Sick around the world

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Sick around the world

  1. 1. Sick Around The World
  2. 2. Consumer Behavior• Consumers are beginning to use the same value criteria for healthcare decisions as they do with other purchasing decisions: • Service • Price • Experience • Brand equity…• However we cannot see a widespread change in consumer behavior
  3. 3. Consumer Behavior• With the adoption of consumer-driven plans and the current crisis, change is coming: • Many predict adoption of consumer-driven plans will rise to 15% in 2009, 50% in 2013 and 90% by 2016. • Crisis is causing more employers to drop health insurance altogether: 19% of employers are planning to stop offering health benefits over the next three to five years (five times higher than the previous year) • With a growing unemployment, the number of uninsured and underinsured increases
  4. 4. Consumer Behavior• 53% of the households said they had cut back on healthcare in the previous year due to cost concerns (Kaiser Family Foundation Health Tracking Poll)• Retailer CVS is closing 90 MinuteClinics for the reason to “align with consumer demand” (Wall Street Journal)• “We are seeing that demand is far more elastic than it was in other years” (CEO of Park Nicollet Health Services in Minneapolis)
  5. 5. Consumer Behavior• New consumer habits impact on healthcare providers: • The decrease in volume may be a permanent reduction of utilization stretch out physician visits and customer find lower-cost alternative (“home made”) • Price shopping will become the norm, as consumers carefully consider their alternatives and negotiate for lower costs • Convenience, experience and service will become the new value driver, relative to clinical quality, as patient demand more for their money • Competition in the healthcare market will become even more intense
  6. 6. Consumer Behavior
  7. 7. Financial Analysis
  8. 8. Healthcare cost
  9. 9. Healthcare cost
  10. 10. Job opportunities
  11. 11. Job opportunities
  12. 12. Some data from the USA… (2011)• 16.5% of Americans are not covered by a healthcare plan• 46% of all personal bankruptcies are related to healthcare costs• US spends 15.9% of GDP or $6,657 per capita on healthcare (twice that of the next most expensive national expenditure ranking)
  13. 13. Some data from the USA… (2011)• 20% of US healthcare dollars are lost to health insurance companies in the form of profits, and similar wastage numbers apply to big pharmaceutical companies• American life expectancy at birth ranks 50th in the world• American overall level of health ranks 72nd in the world
  14. 14. Britain preventive medicine Negative (why it shouldPositive (for the US): not work in the US):• System covers everybody • Long waiting list for• Never have to pay a patients medical bill • Hospitals compete to• Financed from the general survive and not to make taxation profits• No medical bankruptcy • Too much government for the US• Physicians are encouraged to keep people healthy • Brits are much more taxed (bonus)• World leader in preventive medicine
  15. 15. Britain Healthcare statistics vs USA• Expenditure on health % GDP: 8.4%/ 16%• Expenditure on health per capita: $2,992/ $7,290• Expenditure from private sector: 12.9%/ 52.8%• Infant mortality per 1,000 births: 4.8/ 6.7• Life expectancy at birth: 79.1 years/ 78.1 years
  16. 16. Japan: No Gatekeepers Negative (why it shouldPositive (for the US): not work in the US):• Spend half as much as the US on healthcare per capita • Doctors can’t get rich:• Longest life expectancy all over the world undervalued and underpaid• Everybody has to sign up for a health insurance policy at work or through community (for jobless) • Too much control by the• Japan’s system is largely private (80% of government for prices hospitals) regulation (“Big Brother”)• All citizens are covered and it is very cheap (fairness) • Insurance companies are• Price regulation by the government to keep prices low not allowed to make profits• Same prices everywhere in the country • 50% of hospital are in• High tech system of healthcare• Patients can see any specialists they want financial deficits• Competition between doctors, clinics and hospitals is fierce • Japanese system spend too little
  17. 17. Japanese healthcare statistics vs USA• Expenditure on health % GDP: 7.1% / 16%• Expenditure on health per capita: $2,373/ $7,290• Life expectancy: 82.25 years/ 78.1 years• Infant mortality per 1,000 births: 5/ 6.7
  18. 18. Germany: a market-based system Negative (why it shouldPositive (for the US): not work in the US):• 90 % of the population • Rich pay for the poor and the covered by the system ill are covered by the healthy• German pay premium based on their income• Population is highly satisfied• Sickness funds (1,100) compete among themselves but are not allowed to make profits• Sickness funds negotiate with drug companies and medical providers to keep prices low• Excellent quality and efficiency of the system
  19. 19. German healthcare statistics vs USA• Expenditure on health % GDP: 10.4% / 16%• Expenditure on health per capita: $3,588/ $7,290• Life expectancy: 80.07 years/ 78.1 years• Infant mortality per 1,000 births: 3.54/ 6.7
  20. 20. Taiwan: a new system Negative (why it shouldPositive (for the US): not work in the US):• A mix of all the best ideas • Government spend too little for healthcare of all around and is borrowing from banks the world to pay the providers (solution:• Equal access to healthcare increase the part of healthcare in the GDP)• Free choice of doctors• No waiting time• Encourage lots of competition among medical providers• Smart card
  21. 21. Taiwanese healthcare statistics vs USA• Expenditure on health % GDP: 5.8% / 16%• Expenditure on health per capita: $752/ $7,290• Life expectancy: 78.32 years/ 78.1 years• Infant mortality per 1,000 births: 5.18/ 6.7
  22. 22. Switzerland: a familiar system Negative (why it shouldPositive (for the US): not work in the US):• It is possible to fix the • How much people are healthcare system willing to pay the premium?• Low administrative costs • Switzerland average cost• Keep cheap universal of the premium:$750/month coverage
  23. 23. Switzerland healthcare statistics vs USA• Expenditure on health % GDP: 11.8% / 16%• Expenditure on health per capita: $4,500/ $7,290• Life expectancy: 81.07 years/ 78.1 years• Infant mortality per 1,000 births: 4.08/ 6.7
  24. 24. Healthcare around the world
  25. 25. Profits are dangerous for our health• ”We should not allow the medical-industrial complex to distort our health care system to its own entrepreneurial ends, medicine must serve patients first and stockholders second. We are in a market-oriented health care system spinning out of control’ with commercial forces influencing doctors’ judgments and manipulating a credulous public.’” Arnold Relman (editors of the New England Journal of medicine)
  26. 26. Sources• 2010 Global Survey of healthcare consumers behaviors• Sick around the world (movie)• The economic crisis: tipping point for healthcare consumer behavior• Yahoo finance

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