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KEEPING FOOD
SAFE IN STORAGE
Food Storage
is both a traditional domestic skill and is
important industrially. Food is stored by almost
every human soci...
In any HACCP-based or conventional system,
proper storage is another line of defense from
microbial growth and contaminati...
Storage principlesDespite the wide variety of products found in a foodservice facility, a
few general principles can be su...

Storing of food has several main
purposes:

Storage of harvested and processed plant and animal food products
for distr...
Dry Food Storage

Pertains to those foods not
likely to support bacterial growth
in their normal state.

These foods inc...
Important temperatures in sanitation
and food protection
Food Handling and Preparation
We face 2 major sanitation problems when
handling and preparing food. The first is
CROSS CON...
Cleaning and Sanitizing Equipment
• Cleaning- means removing visible
soil.
• Sanitizing- means killing disease-
causing ba...
Manual Dishwashing
*Procedure for manual dishwashing:
1.Scrape and Rinse.
2. Wash.
3. Rinse.
4. Sanitize
5. Drain and Air ...
Mechanical Dishwashing
The steps in washing dishes by machine are the same aas in the
hand method, except that themachine ...
Rodent and Insect Control
Rats, mice, flies and cockroaches can spread
disease by contaminating food and food contact
surf...
Ensures good-food handling
procedures:
1. Do not breathe or blow into a bag,, lick your fingers or put the end of a piping...
9. Follow these basic steps in cleaning dishes, utensils and equipment:
• -Soften baked-on food residue by pre-soaking.
• ...
the four guidelines to keep food
safe:

Clean—Wash hands and surfaces often.

Separate—Don't cross-contaminate.

Cook—C...
The safe storage of food for home use should strictly adhere
to guidelines set out by reliable sources, such as the United...
Freezer temperature should be maintained at 0°F and below. Food should never be
thawed at room temperature, this increases...
Refrigeration
It is important to note that safe food storage using refrigeration
requires adhering to temperature guidelin...
Storing oils and fats
Oils and fats can begin to go rancid quickly when not stored
safely. Rancid cooking oils and fats do...
Food rotation
Food rotation is important to preserve freshness. When
food is rotated, the food that has been in storage th...
KEEPING FOOD  SAFE IN STORAGE
KEEPING FOOD  SAFE IN STORAGE
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KEEPING FOOD SAFE IN STORAGE

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KEEPING FOOD SAFE IN STORAGE

  1. 1. KEEPING FOOD SAFE IN STORAGE
  2. 2. Food Storage is both a traditional domestic skill and is important industrially. Food is stored by almost every human society and by many animals.
  3. 3. In any HACCP-based or conventional system, proper storage is another line of defense from microbial growth and contamination. While storage is necessary, the quality of most food does not improve over time, and incorrect storage practices have the potential to cause serious and costly problems. There is a direct relationship between cost control, food safety, and the need to maintain good storage practices.
  4. 4. Storage principlesDespite the wide variety of products found in a foodservice facility, a few general principles can be successfully applied to most storage situations. The rules that follow cover storage of all types of food: 1. Follow the first rule First In, First Out (FIFO). Sticking to this principle means that goods should be used in the order in which they are delivered. 2. Keep potentially hazardous foods out of the temperature danger zone, which is 40 to 140 F (4.4 to 60 C)⁰ ⁰ ⁰ ⁰ 3. Storage food only in areas designed for storage. 4. Keep all goods in clean, undamaged wrappers or packages. 5. Keep storage areas clean and dry. 6. Keep vehicles for transporting food within the establishment clean.
  5. 5.  Storing of food has several main purposes:  Storage of harvested and processed plant and animal food products for distribution to consumers  Enabling a better balanced diet throughout the year  Reducing kitchen waste by preserving unused or uneaten food for later use  Preserving pantry food, such as spices or dry ingredients like rice and flour, for eventual use in cooking  Preparedness for catastrophes, emergencies and periods of food scarcity or famine  Religious reasons  Protection from animals or theft.
  6. 6. Dry Food Storage  Pertains to those foods not likely to support bacterial growth in their normal state.  These foods include:  Flour  Sugar and salt  Cereals, rice, and otheer grains  Dried beans and peas  Ready-prepred cereals  Breads and crackers  Oils and shortenings  Canned and bottled foods(unopened) • Store dry foods in a cool, dry place, off the floor, away from the wall, and not under a sewer line. • Keep all continers tightly closed to proteect from inseects, rodents and dust. Dry foods can be contaminated, even if they don't need refrrigeration.
  7. 7. Important temperatures in sanitation and food protection
  8. 8. Food Handling and Preparation We face 2 major sanitation problems when handling and preparing food. The first is CROSS CONTAMINATION, which is the transfer of bacteria to food from another food or from equipmnt or work surfaces. The second problem is that, while we are working on it, food is usually at a temperature between 41ºF and 140ºF, or in the food danger zone.the lag phase of bacteria growth help us a little but, to be safe, we must keep foods out of the danger zone whenever possible.
  9. 9. Cleaning and Sanitizing Equipment • Cleaning- means removing visible soil. • Sanitizing- means killing disease- causing bacteria. • Two ways of killing bacteria are by: heat and by: chemicals.
  10. 10. Manual Dishwashing *Procedure for manual dishwashing: 1.Scrape and Rinse. 2. Wash. 3. Rinse. 4. Sanitize 5. Drain and Air Dry.
  11. 11. Mechanical Dishwashing The steps in washing dishes by machine are the same aas in the hand method, except that themachine does the washing, rinsing, and ssanitizing. *Procedure for Mechanical Dishwahing: 1. Scrape and Rinse 2. Rack dishes so that dishwasher spray will strike all surfaces. 3. Run machine for a full cycle. 4. Sanitizing Temperatures: - 180ºF for machines that sanitize by heat - 140ºF for machines that sanitize by chemical disinfectant. 5. Air dry and inspect dishes. Do not touch food contact surfaces.
  12. 12. Rodent and Insect Control Rats, mice, flies and cockroaches can spread disease by contaminating food and food contact surfaces. Any sign of rodent or insect infestation is usually considered a serious violation of health codes. *There arefour basic methods of pest control. • Build them out. • Eliminate harborage and breeding places. • Eliminate food supplies • Exterminate.
  13. 13. Ensures good-food handling procedures: 1. Do not breathe or blow into a bag,, lick your fingers or put the end of a piping bag near your mouth. 2. Do not use newspapers or other secondhand wrapping. 3. Paper serviettes and other single-use articles must be destroyed after they have been used once. 4. Keep all food on display wrapped or protected from guest's breath. 5. Keep cooked food apart from raw food. 6. Avoid handling cooked food - use clean serving spoon and tongs. Disposable gloves should be used for assembling cold dishes. 7. No food that has been served to a customer may be used again. 8. Watch for sigs of rodents and insect infestation. If either is found, take action to eradicate them imediately.
  14. 14. 9. Follow these basic steps in cleaning dishes, utensils and equipment: • -Soften baked-on food residue by pre-soaking. • -Wash utensils in clean hot water, using a suitable detergent and brushes. • -Rinse in very hot water. • -Air dry. • -Dismantle equipment and wash the parts in a sink, wipe down fixed parts with a clean cloth. • -Put away food before starting to clean floors and walls. 10. Schedules tht summarises the law relating to cleanliness and food handling must be displayed where they maybbe easily read by employees. *For good food handling -Keep it clean -Keep it covered -Keep it hot -Keep it cold -but don't keep it long.
  15. 15. the four guidelines to keep food safe:  Clean—Wash hands and surfaces often.  Separate—Don't cross-contaminate.  Cook—Cook to proper temperatures, checking with a food thermometer.  Chill—Refrigerate promptly.
  16. 16. The safe storage of food for home use should strictly adhere to guidelines set out by reliable sources, such as the United States Department of Agriculture. These guidelines have been thoroughly researched by scientists to determine the best methods for reducing the real threat of from unsafe food storage. It is also important to maintain proper kitchen hygiene, to reduce risks of bacteria or virus growth and food poisoning. The common food poisoning illnesses include , , , , and . There are many other organisms that can also cause food poisoning. There are also safety guidelines available for the correct methods of of food. For example, there are specific boiling times that apply depending upon whether pressure canning or waterbath canning is being used in the process. These safety guidelines are intended to reduce the growth of mold and bacteria and the threat of potentially-fatal food poisoning.
  17. 17. Freezer temperature should be maintained at 0°F and below. Food should never be thawed at room temperature, this increases the risk of bacteria and virus growth and the risk of food poisoning. Once thawed, food should be used and never refrozen. Frozen food should be thawed using the following methods: -Microwave oven -During cooking -In cold water (place food in watertight, plastic bag; change water every 30 minutes) -In the refrigerator Throw out foods that have been warmer than 40 °F for more than 2 hours. If there is any doubt at all about the length of time the food has been defrosted at room temperature, it should be thrown out. Freezing does not destroy microbes present in food. Freezing at 0 °F does inactivate microbes (bacteria, yeasts and molds). However, once food has been thawed, these microbes can again become active. Microbes in thawed food can multiply to levels that can lead to foodborne illness. Thawed food should be handled according to the same guidelines as perishable fresh food. Food frozen at 0°F and below is preserved indefinitely. However, the quality of the food will deteriorate if it is frozen over a lengthy period. The United States Department of Agriculture, Food Safety and Inspection Service publishes a chart showing the suggested freezer storage time for common foods. Freezers and thawing food
  18. 18. Refrigeration It is important to note that safe food storage using refrigeration requires adhering to temperature guidelines: For safety, it is important to verify the temperature of the refrigerator. Refrigerators should be set to maintain a temperature of 40 °F or below. Some refrigerators have built-in thermometers to measure their internal temperature. For those refrigerators without this feature, keep an appliance thermometer in the refrigerator to monitor the temperature. This can be critical in the event of a power outage. When the power goes back on, if the refrigerator is still 40 °F, the food is safe. Foods held at temperatures above 40 °F for more than 2 hours should not be consumed. Appliance thermometers are specifically designed to provide accuracy at cold temperatures. Be sure refrigerator/freezer doors are closed tightly at all times. Don’t open refrigerator/freezer doors more often than necessary and close them as soon as possible.
  19. 19. Storing oils and fats Oils and fats can begin to go rancid quickly when not stored safely. Rancid cooking oils and fats do not often smell rancid until well after they have spoiled. Oxygen, light and heat all contribute to cooking oils becoming rancid. The higher the level of polyunsaturated fat that an oil contains, the faster it spoils. The percentage of polyunsaturated fat in some common cooking oils is: safflower (74%); sunflower (66%); corn (60%); soybean (37%); peanut (32%); canola (29%); olive (8%). To help prevent oils from going rancid, they should be refrigerated once opened. Opened, refrigerated cooking oils should be used within a few weeks, when some types begin to go rancid. Unopened oils can have a storage life of up to one year, but some types have a shorter shelf-life even when unopened (such as sesame and flaxseed).
  20. 20. Food rotation Food rotation is important to preserve freshness. When food is rotated, the food that has been in storage the longest is used first. As food is used, new food is added to the to replace it; the essential rationale is to use the oldest food as soon as possible so that nothing is in storage too long and becomes unsafe to eat. Labelling food with paper labels on the storage container, marking the date that the container is placed in storage, can make this practise simpler. The best way to rotate food storage is to prepare with stored food on a daily basis.

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