publisher is theft. A writer can be sued for stealing from another writer’s work. • We all stand on the shoulders of giants. We owe our predecessors credit for their work. • Documentation keeps us honest. It allows other researchers to check the validity of an argument.
  5. 5. Plagiarism in modern America: The sad case of Kaavya Viswanathan
  6. 6. Spring 2006 • After accusations that she had plagiarized passages in her novel from authors Megan McCafferty and Meg Cabot, Viswanathan, a student at Harvard, apologized for similarities, and promised changes for future print runs. • Not good enough, responded publisher Little, Brown and Company. • Opal Mehta was permanently withdrawn, and Viswanathan’s two-book deal cancelled.
  7. 7. Other famous authors who have been accused of plagiariam: • Alex Haley, Roots • Stephen Ambrose, The Wild Blue • Dan Brown, The Da Vinci Code
  8. 8. Using Sources
  9. 9. Source: “In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization. . .” Example:
  10. 10. Source: “In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization. . .” Example: It is clear that in all these movements the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization.
  11. 11. Source: “In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization. . .” Example:
  12. 12. Source: “In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization. . .” Example: All these movements have thoughts in common: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, and expose the sham of western civilization.
  13. 13. Source: “In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization. . .” Example:
  14. 14. Source: “In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization. . .” Example: You can see similar ideas in all the art movements after World War I. Artists were supposed to avoid tradition and rules, try new and different stuff, and show that their own civilization was fake.
  15. 15. The Golden Rule of Documentation: When in doubt, cite! Unless the idea that you are expressing is entirely yours in every detail, credit your sources!
  16. 16. How do we document sources? • All sources--books, magazines, newspapers, recordings, interviews, television and radio programs and websites--must be documented. • There are a number of respected style manuals. MA uses the Modern Language Association (MLA) style. • Follow your teacher’s guides and recommendations.
  17. 17. The Internet • Free access does not mean free material! • Most internet sources are copyrighted! • Material from the internet is the same as material from a book-- it’s just a screen instead of a page.
  18. 18. “In all these movements. . . the post-war theme is similar: abandon tradition, experiment with the unknown, change the rules, dare to be different, innovate, and above all, expose the sham of western civilization. . .” (Kreis 9). Works Cited Kreis, Steven. “The Age of Anxiety: Europe in the 1920s (1).” The History Guide. 28 Feb 2006. 3 July 2006. <http:// historyguide.org/europe/lecture8/html>
  19. 19. Yes, dead authors get credit, too!
  20. 20. Helpful Hints • Include your documentation in your first draft. It’s easy to lose track of what you have used. Documenting as you go will help you to keep everything in order. • When you are writing your outline, include the names of your sources in the margin. When you write your first draft, it will be easier to find that terrific quotation you wanted to use. • Recheck your documentation with the sources before finalizing your last draft.
  21. 21. Remember: You are responsible for your paper!
  22. 22. Remember: You are responsible for your paper! Don’t be careless!
  23. 23. Remember: You are responsible for your paper! Don’t be careless! Don’t be lazy!
  24. 24. Remember: You are responsible for your paper! Don’t be careless! Don’t be lazy! Don’t be late!
  25. 25. Remember: You are responsible for your paper! Don’t be careless! Don’t be lazy! Don’t be late! Be an honest and careful scholar! Give credit where credit is due!
  26. 26. Useless Excuses • I forgot • I lost my list • I didn’t think I had to turn in my sources • I meant to turn it in • My computer crashed • My printer ate it
  27. 27. Plagiarism and the Honor Code • When a case of plagiarism is reported, the Honor Council Faculty Advisor examines the evidence, and the Advisor, the president of the HC and the school director together determine whether the case should be passed on to the HC. • The HC conducts a hearing, during which the members examine the evidence and hear from the defendant and any pertinent witnesses.
  28. 28. • If the defendant is found guilty of plagiarism by a unanimous vote, the HC recommends punishment. • The Headmaster determines all punishments . • The punishment for plagiarism, as mandated in the Constitution of the Honor Code, is a zero on the work.
  29. 29. Don’t Be A Thief! Be An Honest Scholar!

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