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Pharma Front-line Manager - How to Inspire Peak Performance

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Inside this Issue

1. The Dead Sea Effect in Talent Management by K. Hariram
How to avert the flight of top talent from your organization.

2. The Audit Mindset: The Key to Successful Implementation of Compliance Practices in Pharma by Diksha Fouzdar
For companies to become and stay compliant, a thorough change in mindset is needed – from an adhoc approach to a systems approach.

3. Emotional Marketing: From ‘Needs’ to ‘Wants’ by Vivek Hattangadi
Different emotions trigger different actions – a look into different emotional states and how they can be put to use in pharma marketing.

4. Top 20 Things Every Digital Health Marketer Should Know by Dr. Ashwin Bonde
The importance of preparing for the next level of your career by acquiring the requisite knowledge, skills and attitude before you get there.

Published in: Healthcare
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Pharma Front-line Manager - How to Inspire Peak Performance

  1. 1. MEDICINMANField Force Excellence December 2016| www.medicinman.net Indian Pharma’s First Digital Magazine Since 2011 TM E motionally mature leadership is a behavioural skill learnt through reading, observing, be- coming aware of one’s emotions and prac- tice-management of emotions to produce a positive impact on followers. Frontline Managers must be aware of their personal- ity traits and learn to adopt behaviours that inspire, motivate and direct Medical Reps to achieve person- al, team and organisational goals. Learning ‘how-to’ leadership skills is as important as learning‘what-to’ management skills. Unless your team members are energised to perform by how you do things, they will not really care much about what you do. How you do things inspires and influences Reps to do what you want them to do even when you are not around. If front-line management skills are only about methods and targets, without empathy for the challenges faced by Reps, they will not be in- spired to engage their energies to achieve organisa- tional goals. You will have their heads but not their hearts. You must win the Medical Reps’ hearts by demon- strating that you are a person who has come up from their ranks, by the way you do things. Then they will be more open to what you want them to do. How you do things will influence the mood of the Rep to be upbeat, enthusiastic and driven to perform; or anxious, insecure and driven to failure. Inspirational frontline managers are leaders who know that intangibles such as higher morale, team spirit, loyalty and commitment are vital to excel- lence in performance and consistency in business results. An anxious and insecure Medical Rep will be spending more time worrying about his place in the team than focusing on achieving targets. Even a high-performance Rep will be on the lookout for better openings where his talents will be better ap- INSPIRATIONAL FRONTLINE LEADERSHIP EDITORIAL
  2. 2. “ Editorial | Inspirational Frontline Leadership 2 | MedicinMan December 2016 preciated. Reps talk to each other and their mood affects the morale of the team like a contagion. A good front- line manager is aware of these dynamics and takes proactive steps to create a climate in which Reps motivate each other to achieve breakthrough re- sults. The mental make-up of team members is as im- portant as the management methods employed to achieve objectives and targets. The frontline manager has the formidable task of influencing the behaviours of a diverse range of people. Gain- ing emotional intelligence and becoming an emo- tionally mature leader is essential to succeeding in leading the team and managing its productiv- ity as an effective leader-manager who can make decisions, solve problems and lead Reps based not only on knowledge and skills but on character and ethics as well. This will spur your Reps on to engage their energies fully to achieve results for a leader-manager whom they can trust, respect and follow. M  Reps talk to each other and their mood affects the morale of the team like a contagion. A good frontline manager is aware of these dynamics and takes proactive steps to create a climate in which Reps motivate each other to achieve breakthrough results. Connect with Anup on LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter Anup Soans is an L&D Facilitator, Author, Pharma Consultant. Visit: anupsoans.com Meet the Editor
  3. 3. CONTENTS Our mission is the collective improvement of the pharma sales and marketing ecosystem - leading to better relationships with doctors and better out- comes for patients. MedicinMan Volume 6 Issue 12 | December 2016 Editor and Publisher Anup Soans Chief Mentor K. Hariram Editorial Board Salil Kallianpur; Prof. Vivek Hattangadi; Shashin Bodawala; Hanno Wolfram; Renie McClay Letters to the Editor: anupsoans@medicinman.net 1. The Dead Sea Effect in Talent Management ..............................................................................4 How to avert the flight of top talent from your organization. K. Hariram 2. The Audit Mindset: The Key to Successful Implementation of Compliance Practices in Pharma ...............................................................7 For companies to become and stay compliant, a thorough change in mindset is needed - from an ad- hoc approach to a systems approach. Diksha Fouzdar 3. Emotional Marketing: From ‘Needs’ to ‘Wants’ ..............................................................12 At its core, Emotional Marketing is about converting a ‘need’ into a ‘want’. Vivek Hattangadi 4. Top 20 Things Every Digital Health Marketer Should Know ....................................................20 A list compiled by digital health inclusion entrepreneur - Dr. Ashwin Bonde Dr. Ashwin Bonde 3 | MedicinMan December 2016
  4. 4. A recent Facebook posting by the editor of this magazine read as follows: I’m hearing that many qualified and experi- enced pharma sales and marketing people in the 40+ age group, are finding it hard to get the right openings. What is your experience? Why is this happening? It was this question that spurred me to write this article. Many organisations expend tremendous efforts and energy to build a talented managerial team in the initial stages of organisational develop- ment. As the company continues to grow, per- sonnel changes occur within the management team that can negatively impact the rest of the organization’s talent pool. This phenomenon can be referred to as the ‘Dead Sea Effect’ – which is basically saying that in large corporates, the more talented people are the ones most likely to leave because they find it the hardest to put up with the stupidities and inefficiencies in the workplace. Weallknowthatwhilethemosttalentedmanag- ers are great assets to the company, they are the ones more likely to leave for another job when opportunity become available. Because they are capable individuals, they are highly sought after and can find other opportunties with ease. 4 | MedicinMan December 2016  THE DEAD SEA EFFECT IN TALENT MANAGEMENT K. Hariram How to avert the flight of top talent from your organization
  5. 5. Having said this, what should be done to retain, nurture and develop these talented managers? Here are a few pointers: 1. Have a clear understanding of the organiza- tion’s current and future business strategies 2. Have a sound talent management plan de- signed to close the talent gaps. It should also be integrated with strategic and busi- ness plans 3. Focus not just on the talent strategy, but the elements required for successful execution. Talent management professionals need to move from a seat at the table to setting the table. 4. Have a mind-set that talent is a multiplier of value creation in the organization 5. Organise continuous learning and develop- ment programs for talented individuals 6. Talent managers need to own parts of the process and serve as partners, guides, and trusted advisors when it is time to talk talent 5 | MedicinMan December 2016 K. Hariram | The Dead Sea Effect in Talent Management “ The most successful Talent Management initiatives are driven by HR with active and enthusiastic support from the CEO and other senior leaders— who provide the resources, the budget, the communication and support necessary for success. Figure 1: Percentage of Senior HR and CEOs that play an active role in talent management
  6. 6. 7. Increase the involvement of CEOs in Talent Management. This is something that is still extremely neglected. Look at figure 1 8. The most successful Talent Management initiatives are driven by HR with active and enthusiastic support from the CEO and other senior leaders— who provide the resources, the budget, the communication and support necessary for success. The emphasis should be on FOUR complemen- tary components – 1. Competencies 2. Personal Attributes 3. Knowledge 4. Experience The bottom-line approach to avoid the DEAD- SEA EFFECT is: when it comes to managing the talented people, it is all about the ‘hows’ rather than about the‘whats’. M 6 | MedicinMan December 2016 K. Hariram | The Dead Sea Effect in Talent Management K. Hariram is the former MD (retd.) at Galderma India. He is Chief Mentor at MedicinMan and a regular contributor. khariram25@yahoo.com
  7. 7. 7 | MedicinMan December 2016 A udits and regulations go hand-in-glove in the pharmaceutical industry. The recent instances of the damage to the reputations of eminent companies because of their inability to ensure compliance, goes to prove that organizations can no longer afford to ignore audit as a management practice. There is definitely a case for change in the way audits are being approached by organizations. Unfortunately, Indian pharma companies are still struggling to decode the audit puzzle. What is the reason behind increasing trend of OAIs each year, despite regulatory expertise, world class manufacturing and quality control pro- cesses and fiscal might?  For companies to become and stay compliant, a thorough change in mindset is needed - from an ad-hoc approach to a systems approach. Diksha Fouzdar THEAUDITMINDSET: THE KEY TO SUCCESSFUL IMPLEMENTATION OF COMPLIANCE PRACTICES IN PHARMA
  8. 8. 8 | MedicinMan December 2016 After witnessing audits from close quarters, inter- acting with the business leadership and analyzing the reasons for non-compliance, I can conclude that the major barrier to performance is the ab- sence of the right AUDIT MINDSET. Defining the Audit Mindset According to Arbinger Institute’s concept on mind- set, every organization operates along a mindset continuum, which has an impact on its culture and performance. It is imperative to understand the mindset which goes behind audit management. This article will analyze the current audit mindset, touch upon the challenges it poses and attempt to provide some solutions. AUDIT MINDSET in particular touches upon how the organization perceives audits and its belief in the ability to manage the audit lifecycle. The existing mindset and its limitations In the absence of an evolved audit practice, phar- ma organizations have been leveraging work be- haviors like individual technical competence, task orientation and relationship management to sail through audits. These behaviors have gotten rein- forced over the years and nurtured complement- ing skill sets at leadership and middle manage- ment levels. The leadership operating style is fragmented and myopic, focusing only on immediate gains (“clear the audit now and manage the rest later”attitude). The decisions are not thought through, taken without consensus-building and forced down the system, bypassing procedural checks or requiring exceptions. As a result, the middle management is left with very little breathing space to think, suggest and act. They work in execution mode, clocking man- hours of effort in creating systems and process- es which are poorly conceptualized, drafted and linked. They may look compliant when reviewed in a standalone manner but the gaps are visible when checked against multiple systems.  Diksha Fouzdar | The Audit Mindset: The Key to Successful Implementation of Compliance Practices in Pharma “ AUDIT MINDSET, in particular, touches upon how the organization perceives audits and its belief in the ability to manage the audit lifecycle.
  9. 9. 9 | MedicinMan December 2016 This audit management style creates systemic loop holes and complex processes managed by inexpe- rienced/untrained staff leading to concerns related to data integrity, procedures and quality during audits. The Way Forward Agency expectations are changing, from retro- spective analysis of data and records to futuristic assessment of the intent, integrity and quality stan- dards of organizations. This calls for a more strate- gic, organized and methodical approach towards the audit practice. Some critical aspects which can be leveraged to create the right mindset and insti- tutionalize audit practice are shared below: Leadership - To start with, the leadership has to assimilate the changed audit philosophy and in- ternalize certain best practices of the domain. The enhanced perspective (vision) will enable the leadership to transition from the role of an inter- nal auditor to a facilitator, which is more inclusive, providing long term plans and facilitating the de- velopment of compliant work practices (processes, systems and structures) and capability. Systems - There is an urgent need to develop sys- tems orientation across the organization as audits are centered around data and records generated by these systems. While there are multiple systems to support the processes, there are as many chal- lenges. Firstly, the systems are not aligned and linked, creating data islands. Adding to it, the data is not maintained in a standardized format across the sys- tems, causing data discrepancies.  Diksha Fouzdar | The Audit Mindset: The Key to Successful Implementation of Compliance Practices in Pharma DID YOU KNOW? Approximately 219 Official Actions indicated for violations and non compliance during in- spections by US FDA in India since 2010. Top 4 areas where deficiencies were observed: 1. Quality Issues 2. Procedural issues 3. Data integrity 4. People capability
  10. 10. 10 | MedicinMan December Also these systems have very low adoption rates (limited or no formal training given to employees) because of which employees do not understand and use the systems to their maximum potential and have low confidence in the data generated. Last but not the least, systems thinking in general will help in efficient process design and risk assess- ment. Once the management’s audit philosophy is de- fined through suitable processes and systems, it should then be supported by right team structures. Structures - It is commonplace to create internal audit teams, either post audit notification or after the submission of management’s response to the agencies. These teams have no role clarity or de- fined purpose. They operate with high authority but show zero accountability and are seen as inef- fective in getting things done. It is advisable that organizations start building au- dit COE with some key responsibilities. This COE will act like a catalyst in understanding the audit expectation (agency expectations), interpreting change in regulatory guidelines and translating it for the leadership and the organization at large. It will work in tandem with core functions, audit agencies and leadership for the implementation of audit practices and help them stay aligned to the overall compliance objective. Apart from this, they have another critical responsibility that is to help the management prepare the response post audit, in terms of identifying the right scope, stakehold- ers, process owners and timelines and corrective actions which in reality makes or breaks audit out- comes.  Diksha Fouzdar | The Audit Mindset: The Key to Successful Implementation of Compliance Practices in Pharma “ It is advisable that organizations start building audit COE with some key responsibilities. This COE will act like a catalyst in understanding the audit expectation (agency expectations), interpreting change in regulatory guidelines and translating it for the leadership and the organization at large.
  11. 11. 11 | MedicinMan December Another systemic practice which can be introduced by the COE is around sharing the audit feedback not only with the top management but also with the employees down the line for better organiza- tional learning and on-ground compliance. The teams should then be infused with right kind of capabilities to render them effective. Capability - First and foremost the leadership should invest heavily in the development of the middle level on both behavioral and technical aspects. Secondly, the role of technical training along with the learning and development function should be leveraged in such situations, by way of innovating SOP, regulatory, quality policy related trainings. The trainings should be able to address intrinsic organizational needs as basic as “How to write effective SOPs” or training front line employ- ees to face audits. Also, the judicious investment in capability development will reduce their depen- dency on external pharma consultants and build a workforce which is equipped with right skills and mindset to face audits. In conclusion, I would like to reiterate that it is up to the leadership to define the successful audit mind- set for their organizations by how they lay down the work values and behaviors, create systems and structures and invest in capability development. M  Diksha Fouzdar | The Audit Mindset: The Key to Successful Implementation of Compliance Practices in Pharma Diksha Fouzdar is sea- soned HR professional with keen interest in Organization Design and Development. She has a rich experience of working in the phar- maceutical sector and likes to write about her observations and experiences, studying the intricacies of organization and people behavior and how they get impacted with change in global practices, technology and new workplace trends.
  12. 12. 12 | MedicinMan December I n the first two parts of this series (MedicinMan Octo- ber and November 2016) we learnt about the pow- er of emotions in communication and the different types of emotions and the importance of arousal. Your communication should arouse a feeling of‘want- ing’rather than‘needing’in your doctor’s mind. Stir the emotional center in your customer’s brain and convert a need into a want. Needs include the basic things required for our surviv- al like food, clothing, a roof our over head or a job. Wants, however, are always emotional. Whenever we buy something, it is because the purchase satisfies a want. It may or may not, satisfy an actual need. “Wants” and “needs” are not synonyms; neither are these terms interchangeable. While needs are the ba- sic necessities for survival, wants are emotional. You want it for different reasons. Wants follow needs.  EMOTIONAL MARKETING: FROM‘NEEDS’TO‘WANTS’ Vivek Hattangadi At its core, Emotional Marketing is about converting a ‘need’ into a ‘want’.
  13. 13. “Abraham Maslow has beautifully explained this concept in Maslow’s Pyramid of Hierarchy. If you want to increase prescriptions for your brand, it is crucial for a brand manager to recognize the wants of a doctor, unless you are calling a doctor in a charitable dispensary. Consider this: you need a vehicle for going from Point A to Point B. A bicycle can take you there, or may be a mobike; so you need a bicycle or a mo- bike. But if you want to satisfy your ego (an emo- tion), you want only a Mercedes. You need a shirt but you want a Louis Philippe as it makes you feel superior (an emotion). You need a mobile but you want the Apple i7 and may even wait for the Apple i8 to be launched. When wants and needs are in sync, selling is rel- atively easy. But when wants are in conflict with needs, danger looms. Because whenever a want conflicts with a need, the want always wins. For instance, you are promoting a cough syrup based on needs, but the doctor wants something else – then there will be no prescription. Figure out the wants your cough syrup will satisfy. Converting a need into a want is the brand manag- er’s skill in creativity and communication. The state of‘needing’is an emotional state – it caus- es your doctors to become attached to the specific outcome that your cough syrup offers. If a brand manager can identify the wants of the target audience, he has set into motion the brand building process. Use of TRUST in Emotional Marketing Trust is integral to building successful brands. Trust reinforces confidence and influences choice of the user. Trust builds brand loyalty. Trust is one of the most common emotions used by marketers to communicate advertising messages. Whether it is a mutual fund manager, an e-commerce website or a jewelry store telling a bride who makes a wed- ding purchase, trust is a strong emotional benefit that drives sales. Trust creates positive perceptions in the minds of customers. 13 | MedicinMan December  When wants and needs are in sync, selling is relatively easy. But when wants are in conflict with needs, danger looms. Because whenever a want conflicts with a need, the want always wins. Vivek Hattangadi | Emotional Marketing: From Needs to Wants
  14. 14. See this advertisement of HDFC Mutual Fund and the trust it is able generate. Nonetheless, with the emotion of trust comes a very deep expectation from the customer. This ad says: “INVESTORS UNDERSTAND THAT THEIR PRIN- CIPAL WILL BE AT MODERATELY HIGH RISK”. It can- didly acknowledges the risk, making this product a trustworthy product for those want to gamble in risk. This mutual fund therefore can be relied on. ‘No Risk’or‘Low Risk’customers will not invest here. On the next page is an ad of a jeweler. It so beauti- fully communicates you can depend on this jewel- er for its authenticity and style. It further qualifies the trust by saying: “…find out why San Diego has trusted them for 30 years…”. Today, doctors are unforgiving when those prom- ises of faith, trust and security are broken. In case there is inconsistency in your brand message and experiences on trust, the breach of trust can be devastating for you brand. With trust comes responsibility to meet the prom- ise. 14 | MedicinMan December  Vivek Hattangadi | Emotional Marketing: From ‘Needs’ to ‘Wants’ “ Today, doctors are unforgiving when those promises of faith, trust and security are broken. In case there is inconsistency in your brand message and experiences on trust, the breach of trust can be devastating for you brand.
  15. 15. Case Study Look at OlaCabs for instance. OlaCabs, commonly known as Ola, is an online transportation network company. Ola started as an online cab aggregator in Mumbai, and is now based out of Bangalore. The promise of OlaCabs: (Source - www.olacabs. com) 1. Convenience: Book within seconds and get instant confirmations. 2. Quality: Our cars are audited for cleanliness, safety and comfort. Our drivers are well trained and reliable. 3. Spread love, ride free! My actual experience 1. Reliable: You get instant confirmation but the drivers do not turn up. At the last moment you get a SMS that the driver has initiated cancel- lation. 2. Well trained drivers: Drivers do not know how to respond to passengers. Ill-trained and lack basic manners and culture. 3. Audited for Safety: How can your rides be safe when drivers keep on talking on their mo- biles while driving? 4. Drive free: The driver tells you that he will come only if he is paid cash – there are no free rides. 5. The Olacab driver in Bangalore doesn’t know the way to M.G. Road! All these have been recorded in my complaints to OlaCabs. 15 | MedicinMan December  Vivek Hattangadi | Emotional Marketing: From Needs to Wants
  16. 16. The promise of OlaCabs? Their actions are weak and inconsistent with their promises. The credi- bility of OlaCabs is very low. The OlaCabs iceberg has started melting from the bottom, and eventu- ally can capsize and the company may even close down. In other words, don’t let your doctors down or they’ll quickly turn away from your brand in search of another that can fulfill their emotional needs of trust. Any brand can claim to be trustworthy. In that sense, trust can be considered a soft differentiator. Without quantifiable or tangible proof that a brand is trustworthy, the message of trust can fall on deaf ears. Every airline claimed it was trustworthy. However, after the financial crisis of Kingfisher and Spice Jet, the flier’s perceptions of airlines changed significantly. Today, fewer fliers believe Spice Jets claims of being trustworthy. Our brand messages should increase oxytocin lev- els in doctor’s brains. Why? Research has shown that people who trust more have higher levels of oxytocin in their brains. Here is the Colquitt-Scott- LePine Equation Trust = An individual’s propensity to trust times Expectations about a trustees future behavior.1 Why do some brands, like Becosules in Pharma In- dia, never seem to fade? It is because of trust cus- tomers have built; a coherent relationship of trust to the brand.This trust comes from its brand equity and Pfizer has brilliantly leveraged this. Indigo Airlines has used the trust element delight- fully – trusted for punctuality. Indigo Standard Time stands for punctuality. Indigo Airlines has won the trust of fliers that it is a punctual airline and this emotional message of trust distinguished Indigo Airlines from others. In less than 7 years of existence it went on to beat Jet Airways (introduced in 1992) to become the leader. Its tag line – IST (Indigo Standard Time) – evoked the trust of fliers. And they strive hard to keep this promise. 16 | MedicinMan December  Vivek Hattangadi | Emotional Marketing: From Needs to Wants “ ...trust can be considered a soft differentiator. Without quantifiable or tangible proof that a brand is trustworthy, the message of trust can fall on deaf ears.
  17. 17. Case Study In the Indian pharma market, take tinidazole. Tini- dazole was introduced by many top Indian compa- nies but could not make a dent in the amoebicidal market. It remained a very poor runners-up to met- ronidazole. When Pfizer introduced Fasigyn, it gave tinidazole the much-needed shot-in-the-arm and all of a sud- den this market became buoyant. Fasigyn could inspire the trust and confidence of prescribers. It was this trust and the conviction which Pfizer used to make it the #1 brand in the amoebicidal market. Eventually, not only did the tinidazole market grow but replaced the metronidazole market in a short time. M 17 | MedicinMan December  Vivek Hattangadi | Emotional Marketing: From Needs to Wants Vivek Hattangadi is a Consultant in Pharma Brand Management and Sales Training at The En- ablers. He is also visiting faculty at CIPM Calcutta (Vidyasagar University) for their MBA course in Pharmaceutical Management. vivekhattangadi@theenablers.org References 1JasonA.Colquitt,BrentA.Scott,andJeffery A. LePine. Trust, Trustworthiness, and Trust Propensity: A Meta-Analytic Test of their Unique Relationships with Risk Taking and Job Performance. Journal of Applied Psychol- ogy 2007,Vol. 92, No. 4, 909–927
  18. 18.   THE FUTURE OF PHARMA SALES & MARKETING PARTNER WITH US. anupsoans@gmail.com   FEBRUARY 2017 A MedicinMan annual event FFE + CEO ROUNDTABLE AND BRANDSTORM 2017
  19. 19. FFE + CEO ROUNDTABLE AND BRANDSTORM 2017February Field Force Excellence conference + CEO Roundtable is targeted at senior industry professionals in all functions. The CEO Roundtable is the highlight of the event and fea- tures some of pharma’s most well-known leaders. Past topics include: • Practical Issues in Sales Force Effectiveness (SFE) imple- mentation • Role Clarity from Front-line Manager to National Sales Manager • Role of Technology as a Field Force Multiplier • Social Learning for the Field Force • Data Analytics: Actionable Insights for Segmented Mar- keting • Role of Marketing, Medical, HR and L&D in Building the Rx Capabilities of the Field Force • Navigating UCPMP, MCI Guidelines and other regulato- ry issues • Reinvention of Doctor-Field Force interaction through Digital and Social Past Speakers include: • Sanjiv Navangul – Managing Director, Janssen India • K. Shivkumar – Managing Director, Eisai • Sujay Shetty – Partner, PwC India • CT Renganathan – Managing Director, RPG LifeScienc- es • YS Prabhakar – CEO, Sutures India • Ali Sleiman – General Manager India, Merck Serono • Darshan Patel – Partner, PwC • Vikas Dandekar – Editor Pharma, ET • Shakti Chakraborty – Group President, Lupin • Ganesh Nayak – (fmr) CEO and Executive Director, Zydus Cadila • Bhaskar Iyer – Divn VP, India Commercial Operations, Abbott • Narayan Gad – CEO, Panacea Biotec • Girdhar Balwani – Managing Director, Invida • K. Hariram - Managing Director (retd.) Galderma India BrandStorm is targeted at Brand Managers. The event features thought leaders in pharma brand management addressing the hottest topics of the day. Past topics include: • UCPMP & MCI Guidelines – Implication for Pharma Marketing • Brand Building: Case Studies from the Indian Pharma Market • Unleashing the Power of Digital Marketing – Case Studies • From Brand Management to Therapy Shaping • Marketing to Hospitals • Case Study: Zifi-AZ • Field Force – Doctor Interaction through use of Digi- tal and Social Media • How to Optimize Healthcare Communication Cre- ative Agency Services Past Speakers include: • PV Sankar Dass – CEO & Director, CURATIO • Darshan Patel – Partner, Pricewaterhouse Coopers • Daleep Manhas – General Manager & Associate Vice President at McCann Health • Praful Akali – Founder-Director, Medulla Communi- cations • Pankaj Dikholkar – General Manager, Abbott • Salil Kallianpur – Executive Vice President - Primary Care, GSK • Deep Bhandari – Director-Marketing & Sales Excel- lence, UCB • Shiva Natarajan – General Manager, GSK • Shashank Shanbag – Business Unit Director, MS • Nandish Kumar – DGM and Head – Marketing, FD To partner at the event contact: anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-968-680-2244 FFE+CEO RT BRANDSTORM
  20. 20. While Doctors still turn to well known journals and KOLs for therapy-area updates, they also turn to the internet whenever they have 10 min- utes in hand Having a sound knowledge of digital tools and platforms certainly helps even if you outsource your digital marketing efforts Patients are looking for affordability Infographics and visuals are in!Text is on the way out! The biggest issue facing the doctor is how to maintain sanity within the deluge of information A conversation is always more appreciated than a monologue/ push marketing 20 | MedicinMan December  A list compiled by digital health inclusion entrepreneur - Dr. Ashwin Bonde TOP 20 THINGS EVERY DIGITAL HEALTHCARE MARKETER SHOULD KNOW Dr. Ashwin Bonde 1 2 3 4 5 6
  21. 21. “ Dr. Ashwin Bonde | Top 20 Things Every Digital Health Marketer Should Know 21 | MedicinMan December New content categories are emerging – tech up- dates, fintech, ad tech, practice hacks Do less but do it well. Quality and ease are differ- entiators. Clearly demarcate personal and professional space on spocial media Make use of data and analytics Credibility is key! Have clearly defined success metrics Prepare for crisis situations Have a good strategy for lead generation Therapy specificity/ personalization is important User experience and design matters more than ever White space is bigger than grey area Often diseases are non-symptomatic but very un- comfortable for patient; so the gap between pri- ority for doctors and patients looking for solution (often self-medication) needs to be bridged For existing customers we need more focus on in-clinic engagement – before, during and after appointment.  “ Do less but do it well. Quality and ease are differentiators. User experience and design matters more than ever 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  22. 22. Dr. Ashwin Bonde | Top 20 Things Every Digital Health Marketer Should Know 22 | MedicinMan December Don’t be possessive, your audience is human, and are unlikely to love you as much as WhatsApp! What has changed in last few years and will keep evolving is the connectivity to information which has improved for doctors and customers; so it’s all a question of harnessing this changed landscape and not a question of digital or offline. Regardless what we just discussed, we all know how difficult it is to make a business case to the boardroom. Hail to the Victors! M  20 Dr. Ashwin Bonde is co-founder of ‘Pulsewell’, a digital health inclusion startup. He studied ‘Dig- ital Health’ at Univ. of Michigan-Ann arbor and has worked with MSD, Sanofi, IMS Consulting.

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