Data for accountability

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Data for accountability

  1. 1. www.pbisassessment.org ww.swis.org www.pbiseval.org Sustaining Communities of PracticeSchoolwide positive behaviour support Queensland Conference 2011 Presented by Anne W. Todd University of Oregon awt@uoregon.edu
  2. 2.   Accountability  Progress Monitoring  Evaluation ◦  Measure fidelity of implementation ◦  Measure student outcomes
  3. 3. An ExampleElementary Playground Problems
  4. 4.   Total enrollment= 550   3 classes per grade level   18 classrooms (30/class)  Primary Problem Statement ◦  fighting and physical aggression on playground   550 students full playground area, expectations, equipment use  Precise Problem Statement ◦  High rates of physical aggression, disrespect and inappropriate language on the playground during second and third grade recess. Many students are involved and it appears they are trying to get access to equipment/games   180 2ne/3rd graders, routine for accessing/sharing equipment/games
  5. 5. 30 25hours 20 15 2 precison elements 4+ precision elements 10 5 0 Planning time Implementation time:staff Implementation time: students
  6. 6.   Two things to measure ◦  Did we do what we planned and did we do it well? ◦  Did it have a positive impact on student Behaviour? •  If using the same measurement tools, districts can compare the implementation status across schools
  7. 7. PBIS Assessment is a web-based application designed to assist in high-fidelity, sustained implementation of school-wide positive Behaviour support (SWPBS). The goal of the website is to improve the efficiency and accuracy with which tool/instrument can be used to complete three functions:A. Initial Assessment B. Implementation C. Sustained Assessmentof discipline practices to Assessment of the implementation ofdetermine if and how of the fidelity with which SWPBS at all three tiers toSWPBS should be adopted. SWPBS procedures are being facilitator on-going use of used, and the design of “action core SWPBS features. plans” to improve implementation fidelity.
  8. 8. 1. Improvement of the application structure: Research Only Assessment of Implementation2. Inclusion of Other Surveys & Instruments : Evidence & research based tools Research, Annual Assessments & Progress Monitoring
  9. 9. 3. Evaluation Template: PBIS Assessment will have the capacity to include an evaluation template for schools/districts in developing evaluation plans.4. Action Planning: PBIS Assessment will incorporate an Action Plan that will combine information from all the surveys a school enters into PBIS Assessment. The data entered will be used to create one Action Plan that schools can use for Annual Action Planning.
  10. 10. The following will ALL transfer from PBIS Surveys to PBIS Assessment: Login Information Survey Data Open Survey Windows All Previous Data
  11. 11. Annual Progress Research Tools Assessment Monitoring Tool ToolUniversal System SET BoQ 2.0 TIC 3.0 (Tier 1) *PreSET SAS *PIC Secondary & SAS *MATTTertiary Systems *ISSET *BAT *PIC (Tier 2 & 3) Outcome Tool/instrument: School Safety Survey * Tool to be included in future version
  12. 12. Team Initiated ReviewProblem Solving Status and(TIPS) Model Identify Problems Evaluate and Develop and Revise Refine Action Plan Hypotheses Develop and Discuss and Implement Select Action Plan Solutions Problem Solving Foundations
  13. 13.   The School-wide Evaluation Tool (SET), an interview and observation protocol through which an external expert can evaluate the status of critical PBIS features both before and after implementation, data entry is available for coordinators only.   The SET is a research instrument for determining the extent to which a school is implementing school-wide positive Behaviour support.  The SET results provide a summary score that is used (a) to determine annual goals for school-wide effective Behaviour support, (b) to evaluate on- going efforts toward school-wide Behaviour support, (c) to design and revise procedures as needed, and (d) to compare annual accomplishments toward school-wide effective Behaviour support. Feature Areas of SET Data Sources a)  expectations defined, Permanent Products b)  Behavioural expectations taught, (e.g. discipline handbook, school improvement c)  acknowledgement procedures, plan for safety related goal, instructional materials, d)  correction procedures, meeting minutes) e)  monitoring and evaluation, Observations f)  management, and Staff Interviews g)  district level support. Student Interviews
  14. 14.   The BoQ is an expedient, effective assessment tool that measures the degree to which a school is implementing the universal level of school-wide positive Behaviour support (SWPBS). Data entry is available for coordinators only.   The process typically includes the following:   The coach (facilitator) first completes the Coach Scoring Form using the Scoring Guide that provides operational definitions of the scores for each item.   The team members then individually complete the Team Member Rating Form, a simplified version of the Coach’s Scoring Form that does not require the Scoring Guide.   The BoQ has a total possible score of 100. This score is derived from the 3-8 items in each of the 10 subscales. Each item has a maximum value between one and three points, and points for the items are summed to obtain a Total Score.
  15. 15.   The Team Checklist is used to guide PBIS implementation team activities throughout the year.  The checklist is used as a status report quarterly or monthly. Teams can use the results of the checklist to complete or revise an action plan for the year.
  16. 16.   The School Safety Survey is designed to assess risk factors and response plans for school safety and violence.  The Safety Survey is completed annually by a minimum of five school staff, including the custodian.  This information is useful in determining training and support needs related to school safety and violence prevention.
  17. 17.   The Self-Assessment Survey is used by school staff to evaluate the implementation of PBIS systems.  The survey examines the current status and need for improvement of four Behaviour support systems: a)  school-wide discipline systems, b)  non-classroom management systems (e.g., cafeteria, hallway, playground), c)  classroom management systems, and d)  systems for individual students engaging in chronic problem Behaviours.  The Self-Assessment Survey is typically completed when a school first begins adoption of School-wide Behaviour Support systems, and then annually (preferably in the Spring) thereafter as part of the team’s action planning process.
  18. 18.   School-wide •  Classroom  Non-classroom •  Individual
  19. 19.   Expectations defined (question 1) Expectations taught (2) Reward system (3) Violations system (4-8) Monitoring (10-12) Management (9, 14-16) District support (17-18)
  20. 20.   Reliable& evidence-based  Consistent across states  Meets need(s) not duplicated by tool/ instrument currently in user.
  21. 21. PBIS Assessment Go To Webinars: Date Time July 6 8:00 AM PST July 14 8:00 AM PST July 20 1:00 PM PST July 28 1:00 PM PST August 3 8:00 AM PST August 11 8:00 AM PST August 17 1:00 PM PST August 25 1:00 PM PST Register at www.pbisassessment.org
  22. 22.   www.swis.org ◦  Annual License   SWIS - $250 US/year   CICO-SWIS -$50 US/year   ISIS-SWIS - $150 US/year Web-based application for entering problem Behaviour incidents and for generating reports for problem solving and decision-making
  23. 23. Total Office Discipline Referrals as of January 10Total Office Discipline Referrals Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual. 45
  24. 24. Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving(TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual. 46
  25. 25. Grade Range Number of Mean Enrollment Median ODRs Schools per school per 100 per school dayK-6 2565 452 .226-9 713 648 .509-12 266 897 .68K-(8-12) 474 423 .42Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated ProblemSolving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training 47manual.
  26. 26. Elementary School with 150 StudentsCompare with National Median150 / 100 = 1.50 1.50 X .22 = .33Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated ProblemSolving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished 48training manual.
  27. 27. 50
  28. 28. Using office discipline 6+ office discipline referralsreferrals as a metric for ~5%universal screening of 2-5 office discipline ~15% referralsstudent social Behaviour 0-1 office discipline referral ~80% of Students Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual. 51
  29. 29. Jennifer Frank, Kent McIntosh, 12 Seth May 10 Cumulative Mean ODRs Per MonthCumulative Mean ODRs for 325+ Elementary Schools 08-09 8 6 0-1 2-5 6+ 4 2 0 Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun
  30. 30. 20 Avg. ODRs Per School Day 15 10 5 0 Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan School Months School Avg. National Avg. = 3.9Newton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated ProblemSolving (TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublishedtraining manual. 53
  31. 31. Trevor Test Middle School 11/01/2007 through 01/31/2008 (last 3 mos.) 54
  32. 32. 1.  Most Disruptions occur in Cafeteria 2.  Most Disruptions occur in Cafeteria between 11:30 AM and 12:00 PM 3.  Most instances Inappropriate Language occur in Cafeteria between 11:30 AM and 12:00 AM Now…use a Custom Graph to confirm (or disconfirm) your inferences, starting with Disruptions, by grade levelNewton, J. S., Todd, A. W., Algozzine, K., Horner, R. H., & Algozzine, B. (2009). The Team Initiated Problem Solving(TIPS) Training Manual. Educational and Community Supports, University of Oregon, unpublished training manual. 55
  33. 33.   www.pbiseval.org  Annual License ◦  State - $1000 US/year ◦  Region/District - $500 US/year Aggregates PBIS Assessment Data and SWIS data by School, by Cohort (self defined), by District, by State
  34. 34.   Start with decision to be made  Provide support for getting accurate data  Integrate data sources  Share the data ----- regularly ◦  Include critical teams/ people for problem solving  Make decisions based on the data ◦  Go for the small stuff  Celebrate successes!
  35. 35. Team Initiated ReviewProblem Solving Status and(TIPS) Model Identify Problems Evaluate and Develop and Revise Refine Action Plan Hypotheses Develop and Discuss and Implement Select Action Plan Solutions Problem Solving Foundations

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