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Week one of NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program

Week one of NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program

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This year at my library we did a weekly program series to encourage kids to participate in and complete the NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program! In this presentation I showed for our first week of November, we discussed the importance of having a central conflict and characters with varying intentions and motivations.

This year at my library we did a weekly program series to encourage kids to participate in and complete the NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program! In this presentation I showed for our first week of November, we discussed the importance of having a central conflict and characters with varying intentions and motivations.

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Week one of NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program

  1. 1. NaNoWriMo Young Writers Program 1ST MEETING NOVEMBER 2, 2020
  2. 2. The #1 most important part of a novel is: A PROBLEM
  3. 3. Time for a Speed Write!! Finish writing about your major characters’ problems and motivations, and don’t stop moving your pencil until I say stop!
  4. 4. Time for a Speed Write!! Finish writing about your major characters’ problems and motivations, and don’t stop moving your pencil until I say stop!
  5. 5. Time for a Speed Write!! Finish writing about your major characters’ problems and motivations, and don’t stop moving your pencil until I say stop!
  6. 6. Stop! On to our next discussion: Writing the perfect first sentence!
  7. 7. Funny, scary, sad, realistic, magical… But let’s go DEEPER. Keep in mind that your first line is not necessarily defined by the genre of your book. Your adventure book might have a sad first line, or your horror book might have a funny opening. That’s why it’s important to think about WHY good openings work. HOW DO THEY HOOK YOU, AND PULL YOU IN?? It’s not about writing the right “kind” of opening. It’s about writing an opening that will get the reader’s attention.
  8. 8. So, feel free to skip the next couple pages of the workbook, and instead look here at some examples from real books with first lines that each have a special way of getting the reader’s attention:
  9. 9. There is also an element of irony or the unexpected, in both of these sad openings!
  10. 10. So what kind of opening do YOU want to write? Another tip to keep in mind is that your main character has to CHANGE in some way by the end of your book. Your opening can set the stage for that change by showing who he or she is at the start. (The “trusted friend” opening is a great way to do this.) Change provoked by conflict and cemented by action Point A (beginning) Point B (the end)
  11. 11. Need a helping hand? Try finishing one of these sentences (pgs. 88-89 of the workbook): There was a sound coming from the basement, and it sounded like… Rain always makes me think of the time that… The thing everyone should know about elves is… I didn’t go to school today. Instead…
  12. 12. Time for a Speed Write!! Here are those sentence starters again:
  13. 13. Time for a Speed Write!! Here are those sentence starters again:
  14. 14. Stop!
  15. 15. Want to share your opening? You can type it in the chat, or if you’d like to read it aloud to us, please use the “Raise Hand” button.
  16. 16. Are you ready to take the NaNoWriMo challenge?
  17. 17. How long will your novel be? Most children’s novels (written by adults) are between 40,000 and 69,000 words long. And they usually take years to write. But you’re kids, so… I recommend aiming for 10,000 words, especially since we’re starting one day late! Whatever your word count goal, make it something you know you could achieve if you try hard enough.
  18. 18. How many words will you need to write per day? If you choose the 10,000 word goal: 10,000__ = about 345 words per day 29
  19. 19. How much is 345 words? It’s just over half a page in 12 pt. font.
  20. 20. Too hard? How about 250 words? If you write 250 words a day for 29 days, your total output will be 7,250 words. That’s pretty good for your first novel!!
  21. 21. If you’re ready to take the plunge, log in to your account on ywp.nanowrimo.org and click “Yes, I accept!”
  22. 22. 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345 5:30 7:00 345
  23. 23. 9,000 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 10,000
  24. 24. YOU CAN DO THIS! Now let’s write some books!
  25. 25. If you haven’t logged on yet, here’s how:
  26. 26. 1. ywp.nanowrimo.org 2. 3. 4.
  27. 27. 5. Create your account 6. Explore our group 7. Take the challenge

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