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Online Groups       Experience from an eTwinning Learning Event                         March 2013                 eTwinni...
How active were the participants?      Plot showing participant messages over timeFrequency ofmessagesrelated closelyto ac...
How active were the participants?                  What the results suggest•  Participants were very much focused on the a...
Leading to autonomy                     What about ‘lurkers’?A ‘lurker’ is someone who passively participates in the onlin...
Leading to autonomy                  The example of Lantha•  Lantha is a teacher from Greece•  In the Learning Event, she ...
Leading to autonomy          Legitimate Peripheral ParticipationLurking in an online group may be a good thing.Lave and We...
Leading to autonomyCritical thinking and competence developmentCritical thinking is about   ‘reasonable reflective thinkin...
Leading to autonomy            Critical thinking: a theoretical modelLinking private thoughts                             ...
Leading to autonomy                                                      Critical thinking: a theoretical model           ...
Leading to autonomy                  Reflective practitionersAs a participant …ü  Give examples of what happened to you i...
Leading to autonomy              Encouraging critical thinkingAs a moderator …ü  Ask participants to try things out in th...
Thank you                                      Brian.Holmes@skynet.be                                      http://holmesbr...
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Holmes online groups

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This is Brian Holmes presentation from the workshop entitled eTwinning Groups: share, connect, develop

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Holmes online groups

  1. 1. Online Groups Experience from an eTwinning Learning Event March 2013 eTwinning conference, Lisbon Brian Holmes, Lancaster University &The Executive Agency for Education, Audiovisual and Culture with the support of Tiina Sarisalmi, Municipality of Orivesi, Finland & European Schoolnet, Belgium
  2. 2. How active were the participants? Plot showing participant messages over timeFrequency ofmessagesrelated closelyto activitiesand to themessagesfrom themoderatorParticipantslessdependent onmoderatortowards theend 2 http://www.slideshare.net/holmebn
  3. 3. How active were the participants? What the results suggest•  Participants were very much focused on the activities: –  They posted messages when needed to achieve the goal of a shared activity –  Little interaction when the online activity was finished or when they were busy with activities in their own teaching practice•  Participants’ initial interaction followed closely that of the moderator –  They responded to prompts from the moderator –  They responded to feedback•  Participants became more autonomous over time –  Less influenced by messages from the moderator towards the end –  They seemed to be more proactive, supporting one another towards the end 3
  4. 4. Leading to autonomy What about ‘lurkers’?A ‘lurker’ is someone who passively participates in the onlinediscussion forums, perhaps reading the messages of others, but notactively contributing themselves.Is lurking necessarily a bad thing?Let’s look at the example of Lantha ... 4
  5. 5. Leading to autonomy The example of Lantha•  Lantha is a teacher from Greece•  In the Learning Event, she posted very few messages•  When interviewed about her experience she said: ‘I made a seminar with my partners here in Greece and I transferred these tools to them, the main idea about them. It was very useful, I said that everyday that I am really grateful that I learned so much things.’•  This suggests that Lantha may have been a lurker, however she was far from passive•  She was using what she was learning from the online discussions to apply this with her colleagues in her school 5
  6. 6. Leading to autonomy Legitimate Peripheral ParticipationLurking in an online group may be a good thing.Lave and Wenger (1991) call this ‘legitimate peripheral participation’.They argue that participants often start at the edge of a community andgradual move to the centre as they become more confident andexperienced.This may be the case for Lantha: in future Learning Events, she may bemore active in her participation.The lurkers of today are the active participants of the future! 6
  7. 7. Leading to autonomyCritical thinking and competence developmentCritical thinking is about ‘reasonable reflective thinking focused on deciding what to believe or do’ (Ennis, 2002) ‘purposeful, self-regulatory judgment which results in interpretation, analysis, evaluation … as well as explanation of the … considerations upon which that judgment is based’ (Facione, 2013)Critical thinking is important for competence development;it and helps teachers to prepare for the ill-defined problems of the future. 7
  8. 8. Leading to autonomy Critical thinking: a theoretical modelLinking private thoughts Constructing meaning,to real world, as ideas moving between reflectionare explored: adding to and discourse: integratingwhat has been said ideas from different sourcesCognition Critical thinking Direct or vicarious action asInitial phase, issues and solutions are implemented andproblems emerge: assessed: evaluating results,asking questions linking to wider context (Garrison et al., 2001, p.99) 8
  9. 9. Leading to autonomy Critical thinking: a theoretical model Critical thinking Analysis suggests critical thinking reached in later stages of the Learning Event Resolution IntegrationCognitive  presence Exploration Cognition Triggering event Other 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 Messages  in  order  of  time  (first  to  last) Example of Edita: illustrates the progression in cognition for a typical participant 9
  10. 10. Leading to autonomy Reflective practitionersAs a participant …ü  Give examples of what happened to you in practice, why you think it happened and what you would recommend to others.ü  Encourage your colleagues to go into more detail, to explain their reasoning.ü  Make suggestions to help colleagues express themselves.ü  Be critical but supportive of others.ü  Be sociable and share your feelings.ü  Be creative; sharing is fun J. 10
  11. 11. Leading to autonomy Encouraging critical thinkingAs a moderator …ü  Ask participants to try things out in their teaching practiceü  Allow time for reflection and get them to share their experience with others in the forumsü  Encourage expressions of feeling: joy, pride, fear, confidence, etcü  Prompt others to build upon this experience with other examplesü  Get them to suggest alternatives and talk about what might happen in different contextsü  Encourage participants to draw conclusionsü  Use creative forms of expression such as images 11
  12. 12. Thank you Brian.Holmes@skynet.be http://holmesbrian.blogspot.com/ReferencesENNIS, R. (2002). A Super-Streamlined Conception of Critical Thinking.http://faculty.education.illinois.edu/rhennis/index.htmlGARRISON, D. R., ANDERSON, T. & ARCHER, W. (2001) ‘Critical thinking, cognitive presence, and computerconferencing in distance education’, American Journal of Distance Education, 15 (1), pp.7-23.FACIONE, P.A. (2013) Critical Thinking: What It is and Why It Counts, p. 26,http://www.insightassessment.com/content/download/1176/7580/file/What%26why2013.pdfLAVE, J. & WENGER, E. (1991) Situated Learning: Legitimate Peripheral Participation. Cambridge, CambridgeUniversity Press. 12

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