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Digital Citizenship    just the basics       Anne Collier          Co-Director      ConnectSafely.org      Executive Direc...
Six elements         of digital citizenship•   Access•   Participation or “civic engagement”•   Literacies: tech, media, s...
The most basic definition       “The central task of           citizenship        is learning how  to be good to one anoth...
Expanded definition (draft)Citizenship: the rights & responsibilities of full, positive   engagement in a participatory wo...
Digital citizenship tends to unfold… 5th grade teacher writes about her students’ ‘Digital Citizenship Minute’
Get the ‘pool’ into school!
The pillars of                          citizenship                           learning                         • Infrastru...
Digital learning’s     progression1. Classroom engagement2. Civic engagement (participation)3. Civic efficacy
Students’ definitions…Developing and determining the best…•Means of communication & self-expression•Strategies for maintai...
Our Space:Being a Responsible Citizen of the Digital World (great free curriculum from USC and Harvard)
What’s in it for students?• Safety and support• Power – as agents for the social good• Digital, media, and social literacy...
Thank you!     Anne Collieranne@netfamilynews.org
AddendumSome background from the       research…
What we now know...from the youth-risk research:Harassment & cyberbullying =   most common riskNot all youth are equally...
What else we know            …from youth-risk research:           “Youth who engage in online           aggressive behavio...
Perception => reality:The power of ‘social norming’Source: Craig & Perkins, Hobart and William Smith Colleges 2008
Reinforcing social normsSource: Assessing Bullying in New Jersey Secondary Schools: Applying the SocialNorms Model to Adol...
Our report to                          Congress,                          June 2010...“Promote digital citizenship and new...
‘With great power comes             great responsibility’“         As a society, we have spent too much              time ...
Why citizenship?• It’s protective• Fosters critical thinking• Promotes agency, self-actualization• Turns users into stakeh...
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Digital citizenship basics

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Boiling digital citizenship down for easy digestion (7 slides + an addendum with some research background). I hope it helps educators make the case for using blogs, wikis, digital environments, virtual worlds, Google Docs, mobile phones, tablets, etc. in the classroom, knowing that this is the way to learn and practice digital citizenship together! No special curriculum needed.

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Digital citizenship basics

  1. 1. Digital Citizenship just the basics Anne Collier Co-Director ConnectSafely.org Executive Director Net Family News, Inc.
  2. 2. Six elements of digital citizenship• Access• Participation or “civic engagement”• Literacies: tech, media, social• Rights and responsibilities• Norms of behavior ("good citizenship”)• A sense of membership, belonging
  3. 3. The most basic definition “The central task of citizenship is learning how to be good to one another.” – A.J. Patrick Liszkiewicz
  4. 4. Expanded definition (draft)Citizenship: the rights & responsibilities of full, positive engagement in a participatory world• Rights – access & participation, free speech, privacy, physical & psychological safety, safety of material and intellectual property• Responsibilities – respect & civility -> self & others; protecting own/others’ rights & property; respectful interaction; demonstrating the blended literacy of a networked world: digital, media, social
  5. 5. Digital citizenship tends to unfold… 5th grade teacher writes about her students’ ‘Digital Citizenship Minute’
  6. 6. Get the ‘pool’ into school!
  7. 7. The pillars of citizenship learning • Infrastructure • Practice • Guidance • AgencyPhoto by Julian Turner
  8. 8. Digital learning’s progression1. Classroom engagement2. Civic engagement (participation)3. Civic efficacy
  9. 9. Students’ definitions…Developing and determining the best…•Means of communication & self-expression•Strategies for maintaining the line betweenpersonal and professional expression•Media tools for reaching one’scommunication/expression goals•Ethics for online practices and expression•Ways to function in collaboration & community…of digital literacy
  10. 10. Our Space:Being a Responsible Citizen of the Digital World (great free curriculum from USC and Harvard)
  11. 11. What’s in it for students?• Safety and support• Power – as agents for the social good• Digital, media, and social literacy• Practice in the collaborative problem-solvingtheir futures will demand• Opportunities to co-create the social norms ofsocial media & a networked world• Preparation for success, leadership
  12. 12. Thank you! Anne Collieranne@netfamilynews.org
  13. 13. AddendumSome background from the research…
  14. 14. What we now know...from the youth-risk research:Harassment & cyberbullying = most common riskNot all youth are equally at risk A child’s psychosocial makeup & environment are better predictors of online risk than the technology he or she uses No single technological development can solve youth online risk
  15. 15. What else we know …from youth-risk research: “Youth who engage in online aggressive behavior … aremore than twice as likely to report onlineinterpersonal victimization.” – Archives of Pediatrics, 2007
  16. 16. Perception => reality:The power of ‘social norming’Source: Craig & Perkins, Hobart and William Smith Colleges 2008
  17. 17. Reinforcing social normsSource: Assessing Bullying in New Jersey Secondary Schools: Applying the SocialNorms Model to Adolescent Violence: Craig, Perkins 2008
  18. 18. Our report to Congress, June 2010...“Promote digital citizenship and newmedia literacy in pre-K-12 educationas a national priority.” – Youth Safety on a Living Internet: Report of the Online Safety & Technology Working Group
  19. 19. ‘With great power comes great responsibility’“ As a society, we have spent too much time focused on what media are doing to young people and not enough time asking what young people are doing with media. Rather, we need to embrace an approach based on media ethics, one that empowers young people to take greater responsibility for their own actions and holds them accountable for the choices they make as media producers and members of online communities.” – Prof. Henry Jenkins, USC
  20. 20. Why citizenship?• It’s protective• Fosters critical thinking• Promotes agency, self-actualization• Turns users into stakeholders, citizens• Supports community well-being & goals

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