Successfully reported this slideshow.
Your SlideShare is downloading. ×

Week two of NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program

Week two of NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program

Download to read offline

This week we talked about outlining and checked in on our progress toward our NaNoWriMo goals.

This week we talked about outlining and checked in on our progress toward our NaNoWriMo goals.

More Related Content

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 30 day trial from Scribd

See all

Week two of NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program

  1. 1. NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program 2nd MEETING NOVEMBER 9, 2020
  2. 2. Congrats on completing 13% of our shared word count goals for our classroom!
  3. 3. Our progress so far! 122,100 16,849
  4. 4. Shoutouts to high achievers this week! 25% or more toward goal: Avishi, Layla, and Lexi! 10% or more toward goal: Thomas, Willow, and Delight!
  5. 5. The highest word count this week goes to Alana, with 3,186 words towards her 40,000 word goal! Talk about setting ambitious goals!
  6. 6. Just so you know, you DON’T have to write your novel in NaNoWriMo.org for me to give you credit. You do have to set up a “novel” and set a goal, and just record the number of words you’ve written. Try to update it every day so that you get credit for every day you wrote.
  7. 7. Use the Total Word Count box to update your total each day. If Lexi writes 500 words today, her total word count will be: 2504 + 500 = 3004 So she should write “3004” and it will update the graph.
  8. 8. For those of you who are writing your novels on the website, your word count updates automatically each time you write. Writing on NaNoWriMo.org also gives me a chance to read your writing, and give you compliments and encouragement!
  9. 9. More Shoutouts: Elijah, Layla, Delight, Thomas and Aidan started their books with scary, exciting openings that start right in the middle of action! Alana, Lexi, Sedonah, Willow and Avishi have openings that do a great job of showing us who their characters are, and what their narrative voice is like!
  10. 10. Now… let’s get to work!
  11. 11. Writers sometimes say you’re either an “outliner” or a “pantser”… But regardless of how you see yourself, here’s why it’s important to have at least a basic sketch of how your novel is going to go, including the climax and the ending: Because you can’t get writer’s block if you at least know where your story is going to end up! Outlines keep you moving forward!
  12. 12. Some stories, like “Boris the Unicorn” on your handout, start like this:
  13. 13. But as we saw last week, you could also write the story like this: “Boris, stop shaking. It’s going to be okay,” Juliet said. “When Ivan sees how good you are, he’ll HAVE to change the rules about letting unicorns into the circus!” “I don’t know… I’m scared,” said Boris, waiting for his turn to audition. “What if I get stage fright? What if I freeze?” “You can do this,” Juliet said. “You don’t want to just spend your life at home playing video games. You deserve to get out there and make something of yourself.” She was right. Only a few hours ago, Boris was eating his seventh slice of pizza and playing his fourth hour of Pac-Man, feeling like his life would never change…
  14. 14. Anyone want to share your beginning/ exciting incident?
  15. 15. The upward slope can be seen as like a measurement of how scary or exciting your plot is. The farther you go into your plot, the more scary/exciting/intriguing it should be. Going up the roller coaster doesn’t necessarily mean things are going well for your hero. Things might be going HORRIBLE.
  16. 16. During Rising Action: Conflict is intensifying. Problems are increasing. Solutions are looking more and more uncertain.
  17. 17. It’s also okay if your roller coaster looks like this: Problem… solved, for now… New problem I hadn’t expected… solved, for now… Worst problem EVER!! FINALLY solved all my problems… That was scary… But I’ve grown a lot, learned a lot, and things are better than they were when I started.
  18. 18. Anyone want to share what problems your hero will face during Rising Action?
  19. 19. You know how your stomach kind of sinks when you reach the top of the roller coaster, stop climbing, and start FALLING? You’ve come to a turning point, and things are going to start happening faster than ever. That’s what your climax should feel like.
  20. 20. Anyone want to share what event or crisis will be the turning point of your story?
  21. 21. There’s been a turning point, and things are moving quickly now. They’re either starting to get better, or just speeding to the conclusion. The hero is starting to get some idea of how to beat his or her problem, and gaining strength.
  22. 22. Anyone want to share how your hero will emerge out of that turning point and toward a good conclusion?
  23. 23. Anyone want to share how your novel is going to end?
  24. 24. Hans and Sophie are in jail, reflecting on their lives Interrogation begins Hans and Sophie answer questions while also reflecting on how they went from Hitler Youth to resistance leaders. We see that they didn’t always oppose Hitler. They were brainwashed at first, but learned the truth. We see Hans had a persecuted past that led to his radicalization. Other friends are brought for questioning. Hans and Sophie try denying everything for a while, but Gisela’s testimony makes that difficult. She’s a Nazi. Their accomplices are arrested and the evidence keeps mounting against them. Hans tries to save his sister and friends by confessing and taking all the blame. Sophie refuses to let Hans take all the blame. She’s had it with the Nazis and is willing to die doing what’s right. She tries to save her friends and exaggerates her role in it all. They are tried for treason and sentenced to death. They can’t save their friends, but they can at least finally reveal their disgust for Hitler and the Nazis. They say goodbye to their parents, their friends, and each other. They die with dignity and honor, as heroes and martyrs for freedom, human rights, and the Christian faith.
  25. 25. Questions about the Plot Rollercoaster?
  26. 26. Want to show us your Plot Rollercoaster?
  27. 27. Remember… YOU CAN DO THIS! Now let’s go write some books!
  28. 28. If you haven’t logged on yet, here’s how:
  29. 29. 1. ywp.nanowrimo.org 2. 3. 4.
  30. 30. 5. Create your account 6. Explore our group 7. Take the challenge

×