Health 2.0:
RSS, alerts, medical SEs & Google features

Anwarul Islam, PhD
anwarpulak@gmail.com
1
http://electronicportfolios.com/web2/class/web-2.0-concept.jpg
2
Web 2.0 in Health Care
Purpose

Case example in
academic literature

Users

All (medical professionals
and public)

Stayin...
Web 2.0 in Health Care
Purpose

Case example in
academic literature

Users

Managing a particular
disease

Shown that pati...
e-Patient
• An e-patient (also known as Internet
patient, or Internet-savvy patient) is a
health consumer who uses the Int...
e-Patients
e-Patients are increasingly active in their care•

Equipped with the skills to manage their own condition.

•

...
Health 2.0 Model

7
Health 2.0
Health 2.0= web
2.0 + healthcare
(focusing on
shaping
healthcare with
web 2.0 tools and
concepts)
PHR: Personal...
Health 2.0
Health 2.0 (as well as the closely related concept
of Medicine 2.0 are terms representing the
possibilities bet...
Medicine 2.0
Medicine 2.0 is the use of a specific set of
Web tools (blogs, Podcasts, tagging,
search, wikis, etc) by acto...
Medicine 2.0

Medicine 2.0=
web 2.0 +
medicine
(focusing on
doctor-patient
communicatio
n and
technologies)

11
12
13
Telemedicine
• African villagers used smoke signals to
warn people to stay away from the village
in case of serious diseas...
Telemedicine ……
•

Since1960s, when astronauts first went into space. In fact, NASA
built telemedicine technology into ear...
Telemedicine …
•

1971: The U.S. National Library of Medicine's Lister Hill National
Center for Biomedical Communication c...
Telemedicine ….
•

1977: Canada's Memorial University of Newfoundland participated
in a Canadian Space Program for distanc...
Specialist care delivery by TM
•

Telecardiology

•

Telepsychiatry

•

Teleradiology

•

Telepathology

•

Teledermatolog...
Medical Search Engines
OmniMedicalSearch.com. Gathering information from many of the top
medical professional sites such a...
Medical Search Engines
Intute. Out of the U.K., this site offers searches on a wide variety
of topics under medicine, nurs...
Medical Search Engines
PubMed. Sponsored by the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the
National Institutes of Health, t...
Medical Search Engines
MedBioWorld. Geared toward medical professionals and those in the
biotechnology field, this search ...
Medical Search Engines
Electronic Orange Book. Updated daily, this online resource
monitors generic prescription drugs and...
Medical Search Engines
MedicalStudent.com. Ignore the name, this site isn’t just for medical
students. This free and incre...
Google Search
Tips
Phrase search ("")
By putting double quotes around a set of words, you are telling Google
to consider t...
Google Search
Tips
•
•

Fill in the blanks (*)

•
•

Search exactly as is (+)

The *, or wildcard, is a little-known featu...
Google Search
Tips
•

Terms you want to exclude (-)

•

Attaching a minus sign immediately before a word indicates that yo...
Google Search
Tips
Exceptions
• Search is rarely absolute. Search engines use a variety of techniques to imitate
how peopl...
Google search features

29
30
http://scholar.google.com/

31
https://docs.google.com

32
http://translate.google.com/?tab=#
33
RSS
•

RSS = Really Simple Syndication is a family of web feed formats used to publish
frequently updated works—such as en...
RSS History & Variants
The RSS formats were preceded by several attempts at web
syndication that did not achieve widesprea...
What Kind of Information Can be Delivered in
RSS Feeds?
Ego / News Monitoring
Companies or individuals interested in recei...
What Kind of Information Can be Delivered in
RSS Feeds?
Blogs Feed
Many blogs are catalogued in an RSS feed, with each blo...
What are the benefits to having an RSS feed?
RSS is beneficial to both publishers and website visitors. To
keep things sim...
How 2 subscribe RSS
Find the RSS icon or button and subscribe.
• Websites and blogs that have feeds want you to
subscribe....
RSS symbols

40
http://rss-tutorial.com/rss-how-to-subscribe-to-feeds.htm
How 2 subscribe RSS

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q3pzmIausQ

41
42
Medicine Net.com

http://www.medicinenet.com/rss/article.htm

43
Medicine Net.com

http://www.medicinenet.com/rss/article.htm

44
Medical news today feeds

45
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/index.php?page=newsfeed
rss4medics.com

http://www.rss4medics.com/directory.html46
rss4medics.com
Cancer & Oncology RSS Feeds

http://www.rss4medics.com/rss_directory/cancer_feeds.html

47
http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rss/rss

48
49
50
http://www.google.com/alerts

51
52
53
THANKS
54
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Health2.o: RSS, Alerts, MeSEs and Google Features

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  • Health2.o: RSS, Alerts, MeSEs and Google Features

    1. 1. Health 2.0: RSS, alerts, medical SEs & Google features Anwarul Islam, PhD anwarpulak@gmail.com 1
    2. 2. http://electronicportfolios.com/web2/class/web-2.0-concept.jpg 2
    3. 3. Web 2.0 in Health Care Purpose Case example in academic literature Users All (medical professionals and public) Staying informed RSS, Podcasts and search tools Medical education How podcasts can be used on the move to increase total All (medical professionals available educational time or the many applications of these and public) tools to public health Collaboration and practice Google searches revealed the correct diagnosis in 15 out of 26 cases (58%, 95% Doctors, Nurses confidence interval 38% to 77%) in a 2005 study[19] 3
    4. 4. Web 2.0 in Health Care Purpose Case example in academic literature Users Managing a particular disease Shown that patients have different patterns of usage depending on if they are newly diagnosed or managing a severe long-term illness. Long-term patients are more likely to connect to a community in Health 2.0 Sharing data for research Disease specific communities for patients with rare conditions aggregate data on treatments, symptoms, and outcomes to All (medical professionals improve their decision making and public) ability and carry out scientific research such as observational trials Public 4
    5. 5. e-Patient • An e-patient (also known as Internet patient, or Internet-savvy patient) is a health consumer who uses the Internet to gather information about a medical condition of particular interest to them, and who use electronic communication tools (including Web 2.0 tools) in coping with medical conditions. 5
    6. 6. e-Patients e-Patients are increasingly active in their care• Equipped with the skills to manage their own condition. • Enabled to make choices about self-care and those choices are respected. • Empowered • Engaged patients are engaged in their own care • Equals in their partnerships with the various physicians involved in their care • Emancipated • Expert patients can improve their self-rated health status, cope better with fatigue and other generic features of chronic disease such as role limitation, and reduce disability and their dependence on hospital care. 6
    7. 7. Health 2.0 Model 7
    8. 8. Health 2.0 Health 2.0= web 2.0 + healthcare (focusing on shaping healthcare with web 2.0 tools and concepts) PHR: Personal Health Record CHR: Clinical Health Record HER: Electronic Health Record NHR: National Health Record 8
    9. 9. Health 2.0 Health 2.0 (as well as the closely related concept of Medicine 2.0 are terms representing the possibilities between health care, e-Health and Web 2.0, and has come into use after a recent spate of articles in newspapers, and by Physicians and Medical Librarians. Health 2.0 defines the combination of health data and health information with (patient) experience through the use of ICT, enabling the citizen to become an active and responsible partner in his/her own health and care pathway. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medicine_2.0 9
    10. 10. Medicine 2.0 Medicine 2.0 is the use of a specific set of Web tools (blogs, Podcasts, tagging, search, wikis, etc) by actors in health care including doctors, patients, and scientists, using principles of open source and generation of content by users, and the power of networks in order to personalize health care, collaborate, and promote health education. http://healthinformaticist.wordpress.com/200 8/08/08/medicine-20-definition/ 10
    11. 11. Medicine 2.0 Medicine 2.0= web 2.0 + medicine (focusing on doctor-patient communicatio n and technologies) 11
    12. 12. 12
    13. 13. 13
    14. 14. Telemedicine • African villagers used smoke signals to warn people to stay away from the village in case of serious disease. • In the early 1900s, people living in remote areas of Australia used two-way radios, powered by a dynamo driven by a set of bicycle pedals, to communicate with the Royal Flying Doctor Service of Australia. 14
    15. 15. Telemedicine …… • Since1960s, when astronauts first went into space. In fact, NASA built telemedicine technology into early spacecraft and spacesuits to monitor astronauts' physiological parameters. • 1964: Under a grant from the U.S. National Institute for Mental Health (NMH), the Nebraska Psychiatric Institute began using a twoway closed-circuit TV link between the Institute itself and Norfolk State Hospital about 112 miles away. • 1967: A medical station was established at Boston's Logan International Airport and linked to Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), miles away within the city of Boston. 24 hrs, using a two-way microwave audio/video link. 15
    16. 16. Telemedicine … • 1971: The U.S. National Library of Medicine's Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communication chose 26 sites in Alaska to verify the reliability of telemedicine via satellite communications. NASA's ATS-1 satellite was used for this experiment. • 1972: NASA began trial runs of its Space Technology Applied to Rural Papago Advanced Health Care (STARPAHC) program for telemedical help for people living in remote locations with little or no medical services.The program lasted until 1975. • 1972: The Health Care Technology Division of the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare (HEW) funded seven telemedicine research and demonstration projects. • The next year, the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) funded two more telemedicine projects: the Boston Nursing Home project for geriatric patients, and the Miami-Dade project between Florida's Dade County and Miami's Jackson Memorial Hospital. 16
    17. 17. Telemedicine …. • 1977: Canada's Memorial University of Newfoundland participated in a Canadian Space Program for distance education and medical care, using the joint Canadian/U.S. Hermes satellite. • 1984: The North-West Telemedicine project was set up in Australia to pilot test the Australia government's Q-Network satellite communications network. The project's goal was to provide health care to people in five remote towns south of the Gulf of Carpentaria. • 1989: After a massive earthquake hit the Soviet Republic of Armenia, the U.S. offered the Soviet Union, under the auspices of the U.S./U.S.S.R. Joint Working Group on Space Biology, use of a one-way international telemedicine network for consultations between Yerevan, Armenia, and four medical centers in the U.S. The Space Bridge program was later extended to Ufa, Russia. 17
    18. 18. Specialist care delivery by TM • Telecardiology • Telepsychiatry • Teleradiology • Telepathology • Teledermatology • Teledentistry • Tele-audiology • Telesurgery • Enabling technologies • Videotelephony • Health information technology Source : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Telemedicine 18
    19. 19. Medical Search Engines OmniMedicalSearch.com. Gathering information from many of the top medical professional sites such as PubMed, NIH, and Merck, this search engine provides information from peer level sources. Partnered with Healthline.com and Google Custom Search, the results offered are from a full search engine. They also offer a "reference desk of hard-to-find medical resources.“ URL: http://www.omnimedicalsearch.com/ Welch Medical Library. While this site is specifically for those associated with Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, it offers a search feature for articles published in medical journals and online. Many of the full articles are available for a fee, while others are free of charge. In addition to the powerful search engine, they also have Subject Guides under the "eResources" section that offers links to topics ranging from Alternative Medicine to Grants and Funding to Writing and Publishing. URL: http://www.welch.jhu.edu/index.cfm ClinicalTrials.gov. Search this world wide registry of "federally and privately supported clinical trials." Search almost 57,000 trials by condition, drug intervention, sponsor, or location. There is also a link for professionals who want to register their trials with this site. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ 19
    20. 20. Medical Search Engines Intute. Out of the U.K., this site offers searches on a wide variety of topics under medicine, nursing/midwifery, medical history, and other fields in the health sciences. They also provide links to a handful of resource brochures and training site tutorials. URL: http://www.intute.ac.uk/medicine/ Healthline. Search for diagnoses and treatments while staying on top of health and wellness with this medical site. Healthline searches the best of the health sites available on the Internet, reducing your search time. Browse by topic or use their keyword search. Also visit the top 10 diagnostic tests or browse their dictionaries. URL: http://www.healthline.com/ HighWire Press. This database provides access to most of the major news and research publications in the life sciences. Almost half of the full-text articles available are free of charge. URL: http://highwire.stanford.edu/ 20
    21. 21. Medical Search Engines PubMed. Sponsored by the U.S. National Library of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health, this database provides access to citations going back for the past 40 years. You must register (free) with NCBI before having access to this powerful search engine. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/ Entrez. Hosted by NCBI, this life sciences search engine allows for searches in PubMed, Human Genome, GenBank, Mapviewer, and BLAST. Additionally, you can search across all the available databases which gather information from journal articles, books, online books, and more. URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sites/gquery eMedicine. A part of WebMD, this site is geared to the medical professional. Describing itself as an "open access comprehensive medical textbook," eMedicine offers over 6,500 clinical articles written by contributing physicians. eMedicine also offers free accredited CME courses for physicians. URL: http://emedicine.medscape.com/ 21
    22. 22. Medical Search Engines MedBioWorld. Geared toward medical professionals and those in the biotechnology field, this search engine finds information from journals, organizations, and databases. Use their tools, directories, dictionaries, and read the blog for even more information. They also offer a search within Reuter’s Health and Medical News. URL: http://www.medbioworld.com/ HONMedhunt. Not only can you search for specific topics on any imaginable health topic, but once your results pop up in the window, you can click on different tabs to find conference information, news, and images that relate to your query without re-typing the keyword. Since this site is sponsored by the UN, you may receive results in French, Spanish, or Chinese as well as English. URL: http://www.hon.ch/HONsearch/Patients/medhunt.html Antibiotic Guide. Browse this guide by specific antibiotics, diagnosis, pathogens, management, and vaccines. Look for free, updated CME programs that are also available. URL: http://www.hopkinsguides.com/hopkins/ub 22
    23. 23. Medical Search Engines Electronic Orange Book. Updated daily, this online resource monitors generic prescription drugs and posts updates with new generic drug approvals, application approvals, discontinuations, patents, and exclusivity information. Use one of five different search types to find the medicine you want to learn about. URL: http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/ob/default.cfm American Hospital Directory. Working in any field in the health profession, having access to information for hospitals is always handy. Keep this search nearby for the next time you need to contact a hospital anywhere in America. Search for hospitals by area code, zip code, or by city and state. URL: http://www.ahd.com/freesearch.php PubGene. Specifically geared to searches for genes and proteins, this search engine relies on text mining PubMed articles to find any source with a specific gene or protein mentioned in it. For any researcher or physician working in genetics, this search engine will keep up with all that is happening in the field for you. Search by organism, gene/protein, or biological term. URL: http://www.pubgene.org/ 23
    24. 24. Medical Search Engines MedicalStudent.com. Ignore the name, this site isn’t just for medical students. This free and incredibly comprehensive site provides links to online medical textbooks, medical journals, continuing education/board exam information, and more. Check out their page of awards, reviews, and comments. URL: http://www.medicalstudent.com/ Journal Watch. Monitoring 350 medical journals, this site offers both journal searches as well as short, daily email updates. Choose between Primary Care Physician, Cardiology, Gastroenterology, and other specialties to specialize the content according to the type of medicine you practice. For other healthcare professionals, they also offer subscriptions for nonphysicians as well. URL: http://www.jwatch.org/ MDLinx.com. This site reviews over 1200 journals and provides a search by specialties and subspecialties. In addition, they offer conference and job listings. You must register, but it is free of charge. Medical professionals and laypersons alike may sign up for newsletters within their specialty. URL: http://www.mdlinx.com/ Medscape. For both professionals and non-professionals, Medscape offers searches in a number of databases. They also offer specialized sections for non-physician professionals such as pharmacists, med students, and nurses, as well as a specialty section with information that is specialtyspecific. Registration is required, but is free of charge. 24 URL: http://www.medscape.com/
    25. 25. Google Search Tips Phrase search ("") By putting double quotes around a set of words, you are telling Google to consider the exact words in that exact order without any change. For example, a search for [ "Alexander Bell" ] (with quotes) will miss the pages that refer to Alexander G. Bell. Search within a specific website (site:) Google allows you to specify that your search results must come from a given website. For example, the query [ iraq site:nytimes.com ] will return pages about Iraq but only from nytimes.com. The simpler queries [ iraq nytimes.com ] or [ iraq New York Times ] will usually be just as good, though they might return results from other sites that mention the New York Times. You can also specify a whole class of sites, for example [ iraq site:.gov ] will return results only from a .gov domain and [ iraq site:.iq ] will return results only from Iraqi sites. http://www.google.com/support/websearch/bin/static.py? hl=en&page=guide.cs&guide=1221265&answer=136861&rd=1 25
    26. 26. Google Search Tips • • Fill in the blanks (*) • • Search exactly as is (+) The *, or wildcard, is a little-known feature that can be very powerful. If you include * within a query, it tells Google to try to treat the star as a placeholder for any unknown term(s) and then find the best matches. For example, the search [ Google * ] will give you results about many of Google's products (go to next page and next page -- we have many products). The query [ Obama voted * on the * bill ] will give you stories about different votes on different bills. Note that the * operator works only on whole words, not parts of words. Google employs synonyms automatically, so that it finds pages that mention, for example, childcare for the query [ child care ] (with a space), or California history for the query [ ca history ]. But sometimes Google helps out a little too much and gives you a synonym when you don't really want it. By attaching a + immediately before a word (remember, don't add a space after the +), you are telling Google to match that word precisely as you typed it. Putting double quotes around a single word will do the same thing. http://www.google.com/support/websearch/bin/static.py?hl=en&page=guide.cs&guide=1221265&answer=136861&rd=1 26
    27. 27. Google Search Tips • Terms you want to exclude (-) • Attaching a minus sign immediately before a word indicates that you do not want pages that contain this word to appear in your results. The minus sign should appear immediately before the word and should be preceded with a space. For example, in the query [ anti-virus software ], the minus sign is used as a hyphen and will not be interpreted as an exclusion symbol; whereas the query [ anti-virus -software ] will search for the words 'anti-virus' but exclude references to software. You can exclude as many words as you want by using the - sign in front of all of them, for example [ jaguar -cars -football -os ]. The - sign can be used to exclude more than just words. For example, place a hyphen before the 'site:' operator (without a space) to exclude a specific site from your search results. • • The OR operator Google's default behavior is to consider all the words in a search. If you want to specifically allow either one of several words, you can use the OR operator (note that you have to type 'OR' in ALL CAPS). For example, [ San Francisco Giants 2004 OR 2005 ] will give you results about either one of these years, whereas [ San Francisco Giants 2004 2005 ] (without the OR) will show pages that include both years on the same page. The symbol | can be substituted for OR. (The AND operator, by the way, is the default, so it is not needed.) http://www.google.com/support/websearch/bin/static.py?hl=en&page=guide.cs&guide=1221265&answer=136861&rd=1 27
    28. 28. Google Search Tips Exceptions • Search is rarely absolute. Search engines use a variety of techniques to imitate how people think and to approximate their behavior. As a result, most rules have exceptions. For example, the query [ for better or for worse ] will not be interpreted by Google as an OR query, but as a phrase that matches a (very popular) comic strip. Google will show calculator results for the query [ 34 * 87 ] rather than use the 'Fill in the blanks' operator. Both cases follow the obvious intent of the query. Here is a list of exceptions to some of the rules and guidelines that were mentioned in this and the Basic Search Help article: Exceptions to 'Every word matters' • Words that are commonly used, like 'the,' 'a,' and 'for,' are usually ignored (these are called stop words). But there are even exceptions to this exception. The search [ the who ] likely refers to the band; the query [ who ] probably refers to the World Health Organization -- Google will not ignore the word 'the' in the first query. • Synonyms might replace some words in your original query. (Adding + before a word disables synonyms.) • A particular word might not appear on a page in your results if there is sufficient other evidence that the page is relevant. The evidence might come from language analysis that Google has done or many other sources. For example, the query [ overhead view of the bellagio pool ] will give you nice overhead pictures from pages that do not include the word 'overhead.' http://www.google.com/support/websearch/bin/static.py?hl=en&page=guide.cs&guide=1221265&answer=136861&rd=1 28
    29. 29. Google search features 29
    30. 30. 30
    31. 31. http://scholar.google.com/ 31
    32. 32. https://docs.google.com 32
    33. 33. http://translate.google.com/?tab=# 33
    34. 34. RSS • RSS = Really Simple Syndication is a family of web feed formats used to publish frequently updated works—such as entries, news headlines, audio, and video—in a standardized format. • RSS document (which is called a "feed", "web feed", or "channel") includes full or summarized text, plus metadata such as publishing dates and authorship. • Web feeds benefit publishers by letting them syndicate content automatically. • They benefit readers who want to subscribe to timely updates from favored websites or to aggregate feeds from many sites into one place. • RSS feeds can be read using software called an “RSS reader”, "feed reader", or “aggregator”, which can be web-based, desktop-based, or mobile-device-based. • The user subscribes to a feed by entering into the reader the feed's URI or by clicking a feed icon in a web browser that initiates the subscription process. • The RSS reader checks the user's subscribed feeds regularly for new work, downloads any updates that it finds, and provides a user interface to monitor and read the feeds. • RSS allows users to avoid manually inspecting all of the websites they are interested in, and instead subscribe to websites such that all new content is pushed onto their browsers when it becomes available. 34
    35. 35. RSS History & Variants The RSS formats were preceded by several attempts at web syndication that did not achieve widespread popularity. The basic idea of restructuring information about websites goes back to as early as 1995, when Ramanathan V. Guha and other in Apple Computer’s Advanced Technology Group developed the Meta Content Framework. There are several different versions of RSS– – – – – – RSS 0.90 RSS 0.91 RSS 0.92 RSS 1.0 RSS 1.1 RSS2.01 35
    36. 36. What Kind of Information Can be Delivered in RSS Feeds? Ego / News Monitoring Companies or individuals interested in receiving headline news based on a specific brand or keyword can use RSS feeds to monitor news sources. Industry-Specific RSS Feed Uses Include • Technical professionals in specific industries have also developed RSS feeds as way to market, promote or communicate within their specific industries. In many cases, this has expanded their reach and increased communication with current and prospective customers and clients. • RSS feeds can be used by realtors to communicate the time and location for open houses, announce new property listings or promote decreased mortgage rates. • Content feeds can also be used by universities to communicate sports scores or event schedules. Computer service professionals can create feeds to notify clients of potential security breaches, virus risks or outbreaks. Ultimately, RSS is molded to meet the communication needs of many sectors. Consider how RSS can benefit your business and supplement your communication needs. 36
    37. 37. What Kind of Information Can be Delivered in RSS Feeds? Blogs Feed Many blogs are catalogued in an RSS feed, with each blog entry summarized as a feed item. This makes it easy for visitors to scan blog posts for items of interest. Article Feed Articles are often placed into feeds to alert readers when new articles and content are available. The feed entry is typically an article summary or introduction. Readers can then ascertain if the article is of interest and read further. Forum Feed Many forums now have add-ons that allow participants to receive forum posts via RSS. The RSS feeds often will show the latest discussion topics; if users are interested they simply click to enter the forum to participate in the discussion. As the topic is updated they will see new entries in the RSS feed. Schedule Feed Schools, clubs and organizations will often use feeds to communicate meeting times, places and events that might be occurring. The RSS feeds are often used to publicize events, notify the community of schedule changes or meeting agendas. Discounts / Specials Feed Retail and online stores have begun using RSS feeds to deliver their latest specials and discounted offers. Some online retailers have taken this a step further, allowing users to create their own feeds based on keywords or phrases. 37
    38. 38. What are the benefits to having an RSS feed? RSS is beneficial to both publishers and website visitors. To keep things simple I have listed just a few of the benefits for both publishers and website visitors. RSS benefits for publishers: 1. Reaching new audiences through syndication 2. Improved search engine optimization 3. Easier and less expensive vehicle for communication than email. 4. Additional way to communicate with customers or potential customers. RSS benefits for website visitors: 1. Website visitors do not have to release personal information in order to subscribe to an RSS feed. 2. 100% opt-in, users control the content they wish to receive. 3. Faster method for scanning content (saves time) 38
    39. 39. How 2 subscribe RSS Find the RSS icon or button and subscribe. • Websites and blogs that have feeds want you to subscribe. They provide buttons like those seen below. The process is: • Right click on the RSS icon or button. • Select Copy Link Location to copy the URL of the feed. • Go to your RSS Feed Reader. • Paste the URL into your Feed reader. 39
    40. 40. RSS symbols 40 http://rss-tutorial.com/rss-how-to-subscribe-to-feeds.htm
    41. 41. How 2 subscribe RSS http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6q3pzmIausQ 41
    42. 42. 42
    43. 43. Medicine Net.com http://www.medicinenet.com/rss/article.htm 43
    44. 44. Medicine Net.com http://www.medicinenet.com/rss/article.htm 44
    45. 45. Medical news today feeds 45 http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/index.php?page=newsfeed
    46. 46. rss4medics.com http://www.rss4medics.com/directory.html46
    47. 47. rss4medics.com Cancer & Oncology RSS Feeds http://www.rss4medics.com/rss_directory/cancer_feeds.html 47
    48. 48. http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/rss/rss 48
    49. 49. 49
    50. 50. 50
    51. 51. http://www.google.com/alerts 51
    52. 52. 52
    53. 53. 53
    54. 54. THANKS 54

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