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Raised Eyebrows

LANGUAGE 3
Exposed Palms / I N1/_/ /~, 

lluncherl
Shoulders
IDoNfi
KNOW on
J UNDERSTAND
wHAT’$ INSIDE
9- - "— — -«(I/ -‘: :)

Hand-Tn-Face  
Gestures   - - — -. 

  

A :  .
Framework 6- - Arm Barriers
For Hand...
most researchers generang agree
that rhe verbar channel is used
primarilg for converging informafion.
whlle the non—verbal channel ls used for negollafrng
lnrerpersonal arrlrudes,  and ln some cases ls used as
a subsllrure f...
the acoulsltlon of
knowledge and
stalls in non-verbal
communication
serves to make
everg encounter
with another
person an ...
it is good to learn and to
use positive open gestures
to communicate with
others and to eliminate
gestures that mag give
_...
'  , 

this can make it more
comfortable to be with
people and can make gou
more acceptable to them.
I i

A Framework for Understanding
Q
sonr BASICS

M031’ Of the basic communication
g¢S1'W6S M2 TN SMVM all OWY
the world
: ' A7‘ ~ A
: ;lll. I li: ".IiiiII =   a

MOST OT TVO basic communication
QOSTWOS are TVO same all OVOY
the WOYIJ. 

 

wh...
. J
‘ .4‘.  ;
. . - -ht 4.. 
p. 
i ‘A -‘A;  A run
_r nunrv »- . -
’ 4/-
,  ‘ . »~
H"  out

on the other hand,  just as AT/...
.1
T —
ll  ‘

 

 .  ,'  ‘.  AT ’>. .. '.a. ”~, “*. ~;“ pi? .:i. ;
 . l  ‘‘‘‘*i.  ‘r;  . 7  = ‘?E¢. ":~: ;l; i  l*v  -

wh...
one Of’ the MOST serious mistakes a fiOViOe in bOdig
language can make TS TO interpret a solitarg gesture
ifl isolation OT’...
FOY example.  scratching the head can mean a number OT
ThTllgS.  depending Oll the other gestures that OOOUY at the
same t...
Like ang other language,  bodg language consists
~  of words.  sentences and punctuation.
Like ang other language,  bodg language consists
~  of words.  sentences and punctuation. 

:7" each gesture is like a sin...
Like ang other language,  bodg language consists
N‘ of words,  sentences and punctuation. 

  

each gesture is like a sin...
Like ang other language,  bodg language consists
5*  of words,  sentences and punctuation. 

    
  

each gesture is like...
the ‘perceptive’ person is one who can read the non-verbal
sentences and accuratelg match them against the person's
verbal...
:: lltlH: lIlill: }

when someone speaks of the truth,  his/ her words
or verbal sentences ought to be congruent to
his/ h...
According to Dr.  Albert ulehrabian (a prominent psgchologist
who has done extensive studies on
the subject of non-verbal ...
Research shows that non-verbal signals carrg
about five times as much impact as the verbal
channel and that when

the two ...
Research shows that non-verbal signals carrg
about five times as much impact as the verbal
channel and that when

the two ...
observation 01° gesture clusters
and congruence 01° the verbal
and non-verbal channels are the
kegs TO accurate interpreta...
t . ,u -.  N I‘
‘ i
l
I . 
l lA
‘ . 
. l * “A
l:  ’ v '
. p ‘

e
f  in addition to looking for gesture clusters
» and cong...
If,  for example,  someone was
sitting at a bus terminal with
arms and/ or legs tightlg crossed
and chin down and it was a...
if.  however,  a
person used the
same gestures
while gou were
sitting across a
table from
him/ her trging
to sell him/ her...
the speed of some gestures and how obvious
theg look to others is also related to the age of
the indii/ ldl/ all.
the speed of some gestures and how obvious
theg look to others is also related to the age of

the indii/ ldl/ all. 

For e...
when the teenager
tells a lie,  the hand is
brought to the mouth
like that of a five-
gear—old,  but instead
of the obviou...
when the adult tells a lie,  her hand covers her mouth in an
attempt to block the deceitful words,  , 
but at the last mom...
when the adult tells a lie,  her hand covers her mouth in an
attempt to block the deceitful words, 

but at the last momen...
this is an example of the fact that,  as an individual
gets older,  mang of his gestures become sophisticated
and less obv...
Palm Gestures
V
oneness & uoilrsrr

one of the most
valuable wags of
discovering whether
someone is being
open and honest or
not is to l...
dust as a dog Will expose its throat to show
submission or surrender to the victor,  so the
human animal uses his or her p...
when someone begins to open up or
be truthful,  he will expose all or part
of his palms to another person.
9'; 

Like most bodg language.  this is
a completelg unconscious gesture. 
one that gives gou a feeling or
hunch that the ...
when a person is
lging or concealing
something,  his palms
are hidden behind his
back,  in his pockets
or in an arm fold
p...
it is possible to make
gourself appear more
credible bg practising
open palm gestures
when communicating
WlTh others;
it is possible to make
gourself appear more
credible bg practising
open palm gestures
when communicating
WlTh others; 

co...
lnterestinglg,  most people find it difficult
to lie with their palms exposed and the
use of palm signals can in fact help...
lnterestinglg,  most people find it difficult
to lie with their palms exposed and the
use of palm signals can in fact help...
9
PAL nowrn

one of the least noticed but most
powerful non—verbal signals is
given bg the human palm.
9
PAL nowrn ,  — - ~ ~. 

one of the least noticed but most " » A - ‘. 
powerful non—verbal signals is 
given bg the human...
9
PAL nowrn ,  — - ~ ~. 

one of the least noticed but most " ~ - .  - ‘. 
powerful non—verbal signals is 
given bg the hu...
THE PALM-UP POSITION

The palm facing up is used as a submissive, 
non-threatening gesture,  reminiscent of the
pleading g...
THE PALM-TIP POSITION

The palm facing up is used as a submissive, 
non-threatening gesture,  reminiscent of the
pleading ...
THE PALM-UP POSITION
The palm facing up is used as a submissive, 

non-threatening gesture,  reminiscent of the
pleading g...
The pointed finger is one at
the most irritating gestures
that a person can use while
speaking, par1tcularlg when
it beats...
the pointed finger is one at
the most irritating gestures
that a person can use while
speaking,  particutartg when
it beat...
Hand 8. Arm Gestures
Rl| BB| NG HANDS Rubbing the hands together is a
wag in which people non—verballg
communicate positive expectation.
The speed at which a
person rubs his palms
together signals whom
he thinks Will receive the
positive results that are

exp...
sag,  for example,  gov want to bug a home and gov go
to see a real estate agent.
sag,  for example,  gou want to bug a home and gou go
to see a real estate agent. 

After describing the propertg gou
are ...
sag,  for example,  gou want to bug a home and gou go
to see a real estate agent. 

After describing the propertg gou

are...
but how would gou feel if she rubbed her palms
together verg slowlg as she told

gou that she had the

/ ' ideal propertg?
but how would gou feel if she rubbed her palms

together verg slowlg as she told
gou that she had the
/ ' ideal propertg? ...
sales people are taught that if theg use the palm rub
gesture when describing products or services to prospective
bugers, ...
when the buger rubs her palms together and sags to the
sales person,  ‘Lets see what gou have to often’,  it is a
signal t...
A word of warning: 

A person who is standing
at a bus terminal in
freezing winter conditions
and who rubs his palms
toget...
?L. §§l| ?}I| [5.l?  Il: ll| l3e‘%

 

According to master negotiators, 

Nierenberg and Calero,  the hands-
clenched posi...
the QOSTVYO has 7- main POSlTTOflS= 

Hands clenched in front
or close to the face.
‘;  Hands clenched in front
, ’ or close to the face. 

,  s I
cl:  I /1 7' 
_ -— ’ I _ _- T 
’ 
’ - “ 
’ i
.  l , 
Hands ...
a correlation between the
height at which the  
hands are held and the =  ‘
strength of the person's
negative mood - that ...
STEEPLINO HANDS

People who are confident, 
superior tgpes or who use
minimal or restricted bodg
gestures often use this g...
this fascinating gesture
is freopenttg used in
superior/ subordinate

interaction and that it
can be an isolated

gesture ...
this fascinating gesture
is freguenttg used in
superior/ subordinate

interaction and that it

can be an isolated
gesture ...
g X

Q, » -
/  
/ Ti 
I

THE RAISED STEEPIE
This position is normally taken when the steeplcr is giving his opinions or id...
THE IIIWERED STEEPIE
This gesture is normally used when the steepler is listening rather than speaking. 

2..  :5: ,  4

 ...
Although the steeple gesture is a
positive signal,  it can be used in
either positive or negative
circumstances,  and mag ...
For example,  a salesman is presenting
his product to a potential buger. 

I/ '

7%-1,’ ' . 
I >.  ‘I
7 .     “x
, . 
 V ....
For example,  a salesman is presenting
his product to a potential buger. 

 

towards the end of the sales presentation th...
if the steeple follows a series of positive gestures like
open palms,  leaning forward,  head up,  etc. ,

 I .   /  
 / I...
if the steeple follows a series of positive gestures like
open palms,  leaning forward,  head up,  etc. ,

 

which appear...
if the steeple follows a series of positive gestures like
open podms,  leaning forward,  head up,  etc. ,

 

which appear...
on the other hand,  if the steeple gesture follows a series of
negative gestures such as arm folding,  leg crossing,  look...
on the other hand,  if the steeple gesture follows a series of
negative gestures such as arm folding,  leg crossing,  look...
in both these cases the steeple gesture means
confidence,  but one has positive results and the
other negative conseopence...
In b0Th these cases the steeple gesture means
confidence,  bVI' one has positive results and the
other negative consequenc...
Q
IIRIPPING HANDS,  wiiisis & Anus

one palm gripping
the other hand
behind the back
is a superioritg/ 
confidence
gesture...
V
IIRIPPINO HANDS,  WRISTS & ARMS

one palm gripping
the other hand
behind the back
is a superioritg/ 
confidence
gesture ...
lf gou take this position when gou are in
a high stress situation,  such as being
interviewed bg newspaper reporters or
si...
the palm—in-palm gesture should not be confused with
the hand—gripping—wrist gesture,  which is a signal of
frustration an...
the palm—in-palm gesture should not be confused with
the hand—gripping—wrist gesture,  which is a signal of
frustration an...
lnterestinglg,  the further the
hand is moved up the back, 
the more angrg the person
has become.
lnterestinglg,  the further the
hand is moved up the back, 
the more angrg the person
has become. 

Also,  the further the...
lnterestinglg,  the further the
hand is moved up the back, 
the more angrg the person
has become. 

Also,  the further the...
C
THMB DISPLAYS

thumbs most often protrude
from people's pockets,  sometimes
from the back pockets in a
secretive manner ...
9
THMB DISPLAYS

thumbs most often protrude
from people's pockets,  sometimes
from the back pockets in a
secretive manner ...
Arms folded vwrh thumbs pointing
upwourds is another popvlaur fhvmb
gesture posifion.
Arms folded with thumbs pointing
upwards is another popular thumb
gesture position. 

this is a double signal,  being
that...
Hand-To-Face Gestures
Recognition of the non-verbal deceit gestures can be one
of the most important observation skills one can aoguire.
/'- ‘~V‘~‘ ‘x’
. r_ . l "-  '
', ‘  . "   kt 
,  -. ‘-«. , . ‘ .  
p" '  ~. .
'  l

4’ K
 ,  '/  ’ / 
. 

one of the most ...
the hand—to—face actions
 depicted form the basis of
.  the human deceit gestures.
the hand—to—face actions
 depicted form the basis of
.  the human deceit gestures. 

 

It - -s .  in other words,  when w...
when someone uses a hand—to-
face gesture,  it does not alwags
mean that he or she is lging.
when someone uses a hand—to-
face gesture,  it does not alwags
mean that he or she is lging. 

it does,  however,  indicat...
when someone uses a hand-to-
face gesture,  it does not alwags
mean that he or she is lging. 

it does,  however,  indicat...
THE MOUTH GUARD

‘the mouth guard is one of
the few adult gestures that
is as obvious as a child's.  the
hand covers the m...
sometimes this gesture mag onlg be several fingers
over the mouth or ev ,  i fist,  but its meaning
7 ‘ remains the same.
sometimes this gesture mag onlg be several fingers
over the mouth or even 4 '9. fist,  but its meaning
 " remains the same...
if,  however,  he covers
his mouth while gou
are speaking,  it
indicates that he
feels gou are lging! 

Photo:  T: voi: !j...
t illtti’ 'illl: ::| |lItl

in essence,  the nose touch gesture is
a sophisticated,  disguised version of
the mouth guard ...
l liii: ;r 'iili: ::iiliii 

in essence,  the nose touch gesture is :77 .  .. ,, ,  
a sophisticated,  disguised version o...
V  " ' T M some women perform
. . T A s e~       this gesture with small
I. ‘ p T .   .  discreet strokes to

T W ' ‘ , ,s...
x T I"

1‘ . 
 . ' l p ‘l t. 

79' - T ”

‘ ‘ ‘A _ V A

' ‘ ' .  e 

. ,,< «K , 

.  V,  V  I

f “~. .
1% Z T

one explana...
“but what if the person onlg has an itchg nose? ’
is freguenttg asked
‘but what if the person onlg has an itchg nose? ’
is freguenttg asked

the itch in a person's nose
is normallg satisfied b...
Like the mouth guard gesture,  it can be
used both bg the speaker to disguise his
own deceit and bg the listener who doubt...
this gesture is the
brain's attempt to
block out the deceit. 
doubt or lie that it sees
or to avoid having to
look at the ...
. 4.7‘

‘ ‘T " .7 / ,3’ V i it
'97 J  .  -i-r l
til T . ..r-" '-‘. 

Men usuallg Yllb their eges / ig0Y0lISiig and if the ...
Photo:  bod}‘la. ng'usgep rot ect.  c 0 In

women use a small, 
gentte rubbing motion

just below the ego, 

either becaus...
Photo:  bod}‘lang'usgeP rot ect.  c o in

women use a small, 
gentte rubbing motion

just below the ego, 

either because ...
9
THEEAR RIJB

, '.f ' - Photo:  i: vo&_*. 'i. anguageproject. com

this is,  in effect,  an attempt bg the listener to ‘h...
.
. 
I
,  .
. 
'_ / 
I. 

this is the sophisticated adult version of the hands-
over—both—ears gesture used bg the goung c...
T‘;  J it i.  I
other variations of the ear rub K T ; 

gesture include rubbing the back  
of the ear,  the finger drill (...
T‘;  J it i.  I
other variations of the ear rub K T ; 

gesture include rubbing the back  
of the ear,  the finger drill (...
V "I '  "'l| V' Ull "'nll
T IT TIJII 'l| liT: n ‘II

in ThiS case,  the index

finger of the writing .1“

hand scratches b...
observations of this
gesture reveals an
interesting point: 

the person usuallg
scratches about 5
times Rarelg is the
numb...
ThiS gesture iS a signal OT dOVbT OY uncertaintg
and TS characteristic OT’ the person WhO sags, 
‘I'M not sure i agree. ’
...
i ‘i’ : :ii.  .: ii "ll,   ’

Research into the

gestures of those who 
tell lies revealed that the e,  ,
telling of a lie...
this seems to be a reasonable explanation of whg
some people use the collar pull gesture when theg tell a
lie and suspect ...
it is almost as if the lie
causes a slight trickle of

sweat to form on the
neck when the deceiver
feels that gou suspect ...
when igOU see someone use ThiS gesture,  guestions like -

Ti‘

 that,  please? 

  would ou re eat   
(l ‘t P
l

 that point,  please? !/pi  that,  please? 

when igOU see someone use ThiS gesture,  questions like -

>"“.   W  »,  ,...
when igOU see someone use ThiS gesture,  questions like -

/ ' *‘‘“~~«. _

_ , ‘wAr _:  Q
R.  as
by _ 
‘».  x

 liiou clar...
this gesture is also used when
a person is feeling angrg or
frustrated and needs to pull
the collar awag from his neck
in ...
T iiitilii iiiiiiiiiiiiii‘.  ii'§: l| 3i. ,:l""| i|ii

An exaggerated version of
the collar pull gesture is the
palm rubbi...
T iiitilii iiiiiiiiiiiiii‘.  ii'§: l| 3i. ,:l""| i|ii

An exaggerated version of
the collar pull gesture is the
palm rubbi...
this gesture is also used as
a signal of frustration or

anger and,  when this is   _. 
the case,  the hand slaps “   “

t...
Let us assume,  for example.  that gou asked
a subordinate to complete a certain task for
gou and that the subordinate had...
Let us assume,  for example.  that gou asked
a subordinate to complete a certain task for
gou and that the subordinate had...
Although slapping of the head communicates
forgetfulness,  the person signals how he feels
/    .  about gou or the situat...
’  ‘N If he slaps his forehead he
V 1‘ . ~ signals that he is not

' intimidated bg gour having

mentioned his forgetfulne...
if he slaps his forehead he
 5 signals that he is not

Y intimidated bg gour having
 mentioned his forgetfulness, 
;. 

bu...
those WhO habituallg rub the
backs OT’ their necks have a. 
tendencg T0 be negative or
critical,
7 .5. those who habituallg rub the
* i 7'“ ‘pl backs of their necks have a
 i , i-.  tendencg to be negative or
 ~ critica...
t R-'lli. ~ii£: :: i "ll i'iliii": 

when a person is under pressure,  the
fingers are placed in the mouth .
whereas most hand—to-mouth gestures involve lging or
deception,  the fingers-in-mouth gesture is an outward
manifestation ...
whereas most hand—to-mouth gestures involve lging or
deception,  the fingers-in-mouth gesture is an outward
manifestation ...
Arm Barriers
V
FlllEll ARMS

 

Hiding behind a barrier iS a
normal human response that
we learn at an earlg age TO
protect ourselves.
tag folding one or both arms across
the chest,  a barrier is formed that
is,  in essence,  at attempt to block
out the imp...
tag folding one or both arms across
the chest,  a barrier is formed that
is,  in essence,  at attempt to block
out the imp...
v
STADARO ARM-CROSS

the standard arm-cross gesture
is a universal gesture signifging
the same defensive or negative
attit...
__ .  _‘ ,   . ' 2 . 
If i / i ii.  ‘:1 r. _»
‘. ‘ _-‘I r ' i. ‘ v ,  ‘
.  . /   

,  /T - J _ , 
i .   , =
/ i  . . l ‘ /...
when gou see the , 
arm-cross gesture

_,  occur during a face-
/ . to—face encounter,
I when gou see the
5- arm-cross gesture

I ‘ occur during a face-
to-face encounter, 

/ 



it is reasonable to assume th...
when gou see the -
:  arm-cross gesture ‘ r
I ‘ occur during a face-
to-face encounter, 

/ 



it is reasonable to assume...
the fact is that the non-verbal
medium does not lie;  the
verbal medium does. 

      
    
  

N0, I'm not
angrg at all. ...
the fact is that the non-verbal 

medium does not lie 5 the _  ’“‘*; «:. ... ,pi. .. 
verbal medium does.   No,  I'm not  ...
Remember:  As long as the arms-folded gesture remains, 
the negative attitude will remain.  the attitude causes the
gestur...
A simple but effective method
of breaking the folded-arms
position is to hand the person

a pen,  a book or something
that...
A simple but effective method
of breaking the folded-arms
position is to hand the person

a pen,  a book or something
that...
Asking the person to lean forward to look at a
visual presentation can also be an effective

" means of opening the folded...
iiiiiitoieroiiiiiii-iss  

 i i
I i I ' - i .  ' ~ i, 
i .  ~ ' - - . _
 i .  ,, ,, . .
I """" . .
,  hp .  . .  , ‘ ‘I
i
...
’IhiS cluster IS

often combined
with clenched
teeth and red

face,  in which

case a verbal or
phgsical attack

mag be im...
this cluster is

 - often combined

‘* with clenched
teeth and red
face,  in which

/ “N ‘ case averbal or
sical attack
be...
I I) III | "' I Hill’: -i
ill I'i 1‘iiiii"'-ll-'-l iiiillll . II'

the full arm-cross gesture is
sometimes too obvious to ...
9
i>iiiitiiii Aiiii-eiiiiss BARRIERS

the full arm-cross gesture is
sometimes too obvious to use

around others because iT...
the partial arm
barrier is often seen
at meetings where
a person mag be a
stranger to the
group or is lacking in
self-conf...
Another popular version of a partial arm barrier is holding

hands with oneself,  a gesture commonlg used bg people who
st...
Renowned ethologist and author,  Desmond i/ lorris,  said
that this gesture allows a person to relive the emotional
securi...
IIISGIIISEII ARM-CROSS ‘H
E

Disguised arm-cross t
gestures are highlig

sophisticated gestures
used bg people who are
con...
I I
”‘i"r~ i 1* i

this group includes politicians,  sales people,  television
personalities and the like who do not want ...
Like out arm-cross gestures, 
one arm swings across in
front of the bodg to grasp
the other arm but instead of
the arms fo...
Like all arm-cross gestures, 
one arm swings across in
front of the bodg to grasp
the other arm but instead of
the arms fo...
women are less obvious
than men in their use of
disguised arm barrier
gestures because theg can
grasp such things as
handb...
one of the most  . 
common versions of it 
this is holding a '  '

glass of beer or up 
wine with two  
hands.
one of the most
common versions of
this is holding a
glass of beer or
vvlne with two
hands. 

The use of two hands allows ...
Leg Barriers
V 
Like arm barrier gestures,  crossed ’  __  
legs are a signal that a negative   ‘
or defensive attitude mag exist —*~. ...
the purpose of crossing _.  L  . 
the arms on the chest
was originallg to defend
the heart and upper
bodg region and cross...
1 l r
l ',  J/ f_"_, ~ ,   ‘ / . ti
ll . -
‘ ' . ’ ,  ‘ix * . 
F’ I 5, " fir —' I,  
5 I ‘-. . >/ : I;  //  1;’ ‘  Z
,  I ’...
unfortunatelg for them, 
‘ all i however,  the gesture can

 

 l make them seem defensive. 
2 Mi"
4 l;
V

1- — ‘- 0 
STANDARD LEG CRITSS

1
6

one leg is crossed neattg over the other,  usuallg
the right over the left,  and m...
However,  this is usuallg a
supportive gesture that
occurs with other negative
gestures and should not be
interpreted in i...
when the crossed legs gesture is combined with
crossed arms,  the person has withdrawn from
the conversation.
This pose is popular among
women in most countries, 
particularlg to show their

displeasure with a husband

or bogfriend
9
THEFIDDRE 4 LED LUCK

 

this leg cross indicates
that an argumentative
or competitive attitude
exists and is the sittin...
9
THEFIGURE 4 LED CLAMP

the person who has a
hard and fast attitude in
an argument or debate
will often lock the figure
4...
9
THEFIGURE 4 LED CLAMP

the person who has a
hard and fast attitude in
an argument or debate
will often lock the figure
4...
9
STADING LEG CRDSS

the next time gou attend a

meeting or function,  gou will

notice small groups of people

all standi...
9
STADING LEG CRDSS

The next time lg0U attend (L

 

meeting or function,  gou will (-3
notice small groups of people  (:...
if gou were to
question these
people,  gou would
find that one or
all of them are
strangers to the

others in the group. 
...
LET’s RECAP

0 - SomeBasics

- neriernouhuying - Eesluresclusters
- iiieiiiouiiiiiuani Arramewmk - Continence

.  NgseIouc...
LEARN MORE ON RELATED TOPIC? 

CLICK ON ANY OF THE BELOW TO OPEN THE LINK. 
(NOTE:  THE LINKS DON'T SEEM TO WORK ON MOBILE...
ideas adapted from
BODY LNl(siUA(si8

How to Read others’
Thoughts bg
Their eiestures

eg Allan Pease
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Decoding Body Language

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Body Language is one of the most important thing to know when it comes to human communication.
Learn some of the most commonly and easily identifiable non-verbal communications in this deck!

Published in: Self Improvement
  • Hey guys! Who wants to chat with me? More photos with me here 👉 http://www.bit.ly/katekoxx
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  • @Craig Hadden
    Hi Craig!
    Thank you so much for the feedback and for sharing the interesting video. I've watched it with much eagerness! ^_^
    I now have more reasons to believe that our body language can affect us physiologically, i.e. the 'outside-in' way, after looking at the empirical examples illustrated that video.
    This also helps reinforce the idea mentioned in Slide 84 of this deck, which states the effects coming out from the palm gripping gestures (which can be deliberated).
    Cheers!!
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  • I really like the analogy between spoken sentences and clusters of gestures, and the fact that both a word and a gesture can have different meanings.

    The slides about using open or closed palms really resonated with me, as well. I’ll practise using open palms more often!

    You might like this video about the effect of a person’s body language on their OWN hormone levels, too, which has a huge effect on their confidence:

    https://bitly.com/1s1oJnU
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  • @Shivanand G
    Thank you Shivanand!
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  • Knowledge full :)
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Decoding Body Language

  1. Raised Eyebrows LANGUAGE 3 Exposed Palms / I N1/_/ /~, lluncherl Shoulders IDoNfi KNOW on J UNDERSTAND
  2. wHAT’$ INSIDE 9- - "— — -«(I/ -‘: :) Hand-Tn-Face Gestures - - — -. A : . Framework 6- - Arm Barriers For Hand 8. Arm Understanding “°3t"'°5 I’ ' ‘G r ‘ ‘ ‘ -' leg Barriers
  3. most researchers generang agree that rhe verbar channel is used primarilg for converging informafion.
  4. whlle the non—verbal channel ls used for negollafrng lnrerpersonal arrlrudes, and ln some cases ls used as a subsllrure for verbal messages.
  5. the acoulsltlon of knowledge and stalls in non-verbal communication serves to make everg encounter with another person an exciting experlence.
  6. it is good to learn and to use positive open gestures to communicate with others and to eliminate gestures that mag give _. negative signals. 6 9/ .
  7. ' , this can make it more comfortable to be with people and can make gou more acceptable to them.
  8. I i A Framework for Understanding
  9. Q sonr BASICS M031’ Of the basic communication g¢S1'W6S M2 TN SMVM all OWY the world
  10. : ' A7‘ ~ A : ;lll. I li: ".IiiiII = a MOST OT TVO basic communication QOSTWOS are TVO same all OVOY the WOYIJ. when people are happg theg smile, , when theg are sad or ongrg theg s - A frown or scowt
  11. . J ‘ .4‘. ; . . - -ht 4.. p. i ‘A -‘A; A run _r nunrv »- . - ’ 4/- , ‘ . »~ H" out on the other hand, just as AT/ erbal language differs from culture to culture, so the non-verbal language mag also differ.
  12. .1 T — ll ‘ . ,' ‘. AT ’>. .. '.a. ”~, “*. ~;“ pi? .:i. ; . l ‘‘‘‘*i. ‘r; . 7 = ‘?E¢. ":~: ;l; i l*v - whereas one gesture mag be common in a particular culture and have a clear interpretation, ii’ mag be meaningless in another culture or even have a completelg opposite meaning. " IN: fi§, sF"'o"’: /ac-3 . ‘W- :77‘ p . ,—a -. ‘ . T‘; _ 41" J‘ " ~: :./ - 2} t ~ '1: 1 A ‘/ '}3~- L’ ’. '. ‘~: “' . ' I ‘ ' Q 1 ‘ I ' T ' l I 4 I
  13. one Of’ the MOST serious mistakes a fiOViOe in bOdig language can make TS TO interpret a solitarg gesture ifl isolation OT’ other gestures OY other circumstances. 5 "<5 / X, _ _. A,. ’«— 1 VA/ /‘. ‘ Q pp.
  14. FOY example. scratching the head can mean a number OT ThTllgS. depending Oll the other gestures that OOOUY at the same time, SO We MUST alwags TOOK at gesture clusters TOY a correct reading. f — — — Dandruff? e — — — Forgetfulness? — — t — — — Sweating? t — — — Uncertainty? t — — — lying?
  15. Like ang other language, bodg language consists ~ of words. sentences and punctuation.
  16. Like ang other language, bodg language consists ~ of words. sentences and punctuation. :7" each gesture is like a single word and a word mag have — T‘ several different meanings.
  17. Like ang other language, bodg language consists N‘ of words, sentences and punctuation. each gesture is like a single word and a word mag have several different meanings. it is onlg when gou put the word into a sentence with other words that gou can fullg understand its meaning
  18. Like ang other language, bodg language consists 5* of words, sentences and punctuation. each gesture is like a single word and a word mag have several different meanings. it is onlg when gou put the word into a sentence with other words that gou can fullg understand its meaning elestures come Tll ‘sentences’ and invariablg tell the truth about’ (L person's feelings OY attitudes.
  19. the ‘perceptive’ person is one who can read the non-verbal sentences and accuratelg match them against the person's verbal sentences.
  20. :: lltlH: lIlill: } when someone speaks of the truth, his/ her words or verbal sentences ought to be congruent to his/ her non-verbal signals.
  21. According to Dr. Albert ulehrabian (a prominent psgchologist who has done extensive studies on the subject of non-verbal W communications), how messages are received and responded to during face -to-face communication shows that when an incongruitg exists between the spoken word and how gou deliver it. the following elements are taken into . vE, .,a, (w. ,,ds, 00n3Td@maTT07T‘ I Vocal (Tonality, inflection) I Non-verltal (Posture, Gesture, Facial Expression)
  22. Research shows that non-verbal signals carrg about five times as much impact as the verbal channel and that when the two are incongruent. A lion-verbal Verbal
  23. Research shows that non-verbal signals carrg about five times as much impact as the verbal channel and that when the two are incongruent. people relg on the non- verbal message. and the verbal content mag be disregarded Non-verbal Verhal
  24. observation 01° gesture clusters and congruence 01° the verbal and non-verbal channels are the kegs TO accurate interpretation of bodg language.
  25. t . ,u -. N I‘ ‘ i l I . l lA ‘ . . l * “A l: ’ v ' . p ‘ e f in addition to looking for gesture clusters » and congruence of speech and bodg movement. all gestures should be considered in the context in which theg occur.
  26. If, for example, someone was sitting at a bus terminal with arms and/ or legs tightlg crossed and chin down and it was a chillg winter's dag, it would most likelg mean that he or she was cold, not defensive.
  27. if. however, a person used the same gestures while gou were sitting across a table from him/ her trging to sell him/ her an idea. product or service, theg could be correctlg interpreted as meaning that the person was negative or defensive about the situation.
  28. the speed of some gestures and how obvious theg look to others is also related to the age of the indii/ ldl/ all.
  29. the speed of some gestures and how obvious theg look to others is also related to the age of the indii/ ldl/ all. For example, if a five- gear—old child tells a lie to his or her parent, the mouth will be deliberatelg covered with one or both hands lmmediatelg afterwards.
  30. when the teenager tells a lie, the hand is brought to the mouth like that of a five- gear—old, but instead of the obvious hand slapping gesture over the mouth, the fingers rub tightlg around it or attempt cover it partiallg.
  31. when the adult tells a lie, her hand covers her mouth in an attempt to block the deceitful words, , but at the last moment the hand is ’ _. pulled awag from the face and a ‘r ‘, .;. -:; '«’. g; 55*‘ . nose touch gesture results. A ‘"; f_ F. < "1’. '{i’/ T . ;“/ _". '. 4 , C‘‘ ‘. _ ’ . ~11 ' fi'T~'r : ‘. “|’_ ,1 I . _ . ,T. _ A _ ) "K 1- / ' k . . . u , r. . ’ O‘. V/ ‘ ; . 5 , . .'A‘, :r’/ /.
  32. when the adult tells a lie, her hand covers her mouth in an attempt to block the deceitful words, but at the last moment the hand is ’ pulled awag from the face and a ‘w ‘ . .-ii".4; 49* . nose touch gesture results. (. 6' 1' ‘ -~ “ ‘ %/ -_ '~ . -. . ~/ . . , - _"' . "‘. ./ this gesture is nothing more than the adults sophisticated / e version of the mouth—covering / re’ ' gesture that was used in 5/’ w 7 childhood ‘ ’/ //i “ . // //7; :
  33. this is an example of the fact that, as an individual gets older, mang of his gestures become sophisticated and less obvious, which is whg it is often more difficult to read the gestures of a fiftg gear-old than those of a much gounger person. ‘ K-"t (‘F ,3 / /f '. Vr ‘’ '1‘ 9| 0' . ‘ . ‘_. ' T -, _ . I l l f’ ll‘, -. p ‘l ll Er W, ‘ ‘J J L ‘ l _ Al - T ‘ "T K- | p I ‘ K T] I ll'Ti. T); ._K. .‘ K‘ ‘T T‘ TT lTT ". T3) TTT I‘ A TN", /3’ 'A H T ' ll p“. * 1 TV! | Tl / ‘.17’ lg T T <‘ 3 T‘; ll 0) r ' A ' if T , . ‘T X T V ‘T ' T i '. «Oi l‘ at I'i_ ‘ll’ T' l Til ' pl '1 Flu . ' ‘K “»b, - . T p T ‘ | ‘ ' I p p -/ _.. ‘J I l T . ‘pl T p p T T = l ' I-T T L’ . . T ‘ K’ 4‘ ‘X ‘l T {K ‘ l 1. I T a’~F ~" ; ' -' 1.» l ' I - » (T at. :'i— ‘. tel ‘ “-3. rd est:
  34. Palm Gestures
  35. V oneness & uoilrsrr one of the most valuable wags of discovering whether someone is being open and honest or not is to look for palm displags.
  36. dust as a dog Will expose its throat to show submission or surrender to the victor, so the human animal uses his or her palms to displag the same attitude or emotion. ' : T‘, /' . ,. V, . .»a>'. ,.. «< “' """- fair‘ . ‘I l. "[~: .‘- . '/"f‘- _J’. r;‘_. , 9;; ‘. ~—'. '. ,7; - */ ’.: ’r, s .4» = .<'_? ,r» «» : / , . / V. _ 5 . ‘R; ‘ 3;»: 11>‘ — ~ ’. - / " x‘ ‘’ ' M‘- _§. ./ - ~. p ‘ ‘K’ "'_-‘S’—' ’. '—"-""" :1/I wry"? —--- “.4 rue“ «V ____ rum __ ‘ _ _: ~ -I ‘_ 1
  37. when someone begins to open up or be truthful, he will expose all or part of his palms to another person.
  38. 9'; Like most bodg language. this is a completelg unconscious gesture. one that gives gou a feeling or hunch that the other person is telling the truth.
  39. when a person is lging or concealing something, his palms are hidden behind his back, in his pockets or in an arm fold position when he tries to explain himself.
  40. it is possible to make gourself appear more credible bg practising open palm gestures when communicating WlTh others;
  41. it is possible to make gourself appear more credible bg practising open palm gestures when communicating WlTh others; converselg, as the open palm gesture; become habitual. the tendencg TO tell untruths lessens.
  42. lnterestinglg, most people find it difficult to lie with their palms exposed and the use of palm signals can in fact help to suppress some of the false I / information others mag give.
  43. lnterestinglg, most people find it difficult to lie with their palms exposed and the use of palm signals can in fact help to suppress some of the false I / information others mag give. e . it also encourages them ‘i “/ ~‘_ / ’ to be open with gou.
  44. 9 PAL nowrn one of the least noticed but most powerful non—verbal signals is given bg the human palm.
  45. 9 PAL nowrn , — - ~ ~. one of the least noticed but most " » A - ‘. powerful non—verbal signals is given bg the human palm. _ _ , / T - T when used correcttg, palm power invests its user with a degree of II authoritg and the l>OWeY OT silent ‘~ . , »’ command over others.
  46. 9 PAL nowrn , — - ~ ~. one of the least noticed but most " ~ - . - ‘. powerful non—verbal signals is given bg the human palm. _ _ , »’ u—— 2’ z T when used correcttg, palm power invests its user with a degree of x r authoritg and the power of silent command over others. x - ~ ~ there are three main palm command gestures:
  47. THE PALM-UP POSITION The palm facing up is used as a submissive, non-threatening gesture, reminiscent of the pleading gesture of a street beggar.
  48. THE PALM-TIP POSITION The palm facing up is used as a submissive, non-threatening gesture, reminiscent of the pleading gesture of a street beggar. THE PALM-DOWN POSITION When the palm is turned to face downwards, it signifies authority and dominance.
  49. THE PALM-UP POSITION The palm facing up is used as a submissive, non-threatening gesture, reminiscent of the pleading gesture oi a street beggar. THE PALM-DOWN POSITION When the palm is turned to face downwards, it signifies authority and dominance. THE PALM-CLOSED-FINGER-POINTED POSITION For this gesture, the palm is closed into a fist and the pointed finger becomes a symbolic club with which the speaker figuratively beats his listener into submission.
  50. The pointed finger is one at the most irritating gestures that a person can use while speaking, par1tcularlg when it beats time to the speaker's words.
  51. the pointed finger is one at the most irritating gestures that a person can use while speaking, particutartg when it beats time to the speaker's words. it gou are an habitual finger-pointer, trg practising the patm—up and patm—down positions and gov will find that gou create a more relaxed attitude and have a more positive effect on other people
  52. Hand 8. Arm Gestures
  53. Rl| BB| NG HANDS Rubbing the hands together is a wag in which people non—verballg communicate positive expectation.
  54. The speed at which a person rubs his palms together signals whom he thinks Will receive the positive results that are expected
  55. sag, for example, gov want to bug a home and gov go to see a real estate agent.
  56. sag, for example, gou want to bug a home and gou go to see a real estate agent. After describing the propertg gou are seeking, the agent rubs her « « palms together guicklg and sags, 2 _; ‘I've got just the right place for gout’
  57. sag, for example, gou want to bug a home and gou go to see a real estate agent. After describing the propertg gou are seeking, the agent rubs her « « palms together guicklg and sags, 2 4: ‘I've got just the right place for gout’ '. ~’) ‘l 5 ’ ‘the agent has ~o . l p pg 53 signalled that her 5 A H, ._ expects the results / ,3 to be to gour benefit. l, -I T I
  58. but how would gou feel if she rubbed her palms together verg slowlg as she told gou that she had the / ' ideal propertg?
  59. but how would gou feel if she rubbed her palms together verg slowlg as she told gou that she had the / ' ideal propertg? , / y / she would then appear to be craflg or devious and would give gou the feeling that the expected results would be to her advantage rather than gours.
  60. sales people are taught that if theg use the palm rub gesture when describing products or services to prospective bugers, theg should be certain to use a fast hand action to avoid putting the buger on the defensive. itllii
  61. when the buger rubs her palms together and sags to the sales person, ‘Lets see what gou have to often’, it is a signal that the buger is expecting to be shown something good and is likelg to make a purchase.
  62. A word of warning: A person who is standing at a bus terminal in freezing winter conditions and who rubs his palms together brisklg mag not necessarilg be doing this because he is expecting a bus. He does it because his hands are cold!
  63. ?L. §§l| ?}I| [5.l? Il: ll| l3e‘% According to master negotiators, Nierenberg and Calero, the hands- clenched position is a frustration gesture (despite the fact that the person mag be smiling). signaling that he/ she was holding back a negative attitude.
  64. the QOSTVYO has 7- main POSlTTOflS= Hands clenched in front or close to the face.
  65. ‘; Hands clenched in front , ’ or close to the face. , s I cl: I /1 7' _ -— ’ I _ _- T ’ ’ - “ ’ i . l , Hands resting on the desk . — _' } or on the lap when seated. Q, I I, ’ X I ~ if-/ /’ “ T A / / ‘WW @2311/Y2 has 7» main POSlTTOflS=
  66. a correlation between the height at which the hands are held and the = ‘ strength of the person's negative mood - that is, the higher the hands are placed, the more difficult it would be to handle. - 1: .54.‘! there also appears to be .5; tr
  67. STEEPLINO HANDS People who are confident, superior tgpes or who use minimal or restricted bodg gestures often use this gesture, and, bg doing so, theg signal their confident attitude.
  68. this fascinating gesture is freopenttg used in superior/ subordinate interaction and that it can be an isolated gesture which indicates (1. confident OF ‘know-it—all’ attitude.
  69. this fascinating gesture is freguenttg used in superior/ subordinate interaction and that it can be an isolated gesture which indicates a confident or ‘know-it—all' attitude. the gesture has 2 versions:
  70. g X Q, » - / / Ti I THE RAISED STEEPIE This position is normally taken when the steeplcr is giving his opinions or ideas and is doing the talking.
  71. THE IIIWERED STEEPIE This gesture is normally used when the steepler is listening rather than speaking. 2.. :5: , 4 — § £2 ; ?:—_'
  72. Although the steeple gesture is a positive signal, it can be used in either positive or negative circumstances, and mag be misinterpreted.
  73. For example, a salesman is presenting his product to a potential buger. I/ ' 7%-1,’ ' . I >. ‘I 7 . “x , . V . :4?
  74. For example, a salesman is presenting his product to a potential buger. towards the end of the sales presentation the customer takes one of the steeple positions.
  75. if the steeple follows a series of positive gestures like open palms, leaning forward, head up, etc. , I . / / I , ..'_: .I / ‘ * I c »~ J I I l , . l I L 3: I‘ I ‘I I‘ / , % I / , / I I ’ 7 ’ . K.‘ ‘I I _ Av / N. p ’
  76. if the steeple follows a series of positive gestures like open palms, leaning forward, head up, etc. , which appears when the salesman shows the buger the solution to his problem,
  77. if the steeple follows a series of positive gestures like open podms, leaning forward, head up, etc. , which appears when the salesman shows the buger the solution to his problem, then he has been given a cue to close the sole, ask for the order and expect to get it.
  78. on the other hand, if the steeple gesture follows a series of negative gestures such as arm folding, leg crossing, looking awag and numerous hand—to—face gestures, ’ ‘x I .1 / / / » ~' . ’)t ' ‘ ' I ‘ ‘ . . I I ‘I / - I f , I y I ’ 1 I l 1 I , ’ y ~ ’. _. / , * / , ’/ I _ Jl { / /
  79. on the other hand, if the steeple gesture follows a series of negative gestures such as arm folding, leg crossing, looking awag and numerous hand—to—face gestures, and if the buger takes the steeple position towards the close of the sales presentation, the buger mag not bug or that mag trg to get rid of the salesman.
  80. in both these cases the steeple gesture means confidence, but one has positive results and the other negative conseopences for the salesman.
  81. In b0Th these cases the steeple gesture means confidence, bVI' one has positive results and the other negative consequences TOY the salesman. -> . ,_ I ‘ A ‘V ‘t ‘ I *2 ,1 -. —'*‘'J , the movements preceding the steeple gesture are 423/ »~pg' the kegs to the outcome.
  82. Q IIRIPPING HANDS, wiiisis & Anus one palm gripping the other hand behind the back is a superioritg/ confidence gesture position.
  83. V IIRIPPINO HANDS, WRISTS & ARMS one palm gripping the other hand behind the back is a superioritg/ confidence gesture position. II’ also allows the person T0 expose hIS vulnerable stomach, heart and throat regions to others in an unconscious act of fearlessness.
  84. lf gou take this position when gou are in a high stress situation, such as being interviewed bg newspaper reporters or simplg waiting outside a dentistts surgerg, gou will feel quite relaxed, confident and even authoritative.
  85. the palm—in-palm gesture should not be confused with the hand—gripping—wrist gesture, which is a signal of frustration and an attempt at self-control
  86. the palm—in-palm gesture should not be confused with the hand—gripping—wrist gesture, which is a signal of frustration and an attempt at self-control in this case, one hand grips the other wrist or arm verg tightlg as if it is an attempt bg one arm to prevent the other from striking out.
  87. lnterestinglg, the further the hand is moved up the back, the more angrg the person has become.
  88. lnterestinglg, the further the hand is moved up the back, the more angrg the person has become. Also, the further the hand is moved up, the greater the attempt 0.1’ self -GDTIITOI
  89. lnterestinglg, the further the hand is moved up the back, the more angrg the person has become. Also, the further the hand is moved up, the greater the attempt 0.1’ self -00l'IITOI it is this tgpe of gesture that has given rise to such expressions as, ‘(act a good grip on gourself’.
  90. C THMB DISPLAYS thumbs most often protrude from people's pockets, sometimes from the back pockets in a secretive manner to trg to hide the person's dominant attitude.
  91. 9 THMB DISPLAYS thumbs most often protrude from people's pockets, sometimes from the back pockets in a secretive manner to trg to hide the person's dominant attitude. Dominant or aggressive women also use this gesture, the women's movement has allowed them to adopt mang male gestures and positions.
  92. Arms folded vwrh thumbs pointing upwourds is another popvlaur fhvmb gesture posifion.
  93. Arms folded with thumbs pointing upwards is another popular thumb gesture position. this is a double signal, being that of a defensive or negative attitude, (folded armsi plus a superior attitude (displaged big the thumbs).
  94. Hand-To-Face Gestures
  95. Recognition of the non-verbal deceit gestures can be one of the most important observation skills one can aoguire.
  96. /'- ‘~V‘~‘ ‘x’ . r_ . l "- ' ', ‘ . " kt , -. ‘-«. , . ‘ . p" ' ~. . ' l 4’ K , '/ ’ / . one of the most commonlg used sgmbols of deceit is that of the three wise monkegs who hear. speak and see no evil
  97. the hand—to—face actions depicted form the basis of . the human deceit gestures.
  98. the hand—to—face actions depicted form the basis of . the human deceit gestures. It - -s . in other words, when we see, speak and hear untruths or ’« deceit, we often attempt to cover our mouth, eges or ears with our hands.
  99. when someone uses a hand—to- face gesture, it does not alwags mean that he or she is lging.
  100. when someone uses a hand—to- face gesture, it does not alwags mean that he or she is lging. it does, however, indicate that the person mag be deceiving gou and further observation of his other gesture clusters can confirm gour suspicions.
  101. when someone uses a hand-to- face gesture, it does not alwags mean that he or she is lging. it does, however, indicate that the person mag be deceiving gou and further observation of his other gesture clusters can confirm gour suspicions. it is important that gou do not interpret hand-to-face gestures in isolation. l
  102. THE MOUTH GUARD ‘the mouth guard is one of the few adult gestures that is as obvious as a child's. the hand covers the mouth and the thumb is pressed against the cheek as the brain sub- consciouslg instructs it to trg and suppress the deceitful words that are being said
  103. sometimes this gesture mag onlg be several fingers over the mouth or ev , i fist, but its meaning 7 ‘ remains the same.
  104. sometimes this gesture mag onlg be several fingers over the mouth or even 4 '9. fist, but its meaning " remains the same. if the person who is speaking uses this gesture, it indicates that he is telling a lie.
  105. if, however, he covers his mouth while gou are speaking, it indicates that he feels gou are lging! Photo: T: voi: !j. ‘1ang'uagepro]ect. com
  106. t illtti’ 'illl: ::| |lItl in essence, the nose touch gesture is a sophisticated, disguised version of the mouth guard gesture. , . I si‘ , ~ Ti‘ / ‘I ‘ A _l
  107. l liii: ;r 'iili: ::iiliii in essence, the nose touch gesture is :77 . .. ,, , a sophisticated, disguised version of t_. 9/ ; .‘, ~ , the mouth guard gesture. T it mag consist of several . . '3‘ 'fi"~‘ light rubs below the nose I / ~ , or it mag be one quick, "T , ' almost imperceptible touch
  108. V " ' T M some women perform . . T A s e~ this gesture with small I. ‘ p T . . discreet strokes to T W ' ‘ , ,s: .+ avoid smudging their ' 7 make—up. L ‘.4 '
  109. x T I" 1‘ . . ' l p ‘l t. 79' - T ” ‘ ‘ ‘A _ V A ' ‘ ' . e . ,,< «K , . V, V I f “~. . 1% Z T one explanation of the origin of the nose touch gesture is that, as the negative thought enters the mind, the subconscious instructs the hand to cover the mouth, but, at the last moment, in an attempt to appear less obvious. the hand pulls awag from the face and or guick nose touch gesture is the result. A
  110. “but what if the person onlg has an itchg nose? ’ is freguenttg asked
  111. ‘but what if the person onlg has an itchg nose? ’ is freguenttg asked the itch in a person's nose is normallg satisfied bg a verg deliberate rubbing or scratching action, as opposed to the light strokes of the nose touch gesture.
  112. Like the mouth guard gesture, it can be used both bg the speaker to disguise his own deceit and bg the listener who doubts the speaker's words.
  113. this gesture is the brain's attempt to block out the deceit. doubt or lie that it sees or to avoid having to look at the face of the person to whom he is telling the lie.
  114. . 4.7‘ ‘ ‘T " .7 / ,3’ V i it '97 J . -i-r l til T . ..r-" '-‘. Men usuallg Yllb their eges / ig0Y0lISiig and if the lie iS 0. big one theg Wiii often i00K awag, normallg TOW0.YdS the ‘T’i00Y.
  115. Photo: bod}‘la. ng'usgep rot ect. c 0 In women use a small, gentte rubbing motion just below the ego, either because theg have been brought up to avoid making robust gestures, or to avoid smudging make—up.
  116. Photo: bod}‘lang'usgeP rot ect. c o in women use a small, gentte rubbing motion just below the ego, either because theg have been brought up to avoid making robust gestures, or to avoid smudging make—up. theg also avoid a listener's gaze bg looking at the ceiling
  117. 9 THEEAR RIJB , '.f ' - Photo: i: vo&_*. 'i. anguageproject. com this is, in effect, an attempt bg the listener to ‘hear no evil’ in trging T0 b|00iL the WOYdS big the hand around OF over the ear.
  118. . . I , . . '_ / I. this is the sophisticated adult version of the hands- over—both—ears gesture used bg the goung child who wants to block out his parents reprimands.
  119. T‘; J it i. I other variations of the ear rub K T ; gesture include rubbing the back of the ear, the finger drill (where ‘ ‘ ‘ ; the fingertip is screwed back and j . t 1‘; forth inside the ear), pulling at the earlobe or bending the entire ear _ -. _ _ , I forward to cover the earhole. g . ’ ii , -_. —
  120. T‘; J it i. I other variations of the ear rub K T ; gesture include rubbing the back of the ear, the finger drill (where ‘ ‘ ‘ ; the fingertip is screwed back and j . ,4 1‘; forth inside the ear), pulling at the earlobe or bending the entire ear _ -. _ _ , « forward to cover the earhole. this last gesture is a signal - — ' 5 that the person has heard p enough or mag want to speak. T
  121. V "I ' "'l| V' Ull "'nll T IT TIJII 'l| liT: n ‘II in ThiS case, the index finger of the writing .1“ hand scratches below the earlobe, or mag even scratch the side of the neck
  122. observations of this gesture reveals an interesting point: the person usuallg scratches about 5 times Rarelg is the number of scratches less than 5 and seldom more than 5.
  123. ThiS gesture iS a signal OT dOVbT OY uncertaintg and TS characteristic OT’ the person WhO sags, ‘I'M not sure i agree. ’ I. ’ ‘ x‘ ,3 I, ‘ "TS . i i . ,3}: i . .‘. .i - ‘ 1; ‘ . « p x .7 7' 1» ‘H , /J“ x
  124. i ‘i’ : :ii. .: ii "ll, ’ Research into the gestures of those who tell lies revealed that the e, , telling of a lie caused a ~ tingling sensation in the delicate facial and neck tissues and a rub or scratch was reguired to p ‘ satisfg it. _ at ‘i . . . 'I-‘. ‘;. ’i. 'rta7, Ii‘; . , mite 9.2.-jvfizsgszvag-1‘9;gf-jptglgg-in-i--J I,
  125. this seems to be a reasonable explanation of whg some people use the collar pull gesture when theg tell a lie and suspect that theg have been caught out.
  126. it is almost as if the lie causes a slight trickle of sweat to form on the neck when the deceiver feels that gou suspect he iS lging.
  127. when igOU see someone use ThiS gesture, guestions like - Ti‘ that, please? would ou re eat (l ‘t P
  128. l that point, please? !/pi that, please? when igOU see someone use ThiS gesture, questions like - >"“. W », , , ./‘ ‘s — I ‘,1 / r' gou clarifg it . F-. . , . ,__>V ‘ . > . .. .. gm . _ V X’ l - «' ”“— ’”‘v)J a would gou repeatgi
  129. when igOU see someone use ThiS gesture, questions like - / ' *‘‘“~~«. _ _ , ‘wAr _: Q R. as by _ ‘». x liiou clariilfl would iflou rePeaTi that point, please? !/pi that, please? i. ,/ f ti _ 4», ./ - ' ‘, i_ _, ,~—>"" V - 2.‘ T g . J /2 “M/ ."7"%k_' _ _, _.»vv” _k_ ‘-aw can cause the would-be deceiver to give the game awag.
  130. this gesture is also used when a person is feeling angrg or frustrated and needs to pull the collar awag from his neck in an attempt to let the cool air circulate around it. I
  131. T iiitilii iiiiiiiiiiiiii‘. ii'§: l| 3i. ,:l""| i|ii An exaggerated version of the collar pull gesture is the palm rubbing the back of the neck in what is called the 'pain—in—the—neck' gesture.
  132. T iiitilii iiiiiiiiiiiiii‘. ii'§: l| 3i. ,:l""| i|ii An exaggerated version of the collar pull gesture is the palm rubbing the back of the neck in what is called the 'pain—in—the—neck' gesture. A person who uses this when lging usuallg avoids gour gate and looks down.
  133. this gesture is also used as a signal of frustration or anger and, when this is _. the case, the hand slaps “ “ the back of the neck first and then begins to rub the neck.
  134. Let us assume, for example. that gou asked a subordinate to complete a certain task for gou and that the subordinate had forgotten to do it within the time required
  135. Let us assume, for example. that gou asked a subordinate to complete a certain task for gou and that the subordinate had forgotten 1'0 do if Vi/ lfriirl the time reguired. when gou ask him for the results, he non-verballg M signals his forgetfulness bg “ t *1 ' "' slapping his head, either on the forehead or the back of *‘ the neck, as if he were sgmbolicallg hitting himself. A i I
  136. Although slapping of the head communicates forgetfulness, the person signals how he feels / . about gou or the situation bg the I position used when he stops his ‘ ‘ ~> hand on his head, either ' . « the forehead or the neck.
  137. ’ ‘N If he slaps his forehead he V 1‘ . ~ signals that he is not ' intimidated bg gour having mentioned his forgetfulness, OI
  138. if he slaps his forehead he 5 signals that he is not Y intimidated bg gour having mentioned his forgetfulness, ;. but when he slaps the back is T; of his neck, he non-verballg . tells gou that gou are literallg ‘ a ‘pain-in-the-neck’ for pointing out his error.
  139. those WhO habituallg rub the backs OT’ their necks have a. tendencg T0 be negative or critical,
  140. 7 .5. those who habituallg rub the * i 7'“ ‘pl backs of their necks have a i , i-. tendencg to be negative or ~ critical, . J ‘R a‘ ~’", i ‘.1 l T iipktsfl. ‘ . ..'/ ’ gk 7 ‘ 1 J / ‘_j li'vi: i:§' 4; T ; l:"‘v""'/ ,5 whereas those who is g < habituallg rub their it foreheads to non—verbaliee 1 , an error tend to be more . ‘plglzz open, easg—going people.
  141. t R-'lli. ~ii£: :: i "ll i'iliii": when a person is under pressure, the fingers are placed in the mouth .
  142. whereas most hand—to-mouth gestures involve lging or deception, the fingers-in-mouth gesture is an outward manifestation of an inner need for reassurance.
  143. whereas most hand—to-mouth gestures involve lging or deception, the fingers-in-mouth gesture is an outward manifestation of an inner need for reassurance. r‘ 4 ~’. 32 A 1 pi-. _ -. ._. .>, ‘ - -I 3 i— ~v(_}-4 . ~»I- L_- ‘. -_'- . ,. '. -(Hf . l. . ‘mi-Hg . '-5}. &.! .;'/ -. _~ ciiving the person guarantees and assurances is appropriate when this gesture appears.
  144. Arm Barriers
  145. V FlllEll ARMS Hiding behind a barrier iS a normal human response that we learn at an earlg age TO protect ourselves.
  146. tag folding one or both arms across the chest, a barrier is formed that is, in essence, at attempt to block out the impending threat or undesirable circumstances.
  147. tag folding one or both arms across the chest, a barrier is formed that is, in essence, at attempt to block out the impending threat or undesirable circumstances. ‘ ‘ one thing is certain: A _/ when a person has a nervous, A A ,3 negative or defensive attitude, _/ i re’ g he will fold his arms firmlg on -r . .<: his chest, a strong signal that he feels threatened
  148. v STADARO ARM-CROSS the standard arm-cross gesture is a universal gesture signifging the same defensive or negative attitude almost evergwhere.
  149. __ . _‘ , . ' 2 . If i / i ii. ‘:1 r. _» ‘. ‘ _-‘I r ' i. ‘ v , ‘ . . / , /T - J _ , i . , = / i . . l ‘ / ' 4’, /if f" . i‘ A / ,"T/ ,' . . - ~ = I 5 I I i "ii. .. ' “ is ""i‘ . ‘ ii i I _4. / " hi "'s ' ‘A ' ‘ 564‘ ‘.2 . ..z_ k. i-3_; ;_f_, '~ / if _—_Ag}u_¥;5_, .;¢: i “ i 43"’: .-_'. g' V T :9 / ' i #'; _*. .-j: A‘ IT IS commonlg seen when a person iS among strangers in public meetings, gueues, cafeterias, elevators or angwhere that people ‘i’ eel uncertain or insecure.
  150. when gou see the , arm-cross gesture _, occur during a face- / . to—face encounter,
  151. I when gou see the 5- arm-cross gesture I ‘ occur during a face- to-face encounter, / it is reasonable to assume that gou mag have said something with which the other person disagrees, I ' { ji"
  152. when gou see the - : arm-cross gesture ‘ r I ‘ occur during a face- to-face encounter, / it is reasonable to assume that . / gou mag have said something i‘. ‘ with which the other person I disagrees, ‘ I ' pl / i‘ so it mag be pointtess continuing gour line of argument even though the other person mag be verballg agreeing with gou.
  153. the fact is that the non-verbal medium does not lie; the verbal medium does. N0, I'm not angrg at all. Dont worrg.
  154. the fact is that the non-verbal medium does not lie 5 the _ ’“‘*; «:. ... ,pi. .. verbal medium does. No, I'm not g angrg at all. ”) Dont worrg. .0 —_. r i‘) it‘ _ ii: -V (‘J i i. wig. pp _7 I iii . / . x""f""”‘*-—-——= -—-“? *~*"”"’. ., ii‘ xi ~' 3" / .' . I -. .,/ "( I it 4. ' 2’ i " ‘I ‘ ' Your objective at this point «"a. - , i should be to trg to discover --— the cause of the arms- p x. ._ folded gesture and to move the person into a more / I r i . rece tive osition. / JG 5”’ t P P
  155. Remember: As long as the arms-folded gesture remains, the negative attitude will remain. the attitude causes the gestures to occur and prolonging the gesture forces the attitude to remain. Q
  156. A simple but effective method of breaking the folded-arms position is to hand the person a pen, a book or something that forces him to unfold his arms to reach forward
  157. A simple but effective method of breaking the folded-arms position is to hand the person a pen, a book or something that forces him to unfold his arms to reach forward this moves him into a more open posture and attitude.
  158. Asking the person to lean forward to look at a visual presentation can also be an effective " means of opening the folded-arms position. a; "'1 . ,f - —. . F - i T i - ‘ / ’ , {‘, ' p p . *-~. ‘“‘» W T f « ‘ ‘W 5 . _ y T’ v. . ’ - Mr "’""" 'h_: _ , -a- H“ 7 _ - -X ‘ " x - . - ' i . ,
  159. iiiiiitoieroiiiiiii-iss i i I i I ' - i . ' ~ i, i . ~ ' - - . _ i . ,, ,, . . I """" . . , hp . . . , ‘ ‘I i i I l I ‘ M i _, r" / / / A. if, as well as the full arm-cross gesture the person has clenched fists, it indicates a hostile and defensive attitude.
  160. ’IhiS cluster IS often combined with clenched teeth and red face, in which case a verbal or phgsical attack mag be imminent.
  161. this cluster is - often combined ‘* with clenched teeth and red face, in which / “N ‘ case averbal or sical attack be imminent. the person using ThiS gesture cluster has an attacking attitude.
  162. I I) III | "' I Hill’: -i ill I'i 1‘iiiii"'-ll-'-l iiiillll . II' the full arm-cross gesture is sometimes too obvious to use around others because it tells them that we are fearful
  163. 9 i>iiiitiiii Aiiii-eiiiiss BARRIERS the full arm-cross gesture is sometimes too obvious to use around others because iT tells them that We are fearful occasionallg we substitute a subtter version - the partial arm cross. in which one arm svnngs across the bodg to hold or touch the other arm to form the barrier.
  164. the partial arm barrier is often seen at meetings where a person mag be a stranger to the group or is lacking in self-confidence. (?
  165. Another popular version of a partial arm barrier is holding hands with oneself, a gesture commonlg used bg people who stand before a crowd to receive an award or give a speech.
  166. Renowned ethologist and author, Desmond i/ lorris, said that this gesture allows a person to relive the emotional securitg that he experienced as a child when his parent held his hand under fearful circumstances. r’ ’_T’ i it’ i
  167. IIISGIIISEII ARM-CROSS ‘H E Disguised arm-cross t gestures are highlig sophisticated gestures used bg people who are continuatlg exposed to others. Photo: i3od: :Iangusgepxo]ect, coxn
  168. I I ”‘i"r~ i 1* i this group includes politicians, sales people, television personalities and the like who do not want their audience to detect that theg are unsure of themselves or nervous.
  169. Like out arm-cross gestures, one arm swings across in front of the bodg to grasp the other arm but instead of the arms folding, one hand touches a handbag, bracelet, watch, shirt cuff or other object on or near the other arm.
  170. Like all arm-cross gestures, one arm swings across in front of the bodg to grasp the other arm but instead of the arms folding, one hand touches a handbag, bracelet, watch, shirt cuff or other object on or near the other arm. once again the barrier is formed and the secure feeling is achieved.
  171. women are less obvious than men in their use of disguised arm barrier gestures because theg can grasp such things as handbags or purses when theg become unsure of themselves. . . ,4
  172. one of the most . common versions of it this is holding a ' ' glass of beer or up wine with two hands.
  173. one of the most common versions of this is holding a glass of beer or vvlne with two hands. The use of two hands allows the nervous person to form an almost undetectable arm barrier.
  174. Leg Barriers
  175. V Like arm barrier gestures, crossed ’ __ legs are a signal that a negative ‘ or defensive attitude mag exist —*~. .,/ ‘‘ : ii. w
  176. the purpose of crossing _. L . the arms on the chest was originallg to defend the heart and upper bodg region and crossing the legs is an attempt to shield the genital area.
  177. 1 l r l ', J/ f_"_, ~ , ‘ / . ti ll . - ‘ ' . ’ , ‘ix * . F’ I 5, " fir —' I, 5 I ‘-. . >/ : I; // 1;’ ‘ Z , I ’ / ' ~ — / _'i , , i . / A’ l i _ ' . _ __~_, _, I ll' - , care Sh0Vld be taken when interpreting crossed leg gestures with women as mang have been taught Th0L1’ this is how To ‘sit like 0L ladgt
  178. unfortunatelg for them, ‘ all i however, the gesture can l make them seem defensive. 2 Mi" 4 l;
  179. V 1- — ‘- 0 STANDARD LEG CRITSS 1 6 one leg is crossed neattg over the other, usuallg the right over the left, and mag be used to show a nervous, reserved or defensive attitude.
  180. However, this is usuallg a supportive gesture that occurs with other negative gestures and should not be interpreted in isolation or out of context
  181. when the crossed legs gesture is combined with crossed arms, the person has withdrawn from the conversation.
  182. This pose is popular among women in most countries, particularlg to show their displeasure with a husband or bogfriend
  183. 9 THEFIDDRE 4 LED LUCK this leg cross indicates that an argumentative or competitive attitude exists and is the sitting position used bg mang males who have 0. competitive nature.
  184. 9 THEFIGURE 4 LED CLAMP the person who has a hard and fast attitude in an argument or debate will often lock the figure 4 into place with one or both hands, using them as a clamp.
  185. 9 THEFIGURE 4 LED CLAMP the person who has a hard and fast attitude in an argument or debate will often lock the figure 4 into place with one or both hands, using them as a clamp. This is a sign of the tough—minded, stubborn individual who mag need a special approach to break through his resistance.
  186. 9 STADING LEG CRDSS the next time gou attend a meeting or function, gou will notice small groups of people all standing with their arms and legs crossed
  187. 9 STADING LEG CRDSS The next time lg0U attend (L meeting or function, gou will (-3 notice small groups of people (:1, all standing with their arms '--x' ~' and legs crossed E? 5 observation will also reveal that theg are standing at a greater distance from each other than the customarg one, and that, if theg are wearing coats or jackets, theg are usuallg 4‘ buttoned. 4 ‘ 4""
  188. if gou were to question these people, gou would find that one or all of them are strangers to the others in the group. This is how must people stand when theg are among people whom theg do not know well
  189. LET’s RECAP 0 - SomeBasics - neriernouhuying - Eesluresclusters - iiieiiiouiiiiiuani Arramewmk - Continence . NgseIouching . - lieslureslncontext _ Myer“ Forflnilerstanding . Age - IheEarRuli , -- . The iiecisctaicii 9- — —_ _ " , - The [Iol| arPu| | X! ’ _ - HeadRuliliing8.Head Ha"d'T°'Face tn‘ Ems slawng Gestures - ReinlorcedArm- - fingerslnilietloutli ‘i, cross I‘ " ,5 6 - Partiallrm-Cross - Rubbing Hands 9 _ _] - Barriers - clenched Hands Am‘ B‘""°'S - DisguiseilIlrm- - étoeplingflflaitilds Ham] 3, Arm Cross - ripping an s, _ Wrists 8. Arms Gestures : -6 ° Thumb Displays " ' ‘ ' — 4 leg Barriers - crossed legs opmmaflomy - Standaritlegliross o Pa| m Powgr . The Figure 4 leg luck - The figureueglllamp - Standiiiglegcriiss
  190. LEARN MORE ON RELATED TOPIC? CLICK ON ANY OF THE BELOW TO OPEN THE LINK. (NOTE: THE LINKS DON'T SEEM TO WORK ON MOBILE DEvI<: Es) BODY LANGUAGE ? APPLYING BODY LANGUAGE IN JOB INTERVIEWS BODY LANGUAGE
  191. ideas adapted from BODY LNl(siUA(si8 How to Read others’ Thoughts bg Their eiestures eg Allan Pease

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