Attractive Things Work Better

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Attractive Things Work Better

  1. 1. ATTRACTIVE THINGS WORK BETTER by Andy Montgomery for LabShare on January ,  © Viget Labs, LLC  • This presentation is CONFIDENTIAL and should not be shared without permission.Friday, January 6, 12 NAME PLACE 1. The title of my talk today is “Attractive Things Work Better” DATE 2. based on a concept introduced originally by Don Norman in 2002
  2. 2. WHO IS DON NORMAN?Friday, January 6, 12 1. Who Is Don Norman? 2. Cognitive Scientist: Don Norman is a cognitive scientist who has taught at a number of universities including UCSD and Northwestern 3. Design Consultant: Half of the partnership at the Nielsen Norman Group with Jakob Nielsen (well known in our industry for his book “Designing Web Usability”) 4. Author: An author who advocates strongly for user-centered design. His best known book is “The Design of Everyday Things”. My talk today is largely drawn from his follow-up book “Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things”. 5. Working in the design field for nearly 50 years and has some interesting insights on how people interact with products.
  3. 3. WHO IS DON NORMAN? I. Cognitive ScientistFriday, January 6, 12 1. Who Is Don Norman? 2. Cognitive Scientist: Don Norman is a cognitive scientist who has taught at a number of universities including UCSD and Northwestern 3. Design Consultant: Half of the partnership at the Nielsen Norman Group with Jakob Nielsen (well known in our industry for his book “Designing Web Usability”) 4. Author: An author who advocates strongly for user-centered design. His best known book is “The Design of Everyday Things”. My talk today is largely drawn from his follow-up book “Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things”. 5. Working in the design field for nearly 50 years and has some interesting insights on how people interact with products.
  4. 4. WHO IS DON NORMAN? I. Cognitive Scientist II. Design ConsultantFriday, January 6, 12 1. Who Is Don Norman? 2. Cognitive Scientist: Don Norman is a cognitive scientist who has taught at a number of universities including UCSD and Northwestern 3. Design Consultant: Half of the partnership at the Nielsen Norman Group with Jakob Nielsen (well known in our industry for his book “Designing Web Usability”) 4. Author: An author who advocates strongly for user-centered design. His best known book is “The Design of Everyday Things”. My talk today is largely drawn from his follow-up book “Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things”. 5. Working in the design field for nearly 50 years and has some interesting insights on how people interact with products.
  5. 5. WHO IS DON NORMAN? I. Cognitive Scientist II. Design Consultant III. AuthorFriday, January 6, 12 1. Who Is Don Norman? 2. Cognitive Scientist: Don Norman is a cognitive scientist who has taught at a number of universities including UCSD and Northwestern 3. Design Consultant: Half of the partnership at the Nielsen Norman Group with Jakob Nielsen (well known in our industry for his book “Designing Web Usability”) 4. Author: An author who advocates strongly for user-centered design. His best known book is “The Design of Everyday Things”. My talk today is largely drawn from his follow-up book “Emotional Design: Why we love (or hate) everyday things”. 5. Working in the design field for nearly 50 years and has some interesting insights on how people interact with products.
  6. 6. WHAT WE’LL COVERFriday, January 6, 12 1. This is an outline of what I will be covering in my talk today. 2. First we’ll do a quick review of Don’s thesis that Attractive Things Work Better. 3. Then we’ll look at the underlying psychological systems that we use when we interact with products - Affective and Cognitive 4. Then we’ll examine the three levels of emotional processing that these systems impact 5. Finally I’ll give a few examples of products that work on these various levels, followed by some conclusions
  7. 7. WHAT WE’LL COVER I. “Attractive Things Work Better” ThesisFriday, January 6, 12 1. This is an outline of what I will be covering in my talk today. 2. First we’ll do a quick review of Don’s thesis that Attractive Things Work Better. 3. Then we’ll look at the underlying psychological systems that we use when we interact with products - Affective and Cognitive 4. Then we’ll examine the three levels of emotional processing that these systems impact 5. Finally I’ll give a few examples of products that work on these various levels, followed by some conclusions
  8. 8. WHAT WE’LL COVER I. “Attractive Things Work Better” Thesis II. Affective and Cognitive SystemsFriday, January 6, 12 1. This is an outline of what I will be covering in my talk today. 2. First we’ll do a quick review of Don’s thesis that Attractive Things Work Better. 3. Then we’ll look at the underlying psychological systems that we use when we interact with products - Affective and Cognitive 4. Then we’ll examine the three levels of emotional processing that these systems impact 5. Finally I’ll give a few examples of products that work on these various levels, followed by some conclusions
  9. 9. WHAT WE’LL COVER I. “Attractive Things Work Better” Thesis II. Affective and Cognitive Systems III. Emotional ProcessingFriday, January 6, 12 1. This is an outline of what I will be covering in my talk today. 2. First we’ll do a quick review of Don’s thesis that Attractive Things Work Better. 3. Then we’ll look at the underlying psychological systems that we use when we interact with products - Affective and Cognitive 4. Then we’ll examine the three levels of emotional processing that these systems impact 5. Finally I’ll give a few examples of products that work on these various levels, followed by some conclusions
  10. 10. WHAT WE’LL COVER I. “Attractive Things Work Better” Thesis II. Affective and Cognitive Systems III. Emotional Processing IV. ExamplesFriday, January 6, 12 1. This is an outline of what I will be covering in my talk today. 2. First we’ll do a quick review of Don’s thesis that Attractive Things Work Better. 3. Then we’ll look at the underlying psychological systems that we use when we interact with products - Affective and Cognitive 4. Then we’ll examine the three levels of emotional processing that these systems impact 5. Finally I’ll give a few examples of products that work on these various levels, followed by some conclusions
  11. 11. WHAT WE’LL COVER I. “Attractive Things Work Better” Thesis II. Affective and Cognitive Systems III. Emotional Processing IV. Examples V. ConclusionsFriday, January 6, 12 1. This is an outline of what I will be covering in my talk today. 2. First we’ll do a quick review of Don’s thesis that Attractive Things Work Better. 3. Then we’ll look at the underlying psychological systems that we use when we interact with products - Affective and Cognitive 4. Then we’ll examine the three levels of emotional processing that these systems impact 5. Finally I’ll give a few examples of products that work on these various levels, followed by some conclusions
  12. 12. THESIS: ATTRACTIVE THINGS WORK BETTER Or “How we think cannot be separated from how we feel” vs.Friday, January 6, 12 1. Theses: Attractive Things Work Better 2. Picture of an OXO Good Grips Peeler and a traditional peeler. (Most people who...) 3. In other words, when we feel good, we overlook challenges. (And a “challenge” can be anything. Making a phone call is a “challenge” in that it’s more difficult than talking to a person directly.) 4. When you use a pleasing design, one that looks good and feels good, the behavior seems to go along more smoothly, more easily, and better.
  13. 13. ATM STUDYFriday, January 6, 12 1. Where did this idea come from? 2. Don Norman initially got interested in this topic when he heard about a study that was done by Japanese researches where they completed user testing comparing interfaces of two different ATM keypads. The ATMs were identical in functionality and number of buttons but some had the buttons and screens arranged more attractively and the researchers found that the more attractive interface was easier for users. 3. This came as a surprise since Norman had typically overlooked the emotional reaction to products as a factor in their usability.
  14. 14. AFFECT & COGNITION  Friday, January 6, 12 1. This discovery led Dr. Norman down a path of researching how the human brain handles emotional responses to stimuli, as opposed to purely cognitive responses. 2. He began to explore the relationship between two of the brain’s primary systems that respond to stimuli: Affect and Cognition
  15. 15. AFFECT: THE EXPERIENCE OF FEELING OR EMOTIONFriday, January 6, 12 1. Affect: The experience of feeling or emotion 2. Affect is the general term for the judgmental system in our brains, both conscious and subconscious. 3. It refers to how we react to stimuli in our bodies. Emotion is the conscious experience of affect. An example of affect is that queasy feeling you get when dealing with a car-salesman but you don’t quite know why. 4. The conscious emotion is a sense of anger that you feel when you get ripped off by said car-salesman, and you know exactly why.
  16. 16. COGNITION: THE FACULTY FOR THE PROCESSING OF INFORMATION, APPLYING KNOWLEDGE, AND CHANGING PREFERENCESFriday, January 6, 12 1. Cognition: The faculty for the processing of information, applying knowledge, and changing preferences 2. The cognitive system interprets and makes sense of the world at a conscious level. 3. Cognition perceives our experiences and then works with affect to evaluate and make judgements about those experiences.
  17. 17. AFFECT EFFECTSFriday, January 6, 12 1. Affect Effects 2. These are some takeaways and findings from understanding the Affective system: 1. Emotions actually change how the mind solves problems, how the cognitive system works 2. Being happy broadens thinking, making problem (any challenge) solving faster and easier 1. A quick example: For a period of time I turned off auto-correct on my iPhone and found that I was less motivated to text. After turning it back on, I text more often and send lengthier texts. It was subtle, but if I paid attention to my emotional experience, I noticed that texting became more of a chore (a challenge) and I was less inclined to do it. After I turned it back on I noticed that I took more delight in texting and the ease with which Apple corrected all my mistyped letters. It was more than a purely functional change. 2. Another thought: Everyone who works at Viget can probably relate to the fact that your emotional state greatly affects your quality of work. If you’re tired or stressed or upset, your work tends to be simplistic and uncreative and predictable. If you’re happy and relaxed, your work is more creative and curious and pushes boundaries.
  18. 18. EMOTIONAL PROCESSING HOW AFFECT AND COGNITION IMPACT EMOTION  Friday, January 6, 12 1. Emotional Processing: How Affect and Cognition Impact Emotion 2. Now that we have a better sense of how our brains respond to stimuli, let’s dig into the ways that Affect and Cognition cause us to process experiences emotionally
  19. 19. EMOTIONAL PROCESSINGFriday, January 6, 12 1. Dr. Norman theorizes that we respond emotionally to stimuli at three different levels 2. Visceral 3. Behavioral 4. Reflective
  20. 20. EMOTIONAL PROCESSING I. VisceralFriday, January 6, 12 1. Dr. Norman theorizes that we respond emotionally to stimuli at three different levels 2. Visceral 3. Behavioral 4. Reflective
  21. 21. EMOTIONAL PROCESSING I. Visceral II. BehavioralFriday, January 6, 12 1. Dr. Norman theorizes that we respond emotionally to stimuli at three different levels 2. Visceral 3. Behavioral 4. Reflective
  22. 22. EMOTIONAL PROCESSING I. Visceral II. Behavioral III. ReflectiveFriday, January 6, 12 1. Dr. Norman theorizes that we respond emotionally to stimuli at three different levels 2. Visceral 3. Behavioral 4. Reflective
  23. 23. VISCERAL: AUTOMATIC HARDWIRED REACTIONSFriday, January 6, 12 1. Visceral: Automatic Hardwired Reactions 2. Visceral level is fast: it makes rapid judgements of what is good/bad, safe/dangerous, and sends signals to muscles and alerts the rest of the brain. This is mostly biologically determined and happens at a subconscious level. Many animals, like lizards, operate entirely at this level. Everything is an instinctual reaction. This is sometimes referred to this as your amphibian brain. 3. Examples: your sense of fear and the muscle tension associated with riding a roller coaster. Jumping when someone scares you. Visual attraction. 4. At a product level, this has entirely to do with appearances and aesthetics. It’s why you like one vehicle over another based purely on how it looks.
  24. 24. BEHAVIORAL: CONTROLS EVERYDAY BEHAVIORFriday, January 6, 12 1. Behavioral: responses that control everyday behavior and relates to the things you do with your body unconsciously all day long. This is what allows you to drive your car and talk on the phone at the same time. Sometimes this is referred to as muscle memory. 2. Examples: Chopping or dicing food with a sharp knife and solid cutting board. Typing a text on your phone. Anything you do physically that is not purely instinct, but is also not consciously thought through every time. 3. At a product level it has to do purely with function. A vehicle that drives well, has cup-holders in the right places, and doesn’t break down.
  25. 25. REFLECTIVE: CONSCIOUS THOUGHT AND EVALUATIONFriday, January 6, 12 1. Reflective responses are the realm of conscious thought and evaluation -- learning new concepts, and drawing conclusions about the world. This is the contemplative part of the brain. 2. Examples: Contemplating a serious work of literature or art which requires study and interpretation. Buying things or acting a certain way because of past experiences we’ve had or what we think it communicates about us, not specific to form or functionality. 3. At a product level it has to do with the story we want to tell and the meaning a product brings to our lives outside of its ease of use or beauty. This is why one person drives an SUV and another drives a sports car, even though they drive the same roads with the same number of passengers.
  26. 26. PERSONAL EXAMPLE: CAST IRON SKILLETFriday, January 6, 12 1. A personal example: My Cast Iron Skillet 2. One that works at all three levels is my cast iron skillet that I inherited from my great-grandmother. 3. At the visceral level, I think it’s just beautiful. It looks simple and strong with no distractions or frills. When I look at it I feel happy. 4. At the behavioral level, it just works. I can cook anything in it from a steak to a casserole. I can use it on the stove top or throw it in the oven. I don’t have to wash it, I just scrub it out after each use and it gets more seasoned over time. 5. At the reflective level, I love the story it tells. It’s probably 100 years old and connects me to my great-grandmother whom I never met. I hope to pass it along to my own kids some day. I also like what it says about me in that it’s simple with no frills and it works hard, which is how I like to think of myself.
  27. 27. CONCLUSIONS  Friday, January 6, 12
  28. 28. CONCLUSIONSFriday, January 6, 12 1. To recap, affect and emotion change our experiences. When designing things, we must keep this in mind and not focus exclusively on appearances, functionality, or the story a product tells. They must work in harmony for the best product experience. 2. Huge implications for web and software design. Getting into that would be a whole ‘nother LabShare, but these concepts should help to lay the ground work for incorporating these ideas into our design work. 3. If you’d like to know more, go to jnd.org or just Google for Don Norman and you can find his books, website, and lots of great videos on this same topic.
  29. 29. CONCLUSIONS I. RecapFriday, January 6, 12 1. To recap, affect and emotion change our experiences. When designing things, we must keep this in mind and not focus exclusively on appearances, functionality, or the story a product tells. They must work in harmony for the best product experience. 2. Huge implications for web and software design. Getting into that would be a whole ‘nother LabShare, but these concepts should help to lay the ground work for incorporating these ideas into our design work. 3. If you’d like to know more, go to jnd.org or just Google for Don Norman and you can find his books, website, and lots of great videos on this same topic.
  30. 30. CONCLUSIONS I. Recap II. Web and Software DesignFriday, January 6, 12 1. To recap, affect and emotion change our experiences. When designing things, we must keep this in mind and not focus exclusively on appearances, functionality, or the story a product tells. They must work in harmony for the best product experience. 2. Huge implications for web and software design. Getting into that would be a whole ‘nother LabShare, but these concepts should help to lay the ground work for incorporating these ideas into our design work. 3. If you’d like to know more, go to jnd.org or just Google for Don Norman and you can find his books, website, and lots of great videos on this same topic.
  31. 31. CONCLUSIONS I. Recap II. Web and Software Design III. Find out more: jnd.orgFriday, January 6, 12 1. To recap, affect and emotion change our experiences. When designing things, we must keep this in mind and not focus exclusively on appearances, functionality, or the story a product tells. They must work in harmony for the best product experience. 2. Huge implications for web and software design. Getting into that would be a whole ‘nother LabShare, but these concepts should help to lay the ground work for incorporating these ideas into our design work. 3. If you’d like to know more, go to jnd.org or just Google for Don Norman and you can find his books, website, and lots of great videos on this same topic.

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