6.eric laws and noel scott

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6.eric laws and noel scott

  1. 1. Preserving intangible heritage and culture through tourism: a review of issues Professor Eric Laws James Cook University, Australia Assoc. Prof. Noel Scott School of Tourism, The University of Queensland
  2. 2. Tourism market is changing FROM Passive viewing • artefacts • cultural dances • events • visiting heritage sights TO Active involvement and interactive experiences • Active involvement, • Learning, • Aesthetic appreciation and meaning • Entertaining stories
  3. 3. Popping the ‘tourist bubble’ Engaging with culture-heritage resources rather than gazing at them from within a “tourist bubble
  4. 4. Intangible cultural heritage Intangible cultural heritage (ICH) offers a way of addressing • the stories, • cultural practices, • music, • food preparation methods • lives of ethnic groups Because it is active and can be used to encourage involvement, learning etc.
  5. 5. Tourism helps preserve intangible cultural heritage Tourism offers an opportunity to help preserve ICH resources by providing money and support to those communities and people who “own” and “maintain” ICH
  6. 6. Can we “commercialise” ICH while at the same time maintaining their authenticity and also benefiting local people. Tourist carrying capacity of the destination community. Resilience of the local community and its capacity to withstand the pressure of “alien” behaviour. Resilience of the local culture and its capacity to withstand the pressure of market-led promotion and demand for packaged and commoditized culture. Types of tourists. Adaptability of the visitors. Introduction of suitable management strategies, which may include spatial segregation into dedicated host and guest precincts, and strategies to distract visitors from communities, sites and settings that may be particularly vulnerable to any level of visitation.
  7. 7. Lessons from Leeds Castle, Kent and visitor management initiatives in Canterbury   • A shift from increasing demand to altering its character and managing its flow * Providing meaning and fulfilment rather than emphasising facilities and services * Shifting from standardised tourism to distinctive experiences * Respecting rather than exploiting the environment * Adaptation rather than general solutions * A long term view * An optimisation approach in place of maximisation. * Viewing employees as hosts rather than an hierarchical approach
  8. 8. Questions Eric Laws e.laws@runbox.com Noel Scott noel.scott@uq.edu.au

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