Creating the Multiplayer Classroom

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Games are being explored as an educational resource at all levels of education and training. But, the right games can be difficult to find and integrate, and even more difficult to create. Join this session to learn how to change your entire classroom into a game without programming, graphics or even computers.

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Creating the Multiplayer Classroom

  1. 1. Everyone has an F . . . unless . . . Monday, February 10, 2013
  2. 2. LTMS Harrisburg UniversityAndy PetroskiDirector of Learning TechnologiesAssistant Professor of LearningTechnologiesHarrisburg University CAE&LT@apetroskiapetroski.wikispaces.com
  3. 3. What is? Why do it?What are the results? What does it look like?
  4. 4. GamificationThe use of game design techniques andmechanics to solve problems and engageaudiences. Typically gamification applies tonon-game applications and processes.*Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamification)
  5. 5. MMORPGMassively Multiplayer Online Role Playing GameMMOGMassively Multiplayer Online Game
  6. 6. MMORPG 12 million+ Top business executives, high performers and entrepreneurs have all praised WoW for its ability to teach skills that can be easily and effortless transferred into the business market and any career or managerial and team role.
  7. 7. World of Warcraft Non-Educational EducationalFantasy Story PlanningBattles TeamworkMarketplace Strategy Use of Resources Feedback
  8. 8. Multiplayer Classroom XP Lands Levels Raids Avatar MMORPG Elements Crafting Guilds Quests Zones Roles
  9. 9. Why Change? (General)Multiplayer Classroom Classroom Student-centered Teacher-centered Immersive (Fun) Engaging Collaborative ConversationalLots of opportunities Failure is damaging Ongoing Feedback Limited Feedback
  10. 10. Why Change? (Specific) LTMS 510 LTMS 510 MPC Teacher-centered Student-centered Whole group Individualized Focus on topics Focus on explorationStep-by-step / linear Connected topicsReading / Discuss / Explore / Activity / Activity Discuss
  11. 11. MPC vs. Classroom What’s it look like?
  12. 12. Marked Tree High School (Biology) Before - December 2009, 62% of sophomores taking Biology were passing with a D or higher, 10% of whom had an A or B. After – December 2010, 98% of sophomores taking Biology were passing with a D or higher, 36% of whom had an A or B. End of quarter test 1 (9 weeks of questing) o 2009 – students were 29% proficient or higher on the exam o 2010 – 68% were proficient or advanced End of quarter test 2 o 2009 – 31% proficient or advanced o 2010 – 81% proficient or advanced Advanced o 2009 – 3% of students scoring advanced o 2010 – 55% of students scoring advanced
  13. 13. Velencia College: United States History to 1877 Increased engagement, but grades were only slightly stronger Students were more prepared for class Level chart gave students their status in the class. Previously, he believes most students didn’t know how they were performing in the class – even some who were passing choosing to withdrawal. 81% did a “B” or better in preparation. Historically, that’s 50%
  14. 14. Robert Louis Stevenson Middle School: General Math Increased engagement in all activities Less focus on the grade After multiplayer classroom, 30% of students who had a grade letter of C or below, had increased their grade to a B or higher
  15. 15. What is? Why do it?What are the results? What does it look like?
  16. 16. Questions / Comments
  17. 17. LTMS Harrisburg UniversityAndy PetroskiDirector of Learning TechnologiesAssistant Professor of LearningTechnologiesHarrisburg University CAE&LT@apetroskiapetroski.wikispaces.com
  18. 18. Everyone has an F . . . unless . . . Monday, February 10, 2013

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