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Intro to User Journey Maps for Building Better Websites - WordCamp Minneapolis 2017 - anthonydpaul

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You’ve asked the right questions and maybe you have some personas. There’s a heap of feature requests from your client and a whole lot of content to organize into a sitemap (IA) document and wireframes. However, something’s not sitting right and you wonder how your WordPress site fits into the bigger customer journey with the client’s brand, business, and products. In this session, we’ll learn how to get started with taking all of that subject matter expertise you’ve been collecting in your mind, and to convert it into one of several useful types of journey maps. You’ll gain techniques and approaches for summoning ideas from many decision-makers and learn how these tools can fit into your greater web project.

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Intro to User Journey Maps for Building Better Websites - WordCamp Minneapolis 2017 - anthonydpaul

  1. 1. Intro to User Journey Maps for Building Better Websites WordCamp Minneapolis 2017 • #wcmsp • @anthonydpaul
  2. 2. Which design is better? Which is higher quality? Which cost more?
  3. 3. Both are inappropriate in context (props to Jeff Patton for the cake metaphor)
  4. 4. Websites work the same. Who is it for? Where are they using it? How does it fit into their life?
  5. 5. All of this affects the type of cake website we make.
  6. 6. website
  7. 7. journey website
  8. 8. journey website
  9. 9. journey website People are complex Thoughts and decisions Tasks to perform Discovery and advancement Motivations and anxieties
  10. 10. Where do I start?
  11. 11. Anthony D Paul Futurist, Researcher, and Usability Flag-Waver @anthonydpaul
  12. 12. Don’t assume you need this
  13. 13. Do as little as possible. Identify blind spots. Say what you might know. Use other smart people.
  14. 14. Documentation is disposable. Document to ask and answer questions—to gain shared understanding.
  15. 15. 1. Who Audience groups 2. Why Motivations, anxieties, influencers 3. What / How Decisions, tasks 4. When / Where Devices, scenarios, entrances, exits Use any fidelity to ask questions and provide answers
  16. 16. Sources for Audience Information
  17. 17. Interviews with clients and subject matter experts (SMEs) Pros: Usually easy to access Cons: Can introduce stereotypes Can pit internal politics (ranking opinions)
  18. 18. Interviews with customers (users) Pros: Best source of qualitative stories Cons: Needs a diverse sampling Can be a headache to get access and organize
  19. 19. “contextual inquiry”
  20. 20. group audience definition
  21. 21. group task definition
  22. 22. group task definition
  23. 23. group task prioritization
  24. 24. group journey map
  25. 25. group journey map
  26. 26. Usability tests with customers (users) Pros: Best source of qualitative stories Shortcut to recommendations Cons: Needs a diverse sampling Can be a headache to get access and organize http://wordpress.tv/2016/08/14/anthony-d-paul-organizing-your-first-website-usability-test-2/
  27. 27. Usability test today’s site
  28. 28. raw findings
  29. 29. anecdotal but qualitative
  30. 30. quantified
  31. 31. Survey data Pros: Great quantitative content Cons: Needs a diverse sampling Needs to be analyzed
  32. 32. Market reports Pros: Often does the work for you Cons: Level of specificity is hit and miss May or may not map to your segments Google > filetype:pdf
  33. 33. Google > filetype:pdf
  34. 34. Web analytics Pros: Easy to access (if it exists) Cons: Ambiguous, lacks context Need to be analyzed
  35. 35. Google Analytics > Audience > User Explorer
  36. 36. Google Analytics > User Explorer
  37. 37. For best results, a blend of info sources
  38. 38. Example Documents
  39. 39. 1. Who Audience groups 2. Why Motivations, anxieties, influencers 3. What / How Decisions, tasks 4. When / Where Devices, scenarios, entrances, exits Define and prioritize
  40. 40. Audience types
  41. 41. 1. Who Audience groups 2. Why Motivations, anxieties, influencers 3. What / How Decisions, tasks 4. When / Where Devices, scenarios, entrances, exits
  42. 42. Audience types (with motivations, anxieties, influencers)
  43. 43. Individual persona
  44. 44. 1. Who Audience groups 2. Why Motivations, anxieties, influencers 3. What / How Decisions, tasks 4. When / Where Devices, scenarios, entrances, exits Determine order, optional, and required
  45. 45. User scenario
  46. 46. Decision phases
  47. 47. Decision flow with UI conversations
  48. 48. Google Analytics > User Explorer
  49. 49. Session flow map
  50. 50. storyboard
  51. 51. 1. Who Audience groups 2. Why Motivations, anxieties, influencers 3. What / How Decisions, tasks 4. When / Where Devices, scenarios, entrances, exits
  52. 52. High-level ecosystem flow (email, 3rd-party systems)
  53. 53. Detailed ecosystem flow (login validation)
  54. 54. Example Project
  55. 55. Summer Camp Website
  56. 56. Define and prioritize groups • Parents • School groups and educators • New camp counselors • Sponsors/Donors/Partners • Extra credit = Content administrators
  57. 57. Take one group and document “why” New Camp Parents • Want child to learn during summer (motivation) • Heard about camp from a friend (entrance) • Find site via Google (entrance) • May have a budget (anxiety)
  58. 58. Document decisions New Camp Parents • How is this camp different? • Are we eligible? Can we afford it? • Is there availability? How do I sign up? • Are there mobile driving directions?
  59. 59. Convert decisions into task flows Is there availability? How do I sign up? • Access seasonal calendar • Filter by topic or grade level (e.g.) • [See available] • Use sign-up button
  60. 60. Single user and scenario journey map
  61. 61. Homework Assignment See Eric Meyer’s WC Northeast Ohio 2016 Keynote http://wordpress.tv/2016/06/24/eric-a-meyer-design-for-real-life/
  62. 62. Our instinct is to imagine someone like ourselves. So many of our users are nothing like us in any way.” “
  63. 63. Journeys help us understand real-world “stress cases.” Journeys define who we care about.
  64. 64. Think of journeys for users who • Have accessibility issues • Are sad • Are in a life crisis • Are hurried
  65. 65. journey website
  66. 66. SlideShare http://www.slideshare.net/anthonydpaul WordPress.tv http://wordpress.tv/speakers/anthony-d-paul/ (my talks and blog) http://adp.rocks or http:// .ws or http:// .ws Thank you @anthonydpaul

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