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Designing for Stress Cases - Baltimore Design Week 2016 - Kelly Driver and AnthonyDPaul

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Understanding the Everyday Relationship Between UX and Accessibility

The world we design for is increasingly complex and diverse, demanding considerations for user accessibility and real-world contexts. We often project the user as a mirror image of ourselves, making the mistake of imagining the best-case scenario—that users are calm, happy, and want to use the product. But this assumption is often false. In this talk, designers Anthony D Paul and Kelly Driver from idfive look at the role of stress cases, or common pain points, in user experience design, and share methods of building empathy between creatives and decision-makers in order to elevate product experiences for all.

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Designing for Stress Cases - Baltimore Design Week 2016 - Kelly Driver and AnthonyDPaul

  1. 1. @anthonydpaul + @kdriver4 #bmoreDW16
  2. 2. How People Do Things The Gulf of Execution & Evaluation
  3. 3. Don Norman, The Design of Everyday Things
  4. 4. What happens when we fail?
  5. 5. How Bad UX Killed Jenny Jonathan Shariat https://medium.com/@designuxui
  6. 6. What if circumstances are not ideal?
  7. 7. By identifying stress cases and designing with compassion in mind, you’ll create experiences that support more of your users, more of the time. Eric Meyer, WordCamp NEO Keynote https://is.gd/UIDQVf
  8. 8. What is accessibility? What inhibits access to our designs? Our information?
  9. 9. accessibility usability understandability
  10. 10. our design
  11. 11. our design physical or cognitive limitations person
  12. 12. our design physical or cognitive limitations social or cultural norms person influencers
  13. 13. our design physical or cognitive limitations social or cultural norms device or network limits person influencers
  14. 14. our design physical or cognitive limitations social or cultural norms journey or lifecycle device or network limits person influencers
  15. 15. our design physical or cognitive limitations social or cultural norms location, weather, climate journey or lifecycle device or network limits person influencers
  16. 16. our design physical or cognitive limitations social or cultural norms location, weather, climate specific situation or story journey or lifecycle device or network limits person influencers
  17. 17. Whoa, that’s a lot to think about. How do we get started?
  18. 18. Anthony D Paul Director of User Experience Kelly Driver Senior Interactive Designer
  19. 19. We’re probably familiar with personas.
  20. 20. Our instinct is to imagine someone like ourselves. But so many of our users are nothing like us in any way. Eric Meyer, WordCamp NEO Keynote https://is.gd/UIDQVf
  21. 21. We use design differently. We use it with a myriad of limitations —both permanent and temporary.
  22. 22. Stress Cases = Personas and stories, with fewer high-fives
  23. 23. There is no such thing as a normal human. Our capabilities are always changing. Xbox's August de los Reyes (Cliff Kuang) https://is.gd/SJ6C4K
  24. 24. Permanent vs. Transient (vs. Onset) User-Specific vs. Environmental attributes of stress cases
  25. 25. physical/cognitive non-transient Vision/Color Motor Hearing Learning/Memory PTSD/Trauma Headache (temporary) social/cultural semi-transient Peer pressure Taboo Color theory Politeness theory Iconography (e.g. Gerber) Education level Terminology/Slang Safety/Urgency lifecycle transient Tech affluency Brand familiarity Subject matter expertise Time of day Situational (flat tire) Part of task series Distractions (children)
  26. 26. environmental non-transient Workplace Home Lighting Internet quality Power Ambient temperature environmental transient Outdoors/Travel Sun Weather Physical jostling (subway) devices semi-transient Display size Input (touch/keyboard) Audio control Gesture control Internet quality Battery life
  27. 27. They’re usually in concert attributes of stress cases
  28. 28. Activity time!
  29. 29. introduction 1. Break into groups of 2–3 people 2. Grab at least one worksheet per group You've built a website for a college commencement. The website does typical graduation things, like help families get driving and parking directions, check schedules, look for tourism information, learn about the speaker, and more.
  30. 30. worksheet section A 1. Choose an audience type for each side 2. Assign each one or more tasks to perform in a single session 3. Define a stress case inherent to the user (e.g., physical/cognitive) 4. Define a stress case imposed by the situation/environment 10 minutes
  31. 31. worksheet section B Open a commencement site; for example: ➔ commencement.osu.edu ➔ commencement.umich.edu ➔ commencement.syr.edu ➔ commencement.utexas.edu ➔ commencement.wisc.edu
  32. 32. worksheet section B Who is it designed for? What tasks or content are most prominent? At first glance, is this website for your user?
  33. 33. worksheet section B Trade sheets with another team
  34. 34. 1. Capture difficulty notes 2. Repeat this exercise for both of your users 3. Optionally simulate inhibitor (dim screen, move device) You are no longer the designer. You are a user participating in a usability study, using this website in the real world, within the context that has been given to you. 10 minutes worksheet section B
  35. 35. ➔ Note they don’t have to be implemented. ➔ These are objective suggestions. ➔ Use the word “consider.” Put your designer and researcher hat back on. Suggest design revisions to remedy the difficulties you observed in usability testing. 5 minutes worksheet section C
  36. 36. Cheeky Now do this in real life.
  37. 37. set research goals Define all important audience groups ➔ Their respective tasks ➔ How needs change throughout their lifecycle Think about any limitations ➔ User abilities ➔ Environmental and situational hurdles
  38. 38. run multiple studies Across devices Field research, outside, in the weather With real people With multiple types of tests ➔ Interviews ➔ Betas ➔ Treejack surveys ➔ Usability tests
  39. 39. Build empathy among your team.
  40. 40. share audience definition Based on research findings Avoid demographics and stereotypes Focus on tasks
  41. 41. @alanklement http://is.gd/6RQRwO
  42. 42. Audience types
  43. 43. Audience types (with motivations, anxieties, influencers)
  44. 44. User scenario
  45. 45. Decision flow with UI conversations
  46. 46. Single user and scenario journey map
  47. 47. Multi-user journey map
  48. 48. Talk about accessibility. What inhibits access to our designs? Our information?
  49. 49. Disability is an engine of innovation. Xbox's August de los Reyes (Cliff Kuang) https://is.gd/SJ6C4K
  50. 50. Cliff Kuang https://is.gd/SJ6C4K 1808, Pellegrino Turri invents typewriter to help blind friend write legibly 1937, Joseph Friedman creates bendy straw for his young daughter 1973, Vint Cerf creates email to remotely communicate with deaf wife
  51. 51. By designing with the disabled in mind, we can create projects that are better for everyone else. Xbox's August de los Reyes (Cliff Kuang) https://is.gd/SJ6C4K
  52. 52. If you really want that thumbs up experience, your best bet is to design for stress cases.
  53. 53. speaking Responsive wireframing (2016) at edUi (Charlottesville, VA) Atomic brand libraries workshop (2017) at UXCamp DC and UXPA International (Toronto) organizing ➔ http://baltimore.wordcamp.org (Nov 19-20) ➔ http://wiaddc.org (Feb 18) Anthony D Paul http://adp.rocks http:// .ws http:// .ws @anthonydpaul Kelly Driver http://kellydriver.com @kdriver4

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