Medical Rep to President - Inspiring Story of Subroto Banerjee

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Inside this Issue
1. In Conversation with Subroto Banerjee by Anup Soans

Subroto Banerjee shares his thoughts on what’s driving Indian pharma and what’s holding it back.

2. Ten Steps to Becoming a Leader-Manager by K. Hariram

10 ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts’ for new and aspiring people- managers and team leaders.

3. Overcoming Attention Deficit Disorder in Everyday Detailing by Dineish Pardesi

Pharma selling is an art that requires the combination of scientific value-add and presentation skills to make an impact in the mind of the Doctors.

4. Visual Card: An Alternative to Visual Aid? by Mayank Bedi

A digital card with product information can add a new dimension to in-clinic interaction.

5. Drivers of Sales force Effectiveness by Prof. Vivek Hattangadi

A refresher on what Sales Force Effectiveness (SFE) is and is not.

6. The OTC Market in India: Some Growth Drivers by Kumud Kandpal

Socio-economic changes that are driving the growth of the OTC market in India.

7. Chai pe Charcha by Kailash Khatod

10 lessons learnt by a Product Manager (PM) from the Prime Minister (PM) of India.

8. Artwork by M.Pharm student Varsha Phirke

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Medical Rep to President - Inspiring Story of Subroto Banerjee

  1. 1. MEDICINMANField Force Excellence TM June 2014 | www.medicinman.net ofemployee satisfaction W hy are employees in restaurants like Café Coffee Day seemingly happier than in MNC pharma companies? For that matter why is it that Medical Reps in Mankind Pharma are happier than most other better paying companies? Attrition in Mankind is rare and field force is far more productive even in specialties like cardiology. Sometimes little things make a big difference. Employees are not machines that can be driven by efficient processes alone. They need the motivation to make the processes work. According to a Harris Interactive Poll, 67 per cent of employees are dissatisfied because of: 1Inability to get information needed in timely manner. The best of the Indian companies suffer from this malady. Even good information takes its own sweet time to reach the people at the ground level. Field sales are probably one of the loneliest jobs. Quality of information and timely dissemination of information can do wonders to the morale and enthusiasm. Take a survey today from your field force people to know their level of satisfaction and their pain points instead of introducing the newest software to increase productivity. It is the concern for the people and their feelings that can improve this score. 2Too Much Paper Work. This problem is endemic. Paper might have been replaced by spreadsheets, but managers who should be spending time with their team members or customers and busy filling spreadsheets for the sadists at the head office! Examine what report is critical and what is peripheral. There must be a single window approach to demanding reports from field sales people. 3Organisation is not up to date with the latest technology. Pharma is a laggard when it comes to adopting the latest technology. I have friends in pharma who are still using the archaic Windows Explorer. Many of them complain to me about being unable to access MedicinMan regularly. We have made the process so simple, yet these worthies must get everything in PDF file through email! Some of them ask for personal information like mobile number via email, when it is possible to get the same just by Googling my name! Editorial Since 2011 Top5Killers amongFieldforce
  2. 2. Anup Soans | Editorial: Top 5 Killers of Employee Motivation 4Organization has the technology but co-workers don’t use them to the full potential. Why invest scarce resource in technology if there is not follow-up mechanism to ensure its full utilization? Employees who are laggards in adopting technology must be given the help that make them to cross the divide quickly instead of pulling everyone else down with their lethargy. 5Don’t understand the process, rules and regulations. Can there be anything more ridiculous than this? Yet company after company fails in clarifying to their employees what is expected of them vis-à-vis their roles and as a result, what happens is something this funny narrative illustrates: This is a little story about four people named Everybody, Somebody, Anybody, and Nobody. There was an important job to be done and Everybody was sure that Somebody would do it. Anybody could have done it, but Nobody did it. Somebody got angry about that because it was Everybody’s job. Everybody thought that Anybody could do it, but Nobody realized that Everybody wouldn’t do it. It ended up that Everybody blamed Somebody when Nobody did what Anybody could have done. What steps are you going to take to remove these minor irritants that have a major impact on employee satisfaction? -AS 2 | MedicinMan June 2014 Connect with Anup Soans on LinkedIn | Facebook | Twitter Anup Soans is an Author, Facilitator and the Editor of MedicinMan. Write in to him: anupsoans@medicinman.net Meet the Editor “Sometimes little things make a big difference. Employees are not machines that can be driven by efficient processes alone. They need the motivation to make the processes work.”
  3. 3. *INR 800/- for 1 copy of both the books inclusive of Speed Post charges. Contact anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-93422-32949 to make a purchase. MRP Rs. 599/- “When the only tool you have is a hammer, every problem looks like a nail.” Stop hammering away at your role as a front-line pharma professional and get the right tools for the job! MRP Rs. 799/- Special 1+1 offer A1,398 800/- * HardKnocks for the GreenHorn and SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager are best-selling books that have been widely used to develop and motivate front-line pharma professionals. Written by industry veteran Anup Soans, these books will give you the Knowledge, Attitude, Skills and Habits (KA$H) to succeed in you role as a Medical Rep or Front- line Manager.
  4. 4. 1. In Conversation with Subroto Banerjee of Strides Arcolab.........................................................5 Subroto Banerjee shares his thoughts on what’s driving Indian pharma and what’s holding it back. Interviewed by Anup Soans 2. Ten Steps to Becoming a Leader-Manager.....9 10 ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts’ for new and aspiring people- managers and team leaders. K. Hariram 3. Overcoming Attention Deficit Disorder in Everyday Detailing.................................................16 Pharma selling is an art that requires the combination of scientific value-add and presentation skills to make an impact in the mind of the Doctors. Dineish Pardesi 4. Visual Card: An Alternative to Visual Aid?.......18 A digital card with product information can add a new dimension to in-clinic interaction. Mayank Bedi 5. Drivers of Sales force Effectiveness................20 A refresher on what Sales Force Effectiveness (SFE) is and is not. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi 6. The OTC Market in India: Some Growth Drivers .................................................................................23 Socio-economic changes that are driving the growth of the OTC market in India. Kumud Kandpal 7. Chai pe Charcha.................................................25 10 lessons learnt by a Product Manager (PM) from the Prime Minister (PM) of India. Kailash Khatod 8. Artwork by M.Pharm student Varsha Phirke.27 MedicinMan Volume 4 Issue 6 | June 2014 Editor and Publisher Anup Soans CEO Chhaya Sankath COO Arvind Nair Chief Mentor K. Hariram Advisory Board Prof. Vivek Hattangadi; Jolly Mathews Editorial Board Salil Kallianpur; Dr. Shalini Ratan; Shashin Bodawala; Prabhakar Shetty; Vardarajan S; Dr. Mandar Kubal; Dr. Surinder Kumar International Editorial Board Hanno Wolfram; Renie McClay Executive Editor Joshua Soans MedicinMan Academy: Prof. Vivek Hattangadi, Dean, Professional Skills Development Letters to the Editor: anupsoans@medicinman.net CONTENTS (Click to navigate)
  5. 5. 5 | MedicinMan June 2014 Anup Soans: Can you tell us something about your journey in the Indian Pharma industry? Subroto Banerjee: Unlike most people, I started my career, as a Medical Representative by choice. Most of my career, I have worked in oncology, nephrology, critical care and other specialty therapy areas. By working up the ladder, I gathered all the required expertise at different levels of management. I have worked in great organizations like Farmitalia, Biological E, Dr. Reddy’s, Dabur Pharma and currently with Strides Arcolab Limited. The two pillars of my journey are the key opinion leaders (KOLs) and my teams. I owe all the success to the great teams that I have worked with and am proud to have such great KOLs as friends. AField Sales produced many leaders like you. What do you think are the reasons for decline in the quality of field force and what measures can reverse the trend? SI believe that the current generation is far more intelligent than what we were at the start of our careers. The challenge is attracting these intelligent people to pharma. Job opportunities in India have increased manifold and unfortunately, pharma is lagging behind many sectors in terms of being a preferred career In Conversation E With Subroto Banerjee of Strides Arcolab Anup Soans | In Conversation with Subroto Banerjee Subroto Banerjee joined Strides Arcolab in March 2012 as President India region responsible for the BU which included the brands business and specialty injectables business in therapy areas like Oncology, Nephrology and Critical Care. After acquisition of the injectables business of Strides by Mylan, he is responsible for the brands business in India. Along with P&L responsibility, he is also responsible for building up sustainable front-ending capabilities and to develop and execute the long term plan to emerge as a sizeable player in the Indian Pharmaceuticals space.
  6. 6. Indian Pharma needs complete image make- over. I hardly see any student aspiring to make a career in pharma. Indian Pharma must undertake image building measures in the colleges and universities. Our industry leaders must be more visible in different forum to influence the society positively. Anup Soans | In Conversation with Subroto Banerjee 6 | MedicinMan June 2014 option. Thus, we tend to get the left overs. Indian Pharma must attract girls and boys from the academia and train them according to needs of the industry. There must be a syndicated approach towards this effort of attracting talent. Indian Pharma needs complete image make-over. I hardly see any student aspiring to make a career in pharma. Indian Pharma must undertake image building measures in the colleges and universities. Our industry leaders must be more visible in different forum to influence the society positively. After all pharma is an evergreen sector with abundant growth opportunities both in the domestic and international market. All that is needed is a clear focus to attract and develop talent, so that people have a better career progression. AAre pharma management institutions serving their purpose and how can they adapt their curriculum to the needs of Indian Pharma? SI am working with an institution of repute and am happy to mention that they seem to be doing a very decent job. However, the true learning for the students will happen with more real time projects and interaction with the industry. Seminars and group discussions with industry leaders is a good way to add value to their curriculum. AWhat is your assessment of current crop of product managers and what are the areas for improvement? SWhile we see a good crop of brand managers, the focus must be more on the patient and therapy area. The industry will be driven by ailments which are chronic in nature. Thus the patient will remain in touch with the brand and the organization for many years. Product managers must keep this in mind and build sustainable strategies towards building the bridge between the patient and the organization, of course keeping the doctor in the loop. Product managers must have the bigger picture in mind in addition to driving the day to day execution of strategies. They must focus on driving strategies for mid-term and long term growth. AWhat are some areas in Indian Pharma where digital technology and social media can have beneficial impact? SDigital technology and social media can be a major platform for health awareness and patient education. This can also serve as a common communication platform for all the patients and they can be encouraged to share their experiences and victories. We must also use the burgeoning social media to create a positive image for the industry. “ ” In Conversation
  7. 7. The industry is currently facing the fall of the DPCO and going forward stringent regulations in the domestic market are expected. I see this as an opportunity to focus on increased volumes and make medicines accessible for a great number of Indians. Anup Soans | In Conversation with Subroto Banerjee 7 | MedicinMan June 2014 AWhat other trends do you see impacting Indian Pharma? SOTC medicines are an encouraging trend and will become a major market in the next decade. The informed and conscious Indian will take to common OTC products. Trends show that areas like aches/pains, cough, colds, hyperacidity, minor topical infections, and indigestion are major OTC categories. AWhere do you see the Indian Pharma industry in the immediate, medium and long term? SThe industry is currently facing the fall of the DPCO and going forward stringent regulations in the domestic market are expected. I see this as an opportunity to focus on increased volumes and make medicines accessible for a great number of Indians. The healthcare infrastructure is expected to grow both through government and private investments and the pharma industry must bank on this development to make medicines available to millions of people who hitherto did not have access to quality medicines. Many of the existing Fixed Dose Combinations (FDCs) have also been challenged by the regulators. The industry will now have to establish the clinical and safety justifications of such FDCs. This again will bring more efficiency and transparency in the system. Though the last few quarters have been tough for the domestic market, I feel this is temporary and we will see increased volume growths. We should get back to the 12% – 14% growth phase soon. The industry will be driven by increasing affordability, shifting disease patterns and healthcare reforms. The market is set to reach $ 20 billion mark by 2016 and will move to world’s top 10 pharma markets. AWhat are some key areas that Indian Pharma must take care of, to ensure success in the domestic and global markets? SIn the domestic area we must be able to make medicines accessible to increased number of patients. In the mid-term horizon this in itself will lead to a huge and purposeful growth. The industry must set targets of increasing access year on year till we achieve global standards in this area. A very strong partnership model must be built up with the government to ensure access to quality medicines for the poor. “ ” In Conversation
  8. 8. Anup Soans | In Conversation with Subroto Banerjee The industry and the state governments must agree to develop a model for the purchases made for BPL patients. We must invest heavily on quality and regulators must be more stringent towards the fly-by-night operators. There should be much stricter entry barriers into this industry. Investing on the right people and the best practices will ensure growth in the longer term. We must focus on building people capabilities. We must understand the key requirements of patients and doctors and try to offer solutions. For this we need teams who are passionate towards the cause. The recent initiative by six pharma giants (LAZORR) is a good example of improving efficiencies and bringing down input costs in the supply side. Many such activities need to be initiated. I feel that the Indian industry should focus on the following: 1. Shift from market share capture to market creation. 2. Adopt new differentiated business models. 3. Product access 4. Strengthen sales & marketing capabilities -MM “ In Conversation Abdul Basit Khan Ajay Kumar Dua Amlesh Ranjan Amrutha Bhavthankar Andris A. Zoltners Anthony Lobo Aparna Sharma Arvind Nair Atish Mukherjee B. Ramanathan Chayya Sankath Craig Dixon Devanand Chenuri Venkat Dinesh Chindarkar Dr. Amit Dang Dr. Aniruddha Malpani Dr. Hemant Mittal Dr. Neelesh Bhandari Dr. S. Srinivasan Dr. Shalini Ratan Dr. Surinder Kumar Sharma Dr. Ulhas Ganu Geetha G H H. J. Badrinarayana Hakeem Adebiyi Hanno Wolfram Hitendra Kansal Iyer Gopalkrishna Jasvinder Singh Banga Javed Shaikh Jitendra Singh John Gwillim Jolly Mathews Joshua Mensch K Hariram K. Satya Mahesh Ken Boyce Mahendra Rai Mala Raj Manoj Kumar Juneank Saigal Milan Sinha Mohan Lal Gupta Neelesh Bhandari Neha Ansa Nishkarsh Likhar Noumaan Qureshi Parveen Gandhi Pinaki Ghosh PK Sinha Prabhakar Shetty Vivek Hattangadi Rachana Narayan Rajesh Rangarajan Ralph Boyce Renie McClay Richa Goyel Richard Ilsley RM Saravanan Sagar S. Pawar Salil Kallianpur Salil Kallianpur Sally E. Lorimer Sandhya Pramanik Sanjay Munshi Shafaq Shaikh Shalini Ratan Sharad Virmani Shiv Bhasin Spring Sudhakar Subba Rao Chaganti Sudhakar Madhavan Tony O’Connor V. Srinivasan Varadharajan K. Vijaya Shetty Vishal V. Bhaiyya Vishal Verma Vivek Hattangadi William Fernandez Our Authors MEDICINMAN invites contributions from Pharma professionals on topics related to Field Force Excellence. See: www.medicinman.net/author-guidelines for more information.
  9. 9. 9 | MedicinMan June 2014 Getting promoted and becoming a Manager (FLM) requires a shift in outlook, approach and development of tenacity—qualities that aren’t usually taught in MBA schools or in company training programs. A report from Corporate Executive Board states that, “Nearly 60 percent of the Front Line Managers un- der-perform during their first two years and more than 50 per cent would rather not manage people.” So, what do successful Managers do that works so well and make them future leaders? While there are many aspects, here are the top 10 aspects (in reverse order) that will help YOU become a better Manager: 10. Get your priorities right 1. Your Team members and Customers come first 2. Context-based participation and progress mean everything 3. Coach and empower your team members 9. Be willing to take reasonable risks. 1. Go the extra mile to challenge the‘status quo’for your team members. 2. Don’t take“no”for an answer easily 3. Encourage creative problem-solving 8. Be open to new and challenging ideas 1. Always look out for new and creative ways to im prove performance. 2. Engage in rigorous practice to achieve expertise (skills are performed fluently, with ease and speed). K. Hariram E 10STEPSTO BECOMINGA LEADER-MANAGER10 ‘do’s’ and ‘don’ts’ for new and aspiring people managers and team leaders. K. Hariram is the former MD (retd.) at Galderma India. He is Chief Mentor at MedicinMan and a regular contributor. khariram25@yahoo.com A report from Corporate Executive Board states that, “Nearly 60 percent of the Front Line Managers under- perform during their first two years and more than 50 per cent would rather not manage people.” “ ”
  10. 10. 10 | MedicinMan June 2014 7. Understand and manage change - systemic and human. 1. Be a patient problem-solver and carefully work within your organizational systems. 2. Constantly look for tipping points (small things that help people change). 6. Achieve situational mastery over challenging market scenarios. 1. Display confidence and control over your work place. 2. Win others through bedrock leadership ideas and beliefs. 5. Do a few things well, rather than many things poorly 1. This applies across your team and customers 4. Have a clear PURPOSE and goal for everything you and your team does 3. Continuously update your own knowledge and skills 2. Insist on teamwork, consultation and collabora- tion 1. Develop excellent LISTENING skills Becoming a better manager isn’t always about the tangible skills, expertise or energy. You need to hone the above intangible skills, too. -KH K. Hariram | 10 Steps to Becoming a Better Leader-Manager “ ” Be a patient problem- solver and carefully work within your organisational systems. Constantly look for tipping points (small things that help people change).
  11. 11. EMPOWER YOUR FIELD FORCE KA$H=CASH REPEAT Rx Pharma-specific Training: Medical Representatives Field Sales Managers Senior Managers Learning and Development Programs from the Leaders in Pharma Field Force Excellence Signature Programs for Medical Representatives Constructed on the fundamental premise that a Medical Representative’s success depends on his Knowledge, Attitudes, Skills and Habits (KA$H). Representatives seek success in their personal and professional lives but look for it in the wrong places leaving them frustrated. Companies and bottom-lines suffer when the front-line is not ful- ly engaged. KA$H=CASH is a high-engagement module for customer-facing employees. Repeat Rx is an advanced module for customer-facing Representatives based on the book by Anup Soans. Repeat Rx focuses on building lasting relationships with Doctors by creating value through a process of Calling Connecting Consulting Collaborating with the Doctor. At each stage of this Four Stage process the Represen- tative acquires measurable skills and competencies that enable him to add value in the Doctor’s chamber. Repeat Rx comes with detailed evaluation tools. In Any Profession, More KA$H = More Cash KNOWLEDGE  ATTITUDES  SKILLS  HABITS MEDICINMAN
  12. 12. SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager. WHY SHOULD ANY- ONE FOLLOW YOU? THE HALF-TIME COACH anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Signature Programs for Front-line Managers Signature Programs for Second-line and Senior Managers Based on the best-selling book by Anup Soans, this program is for new and experienced Front-line Managers who would like to get breakthrough performance from their teams. SuperVision for the SuperWiser Front-line Manager focus- es on topics such as Team Building, Emotional Intelligence, Situational Leadership, Coaching and more. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* The Half-Time Coach is based on the concept of half-time in football. If half-time is so crucial in a game that last only 90 minutes, how much more important in a career that last a life time. The Half-Time Coach is a learning-by-reflection program with a focus on Coaching Skills for senior managers. Mod- ules also cover Self Awareness, Emotional Intelligence, Em- ployee Engagement and Sales Change Management. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* A walk-the-talk program for cross-functional senior managers to understand the process of employee engagement, creating trust and building relation- ships to build and sustain high-performance teams. VALUE ADD: Psychometric Assessment* *Psychometrics assessments give in-depth insights into one’s personality preferences and its impact on interpersonal relationships and teamwork.
  13. 13. anupsoans@gmail.com | +91-934-2232-949 | www.medicinman.net Methodology Webinars and E-Learning All programs are fully customizable. A pre-program questionnaire is used to capture the needs and expectations of the participants. Company’s June request a demonstration of a particular module at no expense (except conveyance to venue). Programs incorporate the principles of adult learning and are highly participative, audio-vi- sual and activity-based. Important truths are conveyed through games, stories and videos. Companies are advised to give participants the books on which the programs are based for continued learning and development. The same June be procured from the author at a discount. Company’s June choose to deliver a program as a webi- nar - giving the advantage of scale and lowering costs. Audiences are kept engaged using visually stimulating slides and powerful delivery. Emphasis is placed on taking charge of one’s success, even in the absence of oversight. Most recently 1,000 reps of a leading MNC were trained over four webinars with excellent feedback. Customized issues of MedicinMan, with inputs from the company can be given to the Field Force for their continuous learning and development. MedicinMan currently reaches 60,000 pharma professionals. Interactive Classroom Training Management Games Audio/Visual Learning-by-reflectionSimulation Case Studies iSharpenMMy Success is My Responsibiliti
  14. 14. KOLManagementWorkshop A MEDICINMAN Initiative OBJECTIVE: This workshop will be hands on approach to understanding the challenges and identifying solutions to help you develop an effective KOL management strategy. TARGET AUDIENCE - Field Force people responsible for KOL management - Marketing team people involved in KOL management - Medical Affairs people engaged in KOL management - Members of existing KOL management team - MSLs responsible for KOL Management - Company shortlisted candidates for KOL management TOPICS (included, but not limited to:) 1. Moving from a Sales Mindset to KOL Relationship Management Mindset 2. Understanding Factors that Lead to KOL Satisfaction 3. Effective Communication – The Key Skill for KOL Relationship Management 4. Understanding and Executing Effective KOL Relationship Management program 5. Interaction and Q A with a leading KOL OUTCOME: 1. Clear understanding of issues in KOL Management 2. Fine tuning existing KOL management programs 3. Developing a KOL management strategy and plan 4. Executing the KOL strategy WORKSHOP DURATION: 1 Day WORKSHOP MATERIAL: Delegate notes - synopsis of the workshop WORKSHOP COORDINATOR: Knowledge Media Venturz CONTACT: Chhaya Sankath: +91-98674-21131 | chhaya@kmv.co.in Arvind Nair: +91-987-0201-422 | arvind@kmv.co.in Worshop Date: 12th July 2014 WorkshopTimings: 10:00 am - 04:00 pm Venue: Luxury Hotel, Mumbai Total seats: only 25 Registration fees:R5,000+tax WORKSHOP LEADER: Anup Soans Anup Soans has worked as a Medical Rep, Oncology Product Specialist and Front-line Manager in Pharma. Later he moved to IJCP, a pioneer in CME, medico marketing, healthcare communication, where he rose to become the Executive Director. At IJCP, he was responsible for identifying, developing and sustaining a mutually rewarding relationship with over 300 KOLs in all major specialties for 12 years. Many of the leading and emerging KOLs identified and nurtured by Anup Soans went on win prestigious awards like the Padmashri and Dr. B.C. Roy awards among others.
  15. 15. KOL WORKSHOP REGISTRATION FORM Workshop date : Saturday 12th July 2014 Workshop timings: 10:00 am to 04:00 pm Venue : Luxury hotel, Mumbai Total seats: 25 Only Name : Designation / Title : Company Name : Company Address : Phone : Email : In case of multiple delegates from the same organization please fill up individual registration forms for each member. Registration Details Registration fees: INR 5000 + 12.36 %Service tax (Per Delegate) The Fees is inclusive of Lunch Tea Snacks (Morning Evening) Payment must be made in INR by Cheque / Bank Draft or NEFT on or before 7th of July 2014. Cheques to be issued in the name of KNOWLEDGE MEDIA VENTURZ LLP , payable at Mumbai sent to The Conference Secretariat, A-302, Kshitij C.H.S.L, Off Film City Road, Behind Satellite Towers, Goregaon East, Mumbai 400063. NEFT Details Bank Name : AXIS BANK Bank Address: Goregaon West, Mumbai (MH), Gr Flr, Patkar College, S V Road, Goregaon West, Mumbai -62. Account Name : KNOWLEDGE MEDIA VENTURZ LLP Account No : 913020033732313 IFSC Code : UTIB0000647 For further details Contact: Arvind Nair Chhaya Sankath 9870201422; arvind@kmv.co.in 9867421131; chhaya@kmv.co.in
  16. 16. I n the era of digital marketing iPad presentations may take over traditional printed Visual Aids. However, generating interest in product promotions is becoming increasingly difficult. Medical Reps have little time to impress the doctor because every company is operating with several divisions and each generic molecule has more than 40-50 brands. Indian pharma companies are not just copying molecules, they are copying one another’s business strate- gy as well - of multiple divisions. In this scenario, in-clinic interaction has lost its appeal. Background: Doctors have become sales-savvy because they are dealing with the best and worst sales presentations day in and day out: from MNCs and branded generics to PCD companies. On the other hand, Medical Reps are limited to the line of communication provided by product managers who focus on drawing the doctor’s attention to PRICE as the differentiator in most cases. Secondly, POSITIONING the brand with indication, latest articles and trial updates is stale and ineffective in today’s context of one molecule, fifty brands and two hundred scientific reports! Marketing managers have to conceive a concept that attracts the doctor’s attention; prepare a lucid and memorable message, which can be delivered without any distortion by the Medical Rep. Dinesh Pardesi 16 | MedicinMan June 2014 Pharma selling is an art that requires the combination of scientific value-add and presentation skills to make an impact in the mind of the Doctors. E OVERCOMINGATTENTION DEFICITDISORDERIN EVERYDAYDETAILING Dineish Pardesi is a pharma professional.
  17. 17. 17 | MedicinMan June 2014 The Problem: Indian Pharma is blindly following the West and is focusing on SFE, ACE and what not! Highly technical talent and resources are employed in building sales force effectiveness to monitor and classify doctor calls. ACE is employed to analyse commer- cial viability of a doctor call. This has turned marketing from field based reality into virtual reality of spreadsheets and var- ious data outputs. Where does marketing get its inputs from anyway? It gets it from field sales people. The person who cre- ates and owns SFE and ACE has never worked in the field and the field sales people who provide the inputs are alien to its outcome. The irony of the situation is that power and control has shifted from field to the head office and responsibility and accountability has shifted from head office to the field. The Solution: Despite the dawn of digital era, Medical Reps are the only vital link between the company and doctors and this makes them a special people. Competent senior Medical Reps are aware when time is scarce and use words economically. Being com- mitted to results, they do a lot of homework before making a call, like pre-approach and gauging the environment, mood of the doctor, his likes and dislikes, inclination to the topic and so on. There is no way where you can predict the sales outcome by putting in values in the spreadsheets or by following ORG-IMS and C MARC data. Market information is going to be dynamic and will remain a manual skill of Medial Reps and front-line managers. Systematic RCPA is needed to understand the mar- ket potential. RCPA will give the number of prescriptions and key prescribers as well as knowledge of competitive brands in the territory. This requires patience and special talent to ask relevant and random questions from important persons working at various pharmacies. Now that you have the list of key prescribers, rope in right customers and provide the right impetus. By this I mean, you must know what will shift his attention from the brand he is currently using to your brand. This can happen by generating genuine interest. How? Now this cannot be taught in any school of pharmaceutical man- agement. It comes from being on the field, awareness, keen interest, analysing and synchronising the data of doctor’s prescribing habit. As doctors begin to respond to your efforts, engage them in an ethical way and ensure that you fulfill his need of patient-centric CME of practical use. Finally, do not take the doctor for granted; you have to renew the relationship as if it is new love and always keep the passion alive. Remember, selling is an art and Visual Aid is an artist’s brush to paint an attractive picture of your products in the doctor’s mind. -DP Dineish Pardsesi | Overcoming Attention Deficit Disorder in Everyday Detailing “ ” Despite the dawn of digital era, Medical Reps are the only vital link between the company and doctors and this makes them a special people. Competent senior Medical Reps are aware when time is scarce and use words economically. Being committed to results, they do a lot of homework before making a call, like pre-approach and gauging the environment, mood of the doctor, his likes and dislikes, inclination to the topic and so on.
  18. 18. 18 | MedicinMan June 2014 A Medical Rep carrying a big bag outside the doctor’s chamber is an unseemly sight. More than focusing on his job he is taking care of the bag. Sometimes the samples falls or the Visual Aid gets damaged while handling. It is too disorganized. The total impact is lost in this exercise. Can the concept be reinvented? What if you come across a Medical Rep who is carrying a small box that appears to be a‘gift’but is actually a complete detailing aid? This concept is called Visual Card. A‘concept’visual card is of the size of a visiting card or slightly larger. It can be designed in a way that on one side it mentions the brand name and its key promotional aspects (indications and benefits). On the same side can be an image of the product being detailed and the theme associ- ated with it. The same side can state the dosage forms. One important aspect that will make this card a success is to put some graphic image that grabs the attention of the doctor straight away. This should be in direct sync with the product name or the concept for which the product is introduced. The box itself can be designed aesthetically with color-cod- ing to look like a modern gizmo. The other side of the card can carry a short description of its mechanism of action and side effects; next to it can be an embedded microchip. When the doctor asks for de- Mayank Bedi E VISUALCARD:AN ALTERNATIVETO VISUALAID?A digital card with product information can add a new dimension to in-clinic interaction. Mayank Bedi studies at the Narsee Monjee Institute for Management Studies and is an intern at Allergan. A ‘concept’ visual card is of the size of a visiting card or slightly larger. When the doctor asks for detailed studies, the microchip can be registered with doctor’s fingerprint. Whenever the doctor needs any details about the product, all he needs to do is to swipe a finger across the microchip. The microchip will flash the related details on the visual card itself. “ ”
  19. 19. 19 | MedicinMan June 2014 tailed studies, the microchip can be registered with doctor’s fingerprint. Whenever the doctor needs any details about the product, all he needs to do is to swipe a finger across the microchip. The microchip will flash the related details on the visual card itself (or can be connected to nearest PC/Laptop/ Tablet). One product per visual card. For detailing more than one product, the Medical Rep has to carry a deck. The deck after detailing can be given to the doc- tor so that he can use it for future reference. So, a visual card can be handy for the Medical Rep to carry and detail, also the doctor does not need extra space to store and access it. In the same box, samples can be kept for ease of carrying, ease of access and portability for both the Medical Rep and the doctor. Last but the most important factor is that it will improve the image of the Medical Rep from a typical MR to an informed, tech-savvy healthcare professional. Most importantly, it can boost self-confidence and increase the enthusiasm towards work. A possible win-win situation? -MB “ ” Last but the most important factor is that the Visual Card will improve the image of the Medical Rep from a typical MR to an informed, tech-savvy healthcare professional. Mayank Bedi | Visual Card: An Alternative to Visual Aid?
  20. 20. 20 | MedicinMan June 2014 W ith fewer new products being introduced in the Indi- an Pharmaceutical Market (IPM), and shorter brand life cycles, pharma field force managers face pressure to improve the return on the current sales force investment. To cap it all, IPM is beleaguered with problems arising from price controls, the aggressive and volatile unions of pharma traders (PWA, RDCA, BCDA and their likes) and trade unions like FMRAI. High attrition rate, inability to attract and retain talent further compounds the problem. Senior pharma sales managers now face two difficult tasks. They have to make the right decisions and implement it effectively. Both have to be done quickly. The largest spend in pharma sales and marketing is usually on the sales force; in IPM usually 25-30% of the sales. Developing an effective sales force can enhance returns. Sales force effectiveness typically meant three things to an Indian pharmaceutical company: 1. Increasing the number of doctors in the list / changing the list. 2. Increasing the frequency of calls. 3. Enhancing the effectiveness of the messages delivered within the calls. Almost no Indian pharma company was looking at sales force effectiveness from the perspective of how the roles of people - Vivek Hattangadi E DRIVERSOFSALES FORCEEFFECTIVENESSA refresher on what Sales Force Effectiveness is and is not. Prof. Vivek Hattangadi is a Consultant in Pharma Brand Management and Sales Training at The Enablers. He is also visiting faculty at CIPM Calcutta (Vidyasagar University) for their MBA course in Pharmaceutical Management. vivekhattangadi@theenablers.org
  21. 21. 21 | MedicinMan June 2014 those who influence prescriptions - were changing, and how their individual needs were changing. Today that position has reversed. Sales Force Effectiveness means developing an outstanding sales force which can leverage the marketing tools to opti- mize productivity - through prescription generation. Some tools include the effective joint field work by managers, sales promotional material, cycle meetings and training programs and many more. A high quality sales force alone can assure high performance in today’s complex and highly competitive environment, and that too at lower costs. The power of the sales force continues to be and will remain a significant factor. An inefficient sales force can have a massive negative effect on its brands and incompetent sales teams can wreak havoc on market share. Sales force effectiveness and training are sometimes thought to be synonyms, but it is not so. Sales force effectiveness means to increase productivity, to cut expenditure and boost the morale of the field force. SFE is to ensure that every single minute a medical representative spends with the doctor is optimized. On the other hand, train- ing focuses on developing hard and soft skills, line manager coaching process and development. Training can be only one of the important elements of sales force effectiveness. Sales force effectiveness cannot be considered as training function alone. The most important driver of sales force effectiveness is the quality of leadership provided by the first-line managers. Others include customer knowledge, knowledge of competi- tion, skills and capabilities to succeed along with appropriate field activities, strategy execution management and commu- nication. Let us examine each of these drivers of SFE. Leadership skills: The strength of the first-line managers is the strength of the organization. Poor quality first-line managers stifle the success if an organization. First-line man- agers can provide strong leadership when they have vision and the conviction to make their vision a reality. A first-line manager can have his own vision statement which is aligned with that of his organization. Good leadership for sales force effectiveness requires excellent human qualities, which go far beyond conservative concepts of authority. Good leaders are an enabling force. Perhaps the concept of‘Servant Leadership’ advocated by Chanakya and modernized by Robert Greenleaf should be considered. Customer knowledge: It means understanding your pre- scribers inside out, so that you can manage and nurture them and get the best output. Many first-line managers do have knowledge of their prescribers/potential prescribers, fre- quently this is in a fragmented form and difficult to share or “ ” Sales Force Effectiveness means developing an outstanding sales force which can leverage the marketing tools to optimize productivity - through prescription generation. Vivek Hattangadi | Drivers of Sales Force Excellence
  22. 22. 22 | MedicinMan June 2014 analyze. Often it is incomplete. Customer knowledge includes collection of information and viewpoints that a first-line man- ager has about his doctors. The role of customer knowledge management is to capture and organize this data to allow it to be shared and discussed with the team. Customer knowl- edge also means the compilation of information to get the insight you need to build long-lasting relationships with the customers. Knowledge of competition: When interacting with my clients, I am surprised about how little they know about com- petition. They often lack understanding about their branding strategies and marketing tactics. Knowing who your compet- itors are, and what they are offering, can help you to make your products, services and marketing stand out. It will en- able you to do a SWOT Analysis of your competitors, and help you to respond to competitors marketing campaigns with your own initiatives. You can use this knowledge to create marketing strategies that take advantage of your competitors’ weaknesses, and improve your own business performance. You can also asses any threats posed by both new entrants to your market and current competitors. This knowledge will help you to be realistic about how successful you can be. Strategy execution management: Strategy execution is the buzz word in the management circles today. Strategy Execu- tion Management is the set of tools and processes to translate the organization’s strategy and business plan into reality. It is not just accomplishing a task or a goal, but also achieving the underlying business objectives. A good execution manage- ment will focus on WHAT as well as HOW of an achievement. If an organization has to deliver superior performance, without doubt, the people accountable for strategy execution – the first-line managers hold the key. A good first-line manager knows the strategies of the organization by heart and then ensures that his team has understood it well so that they execute them effectively. Communication: Getting your message across in a way that is clear and coherent to everyone that is listening is a critical skill for the first-line manager in developing sales force effec- tiveness. Effective sales force communication helps to bring about a high performing field sales force. However, the field force spends a lot of time on unnecessary or redundant com- munication. This wasted time affects sales force effectiveness and undermines the company performance. Communication is a skill area which a first-line manager needs to master to enhance sales force effectiveness. Conclusion: An effective sales force can make all the differ- ence, turning an average performing company into a leader in the IPM. Isn’t it time you put in your efforts to improve the effectiveness of your team? -VH “ ” Getting your message across in a way that is clear and coherent to everyone that is listening is a critical skill for the first-line manager in developing sales force effectiveness. Vivek Hattangadi | Drivers of Sales Force Excellence
  23. 23. 23 | MedicinMan June 2014 Globally, the Indian pharmaceutical industry ranks 3rd in terms of volume and 14th in terms of value. In 2011 Indian OTC market was estimated at $ 1.7 billion with an annual growth rate of 23%. Currently, India ranks 11th in terms of the OTC market size globally which is forecasted to be close to $ 6.5 billion by 2016. Growth drivers of OTC Market in India: 1. RISING AWARENESS ABOUT PREVENTIVE CARE has driven the growth of various categories like nutraceuticals, vitamins and dietary supplements. People now feel and know that prevention in long term not only saves the over- all healthcare cost but also keeps them healthy on a day to day basis. 2. SELF MEDICATION TENDENCY: Due to: • Higher education levels • Lack of time for small ailments in today’s stressful life- style. • Cost saving on consulting fees which they have to pay to doctors 3. LIFESTYLE FACTORS: With busy lifestyles, people are looking for quick and easy solutions to their problems. Some products which have made use of this need of con- sumers are Amrutanjan , Digene Fast Melt, Vicks Vapocool signifying quickness of their products. Changing lifestyle habits boosted the growth of gastrointestinal OTC products by 8% in 2013. (Nicholas hall) 4. PRODUCT INNOVATION Introduction of smaller packs (a concept of FMCG industry) has also driven the access of products in terms of: • Being economical and affordable to masses • Convenience in carrying. Ex; Amrutanjan balm comes in a 5g pack which is convenient to carry for consumers. Kumud Kandpal E OTCMARKETININDIA: SOMEGROWTHDRIVERSSocio-economic changes that are driving the growth of the OTC market in India. Kumud Kandpal is a Management Associate- International Marketing at Bioplus Life Sciences.
  24. 24. 24 | MedicinMan June 2014 5. PROMOTION Use of Mass Media: • Heavy promotion and marketing campaigns through TV, Print and digital promotion led to increase in the demand for these products. Endorsements by Celebrities: • Mary Kom for Polycrol Gel, Sonali Bendre for Volini, Sal- man Khan for Revital. Using Mary Kom strengthened the position of Polycrol gel in East India to No.1 position 6. CHANNELS DEVELOPMENT Availability of products in hypermarkets, grocery stores and healthcare specialist retailers led to increase in sales as it in- creases convenience for consumers to shop for such products while making their day to day shopping. 7. RURAL PENETRATION : Rural penetration initiative by many companies like Ranbaxy, Mankind, Pfizer, Dabur India Ltd which has increased the accessibility of their brands in Tier 2 Tier 3 cities. Ex. Ranbaxy and Pfizer partnered with ITC to distribute their range of OTC products Revital, Pepfiz, Volini Chericof 8. PRODUCT INNOVATIONS: 1. ENO launched tablets with different flavors and packaging, whereas traditionally it has been only in powder formats. The entire antacids category is close to (US$125mn) in 2013 where ENO is around $ 40 million with 32% Market share. ENO also launched Refreshing liquid (ENO GEL). 2. Polycrol Extra Strong is packaged in a portable transparent bottle with an informative label that helps consumers under- stand how it works in the stomach. 9. EVOLUTION OF DIGITAL MEDIA: Ranbaxy has used extensively the use of digital media to pro- mote Revital, Volini and Pepfiz. The Pepfiz campaign was conducted via Facebook and asked participants questions about food of choice to be declared India’s Biggest Foodie. Revital facebook page alone has a liking by more than 3.5 lakh people, Amrutanjan roll on balm has more than 40,000 likes . This provides an active platform for the brands to engage and converge with the consumers. -KK “ ” With busy lifestyles, people are looking for quick and easy solutions to their problems. Some products which have made use of this need of consumers are Amrutanjan , Digene Fast Melt, Vicks Vapocool signifying quickness of their products. Changing lifestyle habits boosted the growth of gastrointestinal OTC products by 8% in 2013. Kumud Kandpal | OTC Market in India: Some Growth Drivers
  25. 25. 25 | MedicinMan June 2014 L esson 1 - Endorsements and word of mouth are the most effective marketing tools. People endorse a product only when they have trust and their expectations are fully met. (Many KOLs like Ratan Tata and Ram Jethmalani named Modi for PM) Lesson 2 - Marketing must be a regular prac- tice and promotions should never stop. Thanks to the successful viral campaign, a hope was created in the minds of the citizens that NaMo is the only solution to all the problems of India. As soon as he was nominated as the PM candi- date, he started a series of huge, well planned rallies. Very few rallies were planned in the regions where his party had a strong presence. The focus was on the biggest states, places where his hold was weak and places where the competitors were losing faith of customers. The best part of rallies were customized take home messages for the audience - good governance; minimum government, maximum governance; nation first; and many more. Lesson 3 - Prioritize and execute the high impact plans more than others to maximize returns. Lesson 4 - Nothing is better than personally meeting customers and demonstrating the product. Lesson 5 - Always end your call with a memo- rable statement that summarizes the call. Once he started using these statements, every- one in his party used the same message. Lesson 6 – Launching a campaign without having insights about the customer is like open- ing an umbrella and praying for rain. Lesson 7 – Ab ki baar -- one big idea! If you get that... you have cracked the campaign right! Lesson 8 - There is no final marketing plan, the plan has to dynamic and responsive to the market changes Lesson 9 - If you are not using the technology, you are missing the bus. Lesson 10 - Always keep your best for the last. By turning the taunt into a slogan and playing the underdog, (Chaiwallah) he created a lasting emotional bond with voters. -KK Kailash Khatod E 10 lessons learnt by a Product Manager (PM) from the Prime Minister (PM) of India. Chai Pe Charcha Read the complete article at the Author’s blog here. Kailash Khatod is a young pharma professional, an avid blogger and social media enthusiast. Follow him on Twitter: @kailashkhatod
  26. 26. A new book by Renie McClay published by ASTD Press is apt for the global executive with a local vision. “The Art of Modern SalesManagement”has12chapters,each writtenbyaleaderinthefieldfromaround theworld. Renie McClay, MA, CPLP, has been a dynamic performance improvement professional for 20 years. She has been successful in sales, management, and learning and performance roles at several Fortune 500 companies (Kraft, Pactiv, and Novartis). Founder of Inspired Learning LLC, she continues to bring her passion and practical approach to all project work. Inspired Learning LLC does design and delivery of energetic programs and projects around the world. Now available for readers in India on Kindle and print on Amazon. Download a free chapter of the book here. The Art of Modern Sales Management is a must read for any global sales leader. It's practical, relevant, and grounded in the experience of seasoned sales professionals who make a significant difference in the organizations that they serve. This book includes many useful tips and actionable ideas that any sales leader can use. --Kimo Kippen, Chief Learning Officer, Hilton Worldwide Renie has done a great job of selecting thought leaders that speak to the challenges of selling in our new, connected world. I absolutely love the framework of the book and found myself skipping from one chapter to another based on what I thought was most relevant to the problems I am most interested in solving today. This book is a must for anyone that understands that front-sales management is tomorrow’s competitive advantage. --Pat Martin, VP of Sales, Estes Express Renie is on top of her game again and brings the A Team to the world of Modern Sales Management. With the explosion of social media and the immediacy of shared experience for buyers and sellers, The Art of Modern Sales Management is a practical guide to navigating these changing realities, and the action plans offered provide tools to ensure the best opportunity for success. If you have a leadership role within the sales organization, you need this book as a guide and resource. --Gary Summy, Director of Business Development Global Accounts Operations, Xerox Corporation
  27. 27. `` Varsha Phirke is studying M.Pharm (Pharmaceutics) and is preparing for a career in the Pharma sector along with practicing her skills as an artist. ~ Artwork by M.Pharm student Varsha Phirke ~ E

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