COSC 111 Sp 2012 (B)

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  • Example: Someone studying technology and educationWhat population? (k12, college)Specific tasks/venues: Classroom or assignment use?What subject matter? (ex: biology or history?)What specific technology? (Blackboard, wiki, web site, videoconferencing, IM, online databases, what?)Who is using/”making” that technology? (Student or teacher?)What country? (one or comparing countries)What time period? ( and change over time)
  • Applications of information technology within a specific field – this can still be a huge topic that can benefit from some whittling down. Otherwise you can have too many sources to wade through, and too much trouble focusing your final product.Some ways to think about it:What are some examples of kinds of technologies you might want to pursue? (mobile communications, social media, software, robotics, etc.).Technologies are tools. They ideally should be used to achieve specific goals. For instance, certain technologies might encourage certain kinds of learning by college students. So one way to approach this would be to think of the goals that are important and then find out which technologies are being used to achieve them.Or, in some (many!) cases, technologies applied in certain ways might cause problems; then other technologies might be used to solve those problems. Computer hacking vs. computer security is one obvious example, but there are others!!Since your professor’s expertise is in INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY, you might want to focus on this kind of tech. “as defined by the Information Technology Association of America (ITAA), is ‘the study, design, development, implementation, support or management of computer-based information systems, particularly software applications and computer hardware.’” – Wikipedia
  • We can’t search the innards of a book when we use the Towson Catalog to find books. Think of a book that is likely to talk about your subject.Examples: maybe you won’t find a book on the subject of motion detectors in the home. But you might find one on security systems for the home.Maybe you won’t find a book on Blackboard per se. But there might be a book that discusses online education that has a chapter on different systems like Blackboard or even Blackboard specifically.When we search for articles using databases, you can search for much more specific topics. Articles because of their length are more specific & also we can search the entire text of articles most of the time to find that needle in the haystack.
  • We can’t search the innards of a book when we use the Towson Catalog to find books. Think of a book that is likely to talk about your subject.Examples: maybe you won’t find a book on the subject of motion detectors in the home. But you might find one on security systems for the home.Maybe you won’t find a book on Blackboard per se. But there might be a book that discusses online education that has a chapter on different systems like Blackboard or even Blackboard specifically.When we search for articles using databases, you can search for much more specific topics. Articles because of their length are more specific & also we can search the entire text of articles most of the time to find that needle in the haystack.
  • Databases are more efficient!Search Academic Search Premier - facebook AND privacy Note difference between magazine and peer reviewed
  • http://bit.ly/cosc111sp12bhttp://bit.ly/cosc111sp12c
  • COSC 111 Sp 2012 (B)

    1. 1. COSC 111: Finding InformationUsing Cook Library LAKSAMEE PUTNAM LPUTNAM@TOWSON.EDU RESEARCH AND INSTRUCTION LIBRARIAN
    2. 2. First… Laksamee Putnam lputnam@towson.edu Cook Library Reference:  410.704.2462.  IM/email Phone: 410.704.3746. Twitter: @CookLibraryofTU Albert S. Cook facebook profile!
    3. 3. On the side … Library Book Sale  April 1st – April 6th Mark Bowden talk  Author of “Black Hawk Down”  April 11th, 6-7:30PM, West Village Commons 404 “The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks”  Book Club  April 19th, 12:30-1:30, Cook 507
    4. 4. Take Away… Evaluate Resources Search strategies and Search tips Finding books: Cook Library Catalog Finding articles: Databases http://www.ted.com/talks/eli_pariser_beware_online_filter_bubbles.html
    5. 5. Evaluate Check for CRAP  Examples Currency  http://bit.ly/cosmicweb1 Reliability  http://bit.ly/cosmicweb2 Authority http://bit.ly/cosmicweb3 Purpose/Point of View 
    6. 6. Check for CRAP  Currency  How recent is the information?  Can you locate a date when the resource was written/created/updated?  Based on your topic, is this current enough?  Why might the date matter for your topic? http://www.flickr.com/photos/helloeveryone123/393737419 3/sizes/m/in/photostream/Guidelines for CRAP provided by the Jean and Alexander Heard Library
    7. 7. Check for CRAP  Reliability  What kind of information is included in the resource?  Does the author provide citations & references for quotations & data  Where are you accessing this information? http://www.flickr.com/photos/schnappi/5930145952/sizes/l/in/photostream/Guidelines for CRAP provided by the Jean and Alexander Heard Library
    8. 8. Check for CRAP  Authority  Can you determine who the author/creator is?  What are their credentials (education, affiliation, exp erience, etc.)?  Who is the publisher or sponsor of the work/site?  Is this publisher/sponsor reputable http://rantchick.com/a-doctrine-on-respect/Guidelines for CRAP provided by the Jean and Alexander Heard Library
    9. 9. Check for CRAP  Purpose/Point of View  Is the content primarily opinion?  Is the information balanced or biased?  What is the purpose of the information? Is it to inform, teach, sell, enterta in or persuade http://www.flickr.com/photos/cogdog/5484085301/sizes/m /in/photostream/Guidelines for CRAP provided by the Jean and Alexander Heard Library
    10. 10. Preparing to Search Articulate your topic Brainstorm Strategize where to search
    11. 11. research skills ≠ needle in the haystack
    12. 12. Technology Brainstorming What kinds of (information) technologies? Technologies used to achieve specific goals  Encourage communication or learning, etc. Targeted towards certain populations  Business or college students, etc.
    13. 13. Search Terms and Keyword Reminders Keywords come from the search question Use Boolean “search connectors” to combine keywords in ways that capture the results you need Use broader terms/concepts when looking for BOOKS. Use narrower terms when looking for ARTICLES.
    14. 14. Formulating a Keyword Search1. Choose a Topic
    15. 15. Formulating a Keyword Search1. Choose a Topic  The success of Apple products
    16. 16. Formulating a Keyword Search2. Narrow/Broaden your search
    17. 17. Formulating a Keyword Search2. Narrow/Broaden your search  How Apple created and marketed its products successfully
    18. 18. Formulating a Keyword Search3. Identify the key concepts
    19. 19. Formulating a Keyword Search3. Identify the key concepts  Apple  Marketing  Created  Products  Success
    20. 20. Formulating a Keyword Search4. Consider synonyms/alternative spellings for terms  Apple  Products  Marketing  Success  Created
    21. 21. Formulating a Keyword Search4. Consider synonyms/alternative spellings for terms  Apple  Products  Apple Inc.  Brand  Mac  Invention  Marketing  Iphone  Market  Advertise  Success  Retail  Achievement  Created  Fortune  Innovate  Fame  Design  Progress  Build
    22. 22. Similar ideas….different words Cellphone Cell phone Cellular telephone Wireless phone Mobile Smartphone
    23. 23. Formulating a Keyword Search5. Formulate your search utilizing various combinations of your words  String them together using AND/OR/NOT  Truncate *  Phrase Searching
    24. 24. Formulating a Keyword Search6. Limit your search  Appropriate date range  Subject  Publication type
    25. 25. Good searching starts with good keywords Boolean “search connectors” AND OR NOTFor example:spam AND internet security • Combining >1 topicOLED OR organic light emitting diodes • Combining synonymous terms
    26. 26. What AND does…spam AND internet security
    27. 27. What OR does… organic light OLED emitting diodesOLED OR organic light emitting diodes
    28. 28. Don’t forget: Truncation helpstechnolog* finds… technolog y technolog ies technolog ists technolog ical technolog ically …etc!
    29. 29. Phrase Searching Use quotations to keep a keyword phrase intact (words will be searched in the specific order)  Examples:  “Bank of America”  “Cisco Systems”
    30. 30. Putting it all together… How Apple created and marketed its products successfully? Apple Market* Success “Apple Inc.” advertise innovate Mac retail progress Apple OR “Apple Inc.” OR Mac AND market* OR advertise OR retail AND success OR innovate OR progress
    31. 31. Search Terms and Keyword Reminders Keywords come from the search question Use Boolean “search connectors” to combine keywords in ways that capture the results you need Use broader terms/concepts when looking for BOOKS. Use narrower terms when looking for ARTICLES.
    32. 32. Finding Books Towson Catalog  Collection and Call Number USMAI Combined Catalog  Requests TU WorldCat Interlibrary Loan (Illiad)
    33. 33.  From:  Scholarly JournalsSearching  Magazines (inc. Trade Publications)Databases  NewspapersCook Library  Peer-reviewed articles in multipleSubject Gateways journals  JournalsComputer Science  Towson: 64 journals with the words “Computer Science” in the title  Databases  Computer Science Index: 500 journals on a variety of topics
    34. 34. Let’s start searching! Come up with keywords for your topic Find a website – Check for CRAP Find a book – Check for CRAP Find an article – Check for CRAP As you are finding information on your topic please fill in the Google Doc worksheet  http://bit.ly/cosc111sp12b
    35. 35. Questions? Feel free to contact me:  Laksamee Putnam  lputnam@towson.edu  410.704.3746.  Twitter: @LibrarianLaks Or any reference librarian:  Visit Cook Library Reference Desk  410.704.2462.  IM – tucookchat

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