Sun Protection

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Learn how to protect yourself from the sun and reduce your risks of sun damage and skin cancer.

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Sun Protection

  1. 1. Sun Protection<br />Afreen Pappa, MD<br />JAVᾹNI Med Spa<br />March 29, 2008<br />Fort Bend Teen Service League<br />
  2. 2. Goals<br />At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will:<br />Understand the effect of UV rays on skin<br />Be able to both define SPF and know the minimum recommended value for SPF<br />Identifyrisk factors for sun damage<br />Identify ways to reduce the risk of sun damage<br />List things that minimize risk of sun damage<br />
  3. 3. Why is sun protection important?<br />What are the benefits of sunlight?<br />What are the risks?<br />
  4. 4. How many of you use a form of sun protection when at the:<br />Beach<br />Park<br />Afterschool activities<br />Walking the dog<br />
  5. 5. Let’s see what you know (or don’t)<br />1. If you use plenty of sunscreen, you can stay in the sun as long as you'd like.<br />A. True<br />B. False<br />
  6. 6. 2. Which of the following surfaces reflects<br />ultraviolet rays?<br />A. Snow<br />B. Sand<br />C. Ice<br />D. Water<br />E. All of the above<br />
  7. 7. 3. You don't need to protect or cover your skin<br />on cloudy days.<br />True<br />False<br />
  8. 8. 4. Wearing white during hot weather protects you from sun damage because light-colored clothing reflects light, rather than absorbing it.<br />True <br />False<br />
  9. 9. 5. Choose a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least:<br />5<br />10<br />15<br />30<br />
  10. 10. 6. Darker lenses on sunglasses offer better protection from ultraviolet rays than do lighter sunglass lenses.<br />True <br />False<br />
  11. 11. 7. Sunbathing or sun tanning once in a while won't hurt your skin.<br />True <br />False<br />
  12. 12. 8. The darker your skin color, the less you need to worry about sun protection.<br />True <br />False<br />
  13. 13. Physics<br />Sunlight<br />Total spectrum of the Electromagnetic Radiation given off by the sun<br />Electromagnetic Radiation<br />The full range of wavelengths that makeup light (visible and non-visible)<br />Light waves are fluctuations of electric and magnetic fields<br />
  14. 14. Electromagnetic Spectrum<br />
  15. 15. Ultraviolet Rays<br />Band of sun rays<br />5% of sunlight that reaches the earth<br />Reflects off of water, snow, sand and ice<br />Three types<br />UVA<br />UVB<br />UVC<br />
  16. 16. UVA<br />90% reaches the earth on a cloudy day<br />Not blocked by window glass<br />Penetrates light clothing<br />Penetrates deeper into the skin<br />Has more long-term effects than UVB<br />
  17. 17. UVB<br />“B” for burn<br />Cloud cover provides some protection<br />Intensity varies <br />Time of day<br />Season<br />Altitude<br />Weather<br />
  18. 18. UVC<br />Most rays are absorbed by the earth’s atmosphere<br />More dangerous than UVA and UVB<br />Causes serious damage to DNA<br />
  19. 19. How does Ultraviolet Radiation affect the skin?<br />Sunburns -- the most common and acute response <br />Photoaging – the leading cause of skin aging; damage begins as early as in one’s 20’s<br />Cancer – ultraviolet radiation is a known carcinogen (cancer causing agent)<br />The effect is cumulative; the more time spent unprotected in the sun over your lifetime, the greater the risks.<br />
  20. 20. Melanin<br />Skin’s protective sun filter<br />Natural pigment<br />Acts as a shield against the sun’s ultraviolet rays<br />Greater in populations that live in area with greater sun intensity (Africa, Latin America, India)<br />
  21. 21. Skin type<br />
  22. 22.
  23. 23.
  24. 24. Skin Cancer<br />The most common form of cancer in the US<br />1 million new cases are diagnosed yearly<br />1 in 5 Americans and 1 in 3 Caucasians will develop skin cancer in their lifetime<br />>90% of all skin cancers are caused by sun exposure<br />The risk for skin cancer doubles if a person has had 5 or more sunburns<br />
  25. 25. Tanning Beds<br />Newer high pressure sun lamps can emit UVR in doses 15 times that of the sun<br />Occasional use of tanning beds almost triples the chance of developing melanoma – the deadliest form of skin cancer; the use of tanning beds before the age of 35 increases the risk for melanoma by 75%<br />People who use tanning beds are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell cancer and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell cancer<br />On an average day, more than 1 million people in the US tan in tanning salons; 70% are Caucasian women ages 16-49.<br />
  26. 26. Who is at risk?<br />Everyone<br />
  27. 27. EVERYONe<br />
  28. 28. SPF -- Sun Protection Factor<br />A rating system developed by the FDA to describe the level of sun protection provided by a sunscreen<br />For example: an SPF of 30 allows an individual to stay out in the sun 30 times as long as without the sunscreen before developing the same reddening of the skin.<br />
  29. 29. Sunscreen<br />SPF 15 blocks approximately 93 percent of all incoming ultraviolet rays<br />SPF 30 blocks 97 percent<br />SPF 50 blocks 99 percent<br />AAD and the Skin Cancer Foundation recommend a minimum SPF of 15<br />Reapply every 2 hours (even on cloudy days), especially after swimming or sweating<br />
  30. 30. Sunscreen Recommendations<br />Broad spectrum providing protection from<br />UVA<br />UVB<br />Apply 30 minutes before sun exposure<br />Reapply every 2 hours<br />Reapply immediately after swimming, toweling off or excess sweating<br />Use 1 ounce each time <br />
  31. 31. Sunscreens<br />Physical<br />Made of zinc oxide and titanium dioxide<br />Protect against UVA and UVB<br />Prevent rays from being absorbed<br />Chemical<br />Mexoryl protects against UVA and UVB<br />Avobenzoneor Oxybenzone protect against UVA OR UVB<br />Absorb rays before they can do damage<br />
  32. 32.
  33. 33. Sunscreens<br />Cream formulations <br />Contribute to destruction of coral reefs due to chemicals<br />Mineral based sun protection (Colorescience® Sunforgettable) do not have chemicals that affect the environment<br />
  34. 34. Skin Cancer Foundation Recommends<br />Window film<br />Sunscreens with UVA and UVB protection<br />Sunglasses with UVA and UVB protection<br />Self tanners<br />Sun protective clothing and fabric<br />Makeup, lip balm and moisturizers with a sunscreen<br />Umbrellas<br />For more information and to learn more about the “Go With Your Own Glow” campaign go to www.skincancer.org<br />
  35. 35. Let’s see what you know<br />1. If you use plenty of sunscreen, you can stay in the sun as long as you'd like.<br />False<br />
  36. 36. 2. Which of the following surfaces reflects<br />ultraviolet rays?<br />All of the above<br />
  37. 37. 3. You don't need to protect or cover your skin<br />on cloudy days.<br />False<br />
  38. 38. 4. Wearing white during hot weather protects you from sun damage because light-colored clothing reflects light, rather than absorbing it.<br />False<br />
  39. 39. 5. Choose a sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of at least:<br />15 <br />
  40. 40. 6. Darker lenses on sunglasses offer better protection from ultraviolet rays than do lighter sunglass lenses.<br />False<br />
  41. 41. 7. Sunbathing or sun tanning once in a while won't hurt your skin.<br />False<br />
  42. 42. 8. The darker your skin color, the less you need to worry about sun protection.<br />False<br />
  43. 43. Resources<br />www.skincancer.org<br />www.aad.org<br />www.<br />

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