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Pharma Field Sales Learning and Development

The ultimate measure of a learning program is when employees are able to take it to their work and succeed in real life situations.

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Pharma Field Sales Learning and Development

  1. 1. MEDICINMAN Field Force Excellence TM November 2014 | www.medicinman.net HOW TO EAT AN ELEPHANT Since 2011 Even in progressive pharma companies that implement the strategy of Regional Training Managers (RTMs) to ensure continued learning on the field, the focus is on improving science and selling skills of Medical Reps (MRs) and not on the Performance Coaching Skills of Front-line Managers (FLM). The efforts of RTMs without the active participation of FLMs is bound to be minimal; never transformational. Transformation happens when FLM, who has the largest and direct influence on Medical Reps takes on the role of a Performance Coach under the guidance of RTM. The FLM is the only person who can connect learning to performance and influence his team members to learn on a daily basis - eat the elephant, one bite a day. FLMs must be made to realize that only by enhancing the capabilities of their MRs continuously, will their job of achieving targets become easier. Learning must lead to changed behavior and improved performance; otherwise learning and development will remain a peripheral activity and not a strategic Transformational learning and development at the front-lines might seem a daunting task but is possible when the RTM develops the FLM to be a coach to his MRs.
  2. 2. Editorial Connect with Anup Soans on LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter Anup Soans is an Author, Facilitator and the Editor of MedicinMan. Write in to him: anupsoans@medicinman.net Meet the Editor intervention to equip field force to respond to market dynamics in real time. People wait for the next annual classroom training session (a kind of paid holiday or harassment, depending on the culture of the company) and so it goes on; convincing business heads that learning and development is no more than a ritual of lighting lamps at festive occasions. This lip-service to learning and development is at the root of dispirited performance of MRs. Today’s technologically empowered era, can make learning and development a daily ongoing activity that transforms the thinking and behavior of field force. A careful examination of an MR’s routine reveals the 80:20 factor in time utilization. 80% of the time is spent waiting for calls and only 20% of time in actually interacting with doctors. Unless this 80% of time is spent productively, the 20% time with doctor is nothing more than ‘marking attendance to please prescribe routine’. Technology has the capability to transform the 80% waiting time into learning time to address the specific needs of the doctor and will actually EXPAND the window of interaction. Companies that are able to do this will differentiate themselves where it matters most - inside the doctor’s chamber. People Power is the key to increase productivity as other DIFFERENTIATORS (Product, Promotion, Price) have become GENERIC. According to an article by Lisa Roner, (eyeforpharma.com), ”More than 100 respondents from 20 pharma companies, including eight of the largest drug makers, said that in spite of being in charge of overseeing thousands of Reps in the field, FLMs themselves aren’t given the necessary training to improve their own skills.” Delta Point says: “A significant gap exists between the importance placed on skills that enhance customer relationships and the training structure and opportunities that pharmaceutical companies are currently providing managers.” If this is the case in developed markets, the situation in India could be much worse. It’s a ‘given’ that Medical Reps and Front-line Managers (FLMs) form the back-bone of Pharma sales. Yet, this importance does not translate to action in terms of equipping front-line people with capabilities that will empower them to excel through continuous learning. When the field force is trained regularly like the NSG commandos and not like their counterparts, the police constables, they will become fighting fit to win the marketing warfare. A survey by MedicinMan with over 440 respondents clearly demonstrate that field sales people in the 18 - 30 age group (MRs and FLMs) consider Learning and Development as the most important factor after salary for job satisfaction. And it is quite clear that without adequate training, people cannot perform their tasks effectively leading to low job satisfaction and high attrition. If you have decided that a field force is necessary to increasing market share, then why not invest in developing their capabilities? ” Transformation happens when FLM, who has the largest and direct influence on Medical Reps takes on the role of a Performance Coach under the guidance of RTM. The FLM is the only person who can connect learning to performance and influence his team members to learn on a daily basis - eat the elephant, one bite a day. For more on how develop your FLMs into performance coaches with the ability to achieve breakthrough performance at the front-lines read “SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager” (see page5)
  3. 3. MedicinMan Volume 4 Issue 11 | November 2014 Editor and Publisher Anup Soans CEO Chhaya Sankath COO Arvind Nair Chief Mentor K. Hariram Advisory Board Prof. Vivek v; Jolly Mathews Editorial Board Salil Kallianpur; Dr. Shalini Ratan; Shashin Bodawala; Prabhakar Shetty; Vardarajan S; Dr. Mandar Kubal; Dr. Surinder Kumar International Editorial Board Hanno Wolfram; Renie McClay Executive Editor Joshua Soans MedicinMan Academy: Prof. Vivek Hattangadi, Dean, Professional Skills Development Letters to the Editor: anupsoans@medicinman.net 1. Learning as Competitive Advantage.................6 Real learning with measurable outcomes and not simply training, has the power to give company’s a competitive advantage over peers. Gopal Kishore 2. Supply Chain Management as a Strategic Function.................................................................10 Companies must go beyond the “logistics” mindset to turn SCM into a strategic tool K. Hariram 3. Multi-channel Marketing Strategy ..................12 Moving from the traditional sales-person driven strategy to one that incorporates digital multimedia Md. Sadique Akhtar 4. The Art of Effective Business Meetings..........15 Business meetings can either produce great outcomes or completely disengage your team members. Here’s how to practice the fine art of getting it right. Subrat Kumar Roul 5. Real World Evidence in Drug Development ..18 Extensive datasets are produced in the process of treating patients. This valuable data can be captured, analyzed and be used for better decision-making. Jaideep Kaneria, Mahendra Kumar Rai & Richa Goyal 6. PHARMA MARKETING EXCELLENCE AWARDS 2014........................................................................20 A photo collage and the list of winners (Click to navigate) CONTENTS 18 6
  4. 4. CAREER PROGRESSION RESOURCES AT NEVER-BEFORE PRICES!! NOW AVAILABLE ON (click on the books to purchase on flipkart) SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager is a tool to help pharma professionals transition from super salesmen to great front-line managers and leaders. The book will equip front-line managers to Manage, Coach, Motivate and Lead their teams to deliver outstanding performance. An engaging read, filled with examples and illustrations, SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager has been used by thousands of managers across the industry. HardKnocks for the GreenHorn is a specially crafted training manual to enable aspiring Medical Representatives to gain the Knowledge, Skills and Attitude needed to succeed in the competitive arena of pharma field sales. Medical Representatives joining the field are often not aware about the key success factors of their job and as a result they get discouraged when things don’t go as planned. HardKnocks for the GreenHorn meets the needs of both first-time Reps and field sales managers. The book is a powerful learning and motivational tool and has been used by thousands of pharma professionals to take their career to the next level. RS 799 299/- (Limited period offer. Till stocks last) RS 599 199/- (Limited period offer. Till stocks last)
  5. 5. 5 | MedicinMan November 2014 “The only thing that gives an organization a competitive edge . . . is what it knows, how it uses what it knows, and how fast it can know something new. -Laurence Prusak A century ago, when the industrial revolution was at its zenith, most companies invested in fixed assets – from manufacturing units, corporate offices and equipment. Fast-forward to today, and the focus has shifted from fixed assets to human capital. Learning as a tool for competitive advantage Employees have benefited from this shift in terms of better working spaces, access to healthcare and other perks. The companies that will benefit from this shift are the ones that invest in training and development. By continuously upgrading their employee’s knowledge, skills, and performance, companies are aiming for great-er productivity of their human capital to get a competi-tive advantage. By nurturing talent across the ranks, from the frontline employee to the CEO, and developing key skills such as leadership, dealing with change and innovation mar-keting among others, organizations are showing their commitment to invest in training and development. They are investing in the future of their workforce and E Learning as Competitive advantage Gopal Kishore In each area the digital strategy should look at the benefits these technologies have for your business, assess its current performance and make recommendations over the short and long term. Gopal Kishore is an Experiential Learning Evangelist @KNOLSKAPE Real learning with measurable outcomes and not simply training, has the power to give company’s a competitive advantage over peers.
  6. 6. ” 6 | MedicinMan November 2014 the organization through powerful learning oppor-tunities. But training alone rarely improves performance. Learning does. Unfortunately, learning, in many organizations, is still looked as an afterthought. Of course, there are a quite a few organizations that may even have comprehensive training programs, but the question is whether they go beyond mere training to instill learning in the fabric of the organization Creating a learning environment One needs to ask the right questions such as: ww What is the role of learning in the organization? ww How to build the right culture to enable learning? ww How do I justify learning and derive business bene-fit? ww How scalable is the learning program? To meet this need for continuous learning, every training program must ensure that they are using the right content and information, creating an open culture and using an effective delivery mechanism. The Right Content and Information This is the most critical aspect of any learning pro-gram. The right information needs to be delivered to the right audience, at the right time and in the right manner. Since content is constantly changing, it becomes extremely important to select the right content and organize it in a manner that is easily accessible and shareable. No two departments are the same, and customizing the content is also crucial. However, every department may have certain similar requirements, which can be addressed by an overar- To meet this need for continuous learning, every training program must ensure that they are using the right content and information, creating an open culture and using an effective delivery mechanism. Gopal Kishore | Learning as Competitive Advantage
  7. 7. 7 | MedicinMan November 2014 ching learning program. In the era of specialization, it is important to go with the sniper approach, rather than the spray and pray method. This will help in ad-dressing the precise learning needs of the individual, business unit and the organization. Creating an Open Environment Another important aspect is to enable a culture of learning and sharing. Open access to information and peer-to-peer knowledge transformation not only helps in creating a learning organization, but also brings about a transparency and trust that have mul-tifold effect on the value system of the organization. When learning is hoarded, and people are fearful that someone else might improve using the learning that is being shared, an organization cannot grow. Hence it is important for organizations to incentivize and encourage the culture of learning and sharing. Effective Delivery Mechanism The value of great learning content and an amazing learning culture can be realized only when there are effective delivery mechanisms in place. If this information is not delivered to the right audience in a timely manner, then the effort in creating the content is lost. Care should be taken that normal work activ-ities are not disrupted, is easy to access and of value to the end user. In this era of globalization and a workforce across multiple geographies and time zones, a delivery mechanism which can enable anytime anywhere learning, motivate the users to not only complete the training program but also enjoy the process, is an extremely important requirement. Making Learning Stick The ultimate measure of a learning program is when employees are able to take it to their work and succeed in real life situations. This is where new age training methodologies driven by technology play a role. Using gamification and simulation can help employees take the learning beyond the classroom and benefit from the program. This is also crucial for the organization to justify its’ investment and gain business benefit. -GS Gopal Kishore | Learning as Competitive Advantage ” To meet this need for continuous learning, every training program must ensure that they are using the right content and information, creating an open culture and using an effective delivery mechanism.
  8. 8. A new book by Renie McClay published by ASTD Press is apt for the global executive with a local vision. “The Art of Modern Sales Management” has 12 chapters, each written by a leader in the field from around the world. Renie McClay, MA, CPLP, has been a dynamic performance improvement professional for 20 years. She has been successful in sales, management, and learning and performance roles at several Fortune 500 companies (Kraft, Pactiv, and Novartis). Founder of Inspired Learning LLC, she continues to bring her passion and practical approach to all project work. Inspired Learning LLC does design and delivery of energetic programs and projects around the world. Now available for readers in India on Kindle and print on Amazon. Download a free chapter of the book here. The Art of Modern Sales Management is a must read for any global sales leader. It's practical, relevant, and grounded in the experience of seasoned sales professionals who make a significant difference in the organizations that they serve. This book includes many useful tips and actionable ideas that any sales leader can use. --Kimo Kippen, Chief Learning Officer, Hilton Worldwide Renie has done a great job of selecting thought leaders that speak to the challenges of selling in our new, connected world. I absolutely love the framework of the book and found myself skipping from one chapter to another based on what I thought was most relevant to the problems I am most interested in solving today. This book is a must for anyone that understands that front-sales management is tomorrow’s competitive advantage. --Pat Martin, VP of Sales, Estes Express With a chapter on “Managing Across Cultures” contributed by Anup Soans Renie is on top of her game again and brings the A Team to the world of Modern Sales Management. With the explosion of social media and the immediacy of shared experience for buyers and sellers, The Art of Modern Sales Management is a practical guide to navigating these changing realities, and the action plans offered provide tools to ensure the best opportunity for success. If you have a leadership role within the sales organization, you need this book as a guide and resource. --Gary Summy, Director of Business Development Global Accounts Operations, Xerox Corporation
  9. 9. 9 | MedicinMan November 2014 Do you remember the pharmaceutical industry three decades ago? The word ‘supply chain’ did not exist in its vocabulary. The word was ‘distribution’ became ‘logistics’ and today it is all about ‘supply chain management’ (SCM). I recently had the opportunity to address over 100 SCM professionals of Indian Pharma, in a seminar organized jointly by ISCM (Institute of supply chain management) and OPPI (Organization of pharmaceu-tical producers of India) on “Unlocking the Value of Pharmaceutical Supply Chain”. The excellent quality of presentations and delibera-tions from an array of discerning speakers threw some valuable insights into the current status and the future potential including possible way forward. The current status of Pharmaceutical SCM 1. There are three areas (as per recent McKenzie survey report) in SCM that were assessed and rated as follows vv Service – good vv Cost & capital deployed – inadequate vv Capabilities – needs improvement While there has been evolution in the process, sys-tems etc, there is lot to be done. K. Hariram E SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT AS A STRATEGIC FUNCTION K. Hariram is the former MD (retd.) at Galderma India. He is Chief Mentor at MedicinMan and a regular contributor. khariram25@yahoo.com
  10. 10. 10 | MedicinMan November 2014 2. CEOs continue to look at the SCM department and operations as a ‘cost’ centre and hence the focus is mostly on efficiency – doing the right things. 3. SCM has two distinct parts – I) Logistics and ii) Supply chain. Logistics relate to the operational part and the SC relates to the strategic part. However SCM continues to focus on moving goods - operations (lo-gistics) from one place to the other to ensure availabil-ity for month end billing. 4. The strategic part is still missing in the pharma SCM. Largely this is due to lack of buying in by all concerned and also piece meal approach. 5. There is a wide gap between market demand, sales and sales forecasting – a lack of congruence in the whole cycle. 6. Pharmaceutical operations and IT have traditionally been in-house operations. So the dealings with vari-ous external stake holders such as suppliers, custom-ers and distributors are mainly transactional. 7. There is high level of inventory at all levels along the channel resulting in high costs. (See Fig 2 for a snap-shot of comparison of inventory levels) 8. There is a lack of infrastructure to ensure availabil-ity of the medicines at the recommended storage conditions. Hence not sure of the quality to the end customer – the patient, who pays. TRANSFORMATION – THE WAY FORWARD There is an urgent need to transform Pharmaceutical SCM through new operational and technology ver-sions to enable greater Collaboration, Efficiency and Agility. Becoming agile will mean making far-reaching changes to the pharma organization and its culture— think in terms of revolution, not evolution. The focus areas are:- vv Active involvement from the CEO of the organiza-tion. vv A resilient and long lasting strategy is the starting point for an agile supply chain keeping the cus-tomer (patient) in focus. vv Embrace demand-chain thinking and cloud-based solutions to become more agile, flexible and able to share data in real-time with business partners, from contract manufacturers, through third-party logistics providers and retailers. (Source: Cogni-zant report). This should result in optimization of inventory levels and drastically reduce the product expiries across the channels (look at FMCG). K. Hariram | Supply Chain Management as a Strategic Function Fig. 1 ” The strategic part is still missing in the pharma SCM. Largely this is due to lack of buying in by all concerned and also piece meal approach.
  11. 11. 11 | MedicinMan November 2014 vv Establish an effective IT strategy to capture growth opportunities vv Improve the supply chain mix move products be-tween locations and channels according to market conditions, thus reducing product, overhead and inventory costs (including expiry returns cost) while improving the service to customer vv Align SCM with the overall business strategy and building a strong cross-functional collaboration with all stake-holders – inside and outside the organization. vv Use the right metrics to build transparency into performance vv Adopt an end-to-end model and foster connectiv-ity (not silos) vv Critical to all these is executing and managing the day-to-day aspects of transformation From an optimistic view, one can certainly say that SCM professionals have exciting days ahead with the focus being more on processes rather than on com-plexities. - KH K. Hariram | Supply Chain Management as a Strategic Function ” This brings us to the point as to why reputation is important. For corporates, a strong reputation helps attract resources (human, financial, etc.), provides support to marketing initiatives and provides leverage in a crisis situation. Fig. 2 For more insights into Supply Chain Management read HardKnocks for the GreenHorn Click to Purchase online RS 599 199/- (Limited period offer. Till stocks last)
  12. 12. 12 | MedicinMan November 2014 Pharmaceutical, Medical Device and Life Science (PML) industry continues to evolve more dynamically with key market opportunities in hand Key Drivers of the Pharmaceutical, Medical Device and Life Science (PML) industry || Rate and pace of portfolio commoditization || Shift in stakeholder influence at market level || Growing scrutiny of regulatory bodies and the growing criticality of offering value || Requirements to drive greater efficiency and effectiveness in commercial practices overall || Misallocation and misalignment of promotional spending PML Industry is predominately operating under common objectives: || Launch into a changing and emerging market more effectively || Explore new efficiency and effectiveness in current commercial model || Evaluate and develop new marketing strategies based on major and emerging markets scenario || Align marketing strategies across pharmerging markets while addressing major markets that are flat to declining in opportunity Moving from the traditional sales-person driven strategy to one that incorporates digital multimedia E Multi- channel marketing Strategy Md. Sadique Akhter is the CEO and President – Global Vox Populi EMAIL: sadique.akhter@globalvoxpopuli.com Md. Sadique Akhter
  13. 13. Sadique Akhtar | Multi-channel Marketing Strategy 13 | MedicinMan November 2014 || Find new sources of growth and align commercial, R&D and investment decision in the best way Irrespective of the market scenario, field force has been the major thrust; but market changes has increased the need for a solid multi-channel strategy Irrespective of the market scenario, field force has been the major source of revenue to the company; however, market changes has increased the need for a dynamic-practical multichannel strategy Questions for Pharmaceutical, Medical Device and Life Science players || “Which alternative channels are being used currently? Globally? By whom?” || “What are the benefits and costs of alternate channels?” || “Will traditional ways of promoting products to be replaced? To what extent? By what means?” || “If so, is there a first mover advantage, or should we wait until leading models emerge?” || “Are there regulations and/or legal restrictions for choosing new channels?” || “Do we use one multichannel strategy for the whole portfolio or customized approach for each product/product group?” || “How do we integrate with current marketing group, measure success and ROI?” The Building Blocks of Multi-Channel Marketing High-level Multi Channel Marketing Strategy
  14. 14. Sadique Akhtar | Multi-channel Marketing Strategy 14 | MedicinMan November 2014 Multichannel Marketing Solutions: || Health Care Practitioner (HCP) information and insights derived from such an effort will help to maximize brand strategy and segmentation while allowing for reinforcement of brand messages, particularly where direct-to-consumer advertising also is leveraged. || A well-devised strategy can help to appropriately identify and recognize key HCPs across multiple channels. || Channel integration and a multi-touch point strategy can deliver a differentiated customer experience for each HCP (Cadence and frequency are important to story flow). || Channel innovation – using best practice and the best technologies – provides for a seamless delivery of the desired customer experience. That is the communication mix for HCPs can be optimized using intelligent business rules based on expressed and observed preferences and usage. || Coordinated channel execution supports the design, delivery, monitoring and measurement of solutions for HCPs. Using best practices helps ensure better return rates and measurements. || Keeping HCPs engaged exclusively with the brand, in addition to engaging them in related non-branded channels sponsored by the manufacturer, will support a measurable ROI Multi-Channel Marketing Key Success Factors: || Align to the brand strategy and creative platform while integrating direct marketing tenets and channel best practices || Incorporate a segmentation strategy that considers product lifecycle, prescribing behavior, motivational attributes and rep call pattern || Motivate segment-specific behavioral changes through differences in messages and offers || Deliver the message through an integrated mix of channels while considering the HCP’s channel preference || Consider the company’s channel capabilities || Deliver a measurable business impact - SA Business-as-usual Marketing Strategy
  15. 15. THE ART OF EFFECTIVE BUSINESS MEETINGS 15 | MedicinMan November 2014 The real value business meetings has always been debatable. Managers and participants look at these meetings very differently. The manager essentially thinks of it as a platform to drive a common objective in a limited timeframe, when, barring few, most of the participants see it as a fault-finding platform where the chances of get-ting screwed is very high. This is true for all but the few well-planned and well-communicated meetings. So what actually makes the difference? Is it the objective of the meetings? Is it the content? Is it the way it is communicated? Is it the manager? Or is it the participants? The answers to these questions may vary from person to person. But one thing that can be accepted unanimously is that the way the stage is set prior to the meeting can make a lot of differ-ence. All the other factors mentioned above are really constants where the chances of making a change is very minimal. But the way the meeting is approached has much scope for change that can positively impact the outcomes of meetings. Here are 10 common mistakes a manager gener-ally commits which may jeopardize the outcome of a meeting. Meeting without a proper objective Many-a-time business meetings are held as a matter of routine. Participants come to these meetings with preset expectations, lowering the chances of anything new being learnt. A manager needs to define very clearly what the group is expected to achieve after the meeting. Subrat Kumar Roul Subrat Kumar Roul is a pharma field sales professional Business meetings can either produce great outcomes or completely disengage your team members. Here’s how to practice the fine art of getting it right E Sales managers at every level talk about your, their, the company’s and others’ “performance”. Often you can hear them talk about “high-performing teams” or “low-performing reps”. The core question is what they mean with this word, which often is used to start or justify managerial consequences. ”
  16. 16. 16 | MedicinMan November 2014 Subrat Kumar Roul | The Art of Effective Business Meetings Lack of preparation A lack of preparation can jeopardize the all the resources and time spent on the meetings. Lack of preparation on the part of the manager will create disinterested participants and lead to poor outcomes. Fixing the meeting without consent of all the participants Getting the basic consent of participants is essential as a gesture of respect to them. An imposed meeting may lead to disengagement. Ignoring local festivals and holidays Big meetings are generally managed at a macro level without taken into consideration local festivals and holidays. Care needs to be taken before deciding the dates of meeting, so that it does not clash with the holidays for a group of participants. A disengaged participant is not only a waste of time and money but may be counter-productive at times. Choosing an inappropriate venue A poor choice venue may take away from the importance of the meeting. The venue should have a decent ambience without distractions. Choosing a suitable hall is very important. Exceeding Timelines Absence or improper agenda may again derail the flow of meeting. A time-keeper should be appointed so that everyone and every issue gets adequate attention. It’s important to finish the meeting on time so that the impact on participants is not lost. Starting on a negative note An honest attempt should be made to find out few appreciative points about the group to start with. Opening up the mind leads to better reception of ideas. Avoid being overly critical at beginning by pointing out flaws of the group. An honest attempt should be made to find out few appreciative points about the group to start with. Opening up the mind leads to better reception of ideas. Avoid being overly critical at beginning by pointing out flaws of the group. ”
  17. 17. 17 | MedicinMan November 2014 Being biased in approach A leader is being watched for all his actions. All the participants should be given equal chance to participate. Over appreciation or under estimation of any participant may actually disrupt the thinking of others. One should try to be fact-based and avoid getting personal. Ending the meeting without getting a consensus Many managers commit the mistake of finishing the meeting without getting a consensus. Assumption regarding the success of the meeting should be challenged and reality-check from the participant should a must. Not keeping Minutes Circulating the minutes of meeting is as essential as conducting the meeting. A detailed , time bound, individual action plan with accountability need to be circulated amongst all the participants with agreed-upon timeline for follow-up regarding the progress. Conclusion Middle line managers need to be courageous enough to pass on the issues of the frontline team mates to the senior management so that any burning issues at the field level can be addressed on priority. An engaged field force will lead the organization to newer heights. Meetings are the first and basic platform to impart ideas to the implementers. A well planned meeting will increase the engagement level of implementers leading to higher productivity and an unplanned meeting will create disengaged implementers and poor outcomes. - SKR Subrat Kumar Roul | The Art of Effective Business Meetings Middle line managers need to be courageous enough to pass on the issues of the frontline team mates to the senior management so that any burning issues at the field level can be addressed on priority. An engaged field force will lead the organization to newer heights. ”
  18. 18. 18 | MedicinMan November 2014 The life sciences industry is majorly focused on providing innovative medicines for better patient outcomes and value for the healthcare system. Real world evidence (RWE) helps to inform and advance the value propositions for investigational compounds. Real-world data is anything other than randomized controlled trials (RCT) generated data which includes data derived from prospective observational studies, non-interventional observations, database studies, prospective registries, retrospective databases, medical records and data abstraction. RWE highlights the intersection between unmet medical needs and the potential for innovation to meet these requirements and provide value to patients, providers, and payers. Using RWE to support clinical and commercial decisions require more than access to the right information. Extensive datasets are produced in the process of treating patients. This valuable data can be captured, analyzed and be used for better decision-making. E Real world evidence in drug development Jaideep Kaneria, is Associate Vice President- Life Sciences at Tata Consultancy Services Mahendra Kumar Rai is HEOR Lead & SME at Tata Consultancy Services Richa Goyal, HEOR Lead & SME at Tata Consultancy Services
  19. 19. Jaideep Kaneria, Mahendra Kumar Rai & Richa Goyal | Real World Evidence in Drug Development 19 | MedicinMan November 2014 Healthcare organizations also need a technology infrastructure for managing and interrogating these complex information sets. RWE can help us in many ways such as what drugs we should develop, how to develop and how to get market access in an accurate medi-cine framework. There are a lot of efforts to cap-ture RWE - whether from a written medical chart or electronic medical records or lab data. The potential of the RWE can be realized only if elec-tronic collection of health information is made available throughout the healthcare system. As the demand of evidence through real world increases, the pharmaceutical companies should ensure that it is available to appropriate health care decision makers so that they can assess the effectiveness, safety, comparative effectiveness and the value of different treatments. Strengths/benefits of RWE Real world studies present effectiveness data rather than efficacy data presented in traditional RCTs. Also, real word studies present data for multiple interventions from the routine clini-cal practice. Other strengths/benefits of RWE include • Long-term benefits and harms • Diverse population • Broader range of outcomes • Present resource use data • Dosing, compliance, adherence • Confirmatory of RCTs ” As the demand of evidence through real world increases, the pharmaceutical companies should ensure that it is available to appropriate health care decision makers so that they can assess the effectiveness, safety, comparative effectiveness and the value of different treatments. Clinical Economic Patient reported • Biological measures of morbidity (e.g. blood pressure, cholesterol levels, symptoms, adverse events) • Mortality • Surrogate and Long-term measures • Medical and non-medical resource utilization • Costs- Medical, non-medical • Symptoms • Functional status • HRQoL • Treatment satisfaction • Preference and adherence Outcomes in RWE
  20. 20. 20 | MedicinMan December 2013 PHARMA MARKETING EXCELLENCE AWARDS 2014 AIOCD AWACS
  21. 21. 21 | MedicinMan November 2014 E Top 20 AIOCD AWACS Market Excellence Award Winners 2014 21-50
  22. 22. 22 | MedicinMan December 2013 xxx | yyy 50 and above

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