Compete Or Get Beat!

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A practical guide to sales and marketing for anyone serious about getting ahead of the competition

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  • Compete Or Get Beat!

    1. 1. get ready to………….
    2. 2. who the hell is andy hanselman? I help forward thinking organisations improve their competitiveness and profitability
    3. 3. how i work
    4. 4. how i work
    5. 5. how i work
    6. 6. how i work
    7. 7. about this presentation….
    8. 8. you’ll hear : <ul><li>Why ‘traditional’ marketing methods are failing </li></ul><ul><li>Why ‘customer satisfaction’ is pointless </li></ul><ul><li>What it means to you </li></ul><ul><li>What you should do to compete, not get beat </li></ul>
    9. 9. for stuff like this (and more) visit . . . . . www.andyhanselman.com
    10. 10. what does success look like?
    11. 11. satisfied customers
    12. 12. sufficient ‘delighted’ customers
    13. 13. sufficient ‘devoted’ customers committed motivated effective people maximised financial returns
    14. 14. S W O T
    15. 15. Sheffield Wednesday On Their way down
    16. 16. Strengths Weaknesses Opportunities Threats
    17. 17. what exactly is marketing?
    18. 18. classic definition of marketing “ Marketing is a social and managerial process by which individuals and groups obtain what they need and want through creating and exchanging products and value with others”
    19. 19. our definition of marketing “ finding, attracting and keeping the customers that you want while maximising your profits”
    20. 20. what we’re up against (and why ‘traditional’ marketing methods are failing)
    21. 21. “ in every single industry there is now overcapacity of production and lack of capacity in terms of people” sir martin sorrell, chief executive WPP
    22. 22. <ul><li>The number of tv channels has increased from 4 to over 350 in the last 10 years </li></ul><ul><li>Over 10,000 radio stations to choose from </li></ul><ul><li>Ovr 63 million txt msgs sent per day </li></ul><ul><li>10 billion spam mails are sent worldwide </li></ul><ul><li>daily, a 25 fold increase from 2000 </li></ul>
    23. 23. ‘ it’s not the age of the internet, it’s the age of customer control’ Anne Busquet – CEO American Express
    24. 24. ‘ We’re in the age of the ‘Never – satisfied’ customer’ Regis McKenna, Author and Management Guru
    25. 25. ‘ In an average day, you can expect to have contact with around 1500 trademarked products. If you go to the supermarket, rack that up to 35,000’ Kevin Roberts, CEO Worldwide, Saatchi & Saatchi
    26. 26. customer promiscuity is increasing
    27. 27. Gammerellis sacked as vestment suppliers to the Vatican after 213 years!
    28. 28. trust in institutions is declining
    29. 29. “ % who claimed to have a great deal of confidence in the army fell from 88% to 72%” “ confidence in the legal system fell from 58% to 22%” “ confidence in the civil service fell from 46% to 17%” source: the lonely customer, royal mail between 1983 and 2000……..
    30. 30. word of mouth is on the increase
    31. 31. … In 2000, this had risen to 76%” “ In 1997, 78% of people said they would recommend a company they like to others … In 2000, this had risen to 90%” “ In 1999, 60% of people would buy a product based on recommendation Source: the lonely customer, royal mail
    32. 32. the result?
    33. 33. we all have to work harder at building and maintaining trust
    34. 35. if only adverts told the truth
    35. 44. our definition of marketing “ finding, attracting and keeping the customers that you want while maximising your profits”
    36. 45. our definition of marketing “ finding , attracting and keeping the customers that you want while maximising your profits”
    37. 46. idea one identify the customers you want to work with
    38. 47. HIGH ENTREPRENEURIAL LOW ENTREPRENEURIAL HIGH SELL ON OPPS LOW SELL ON OPPS A B C D
    39. 48. idea two get rid of the customers you don’t want
    40. 49. “ One in two businesses cannot accurately determine their profitable customers and products” Source: KPMG,
    41. 50. our definition of marketing “ finding, attracting and keeping the customers that you want while maximising your profits”
    42. 51. our definition of marketing “ finding, attracting and keeping the customers that you want while maximising your profits”
    43. 52. idea three revolutionise!
    44. 53. competitive advantage: <ul><li>“ a ‘bundle’ of distinct and unmatchable skills methods and practices that differentiate the business from its competitors” </li></ul>
    45. 54. competitive advantage: <ul><li>Want it </li></ul><ul><li>Know about it </li></ul><ul><li>Are prepared to pay (more) for it </li></ul>Only any use if customers…..
    46. 55. why should I buy from you ?
    47. 56. “ Better, faster, cheaper is not enough. Others will always get there first or quickly catch you up. You need to be profoundly different, with a radically different customer-centred offer” Gary Hamel, Leading The Revolution
    48. 57. WORSE THAN AS GOOD AS AS BAD AS BETTER THAN REVOLUTIONARY competitiveness
    49. 58. <ul><li>first direct has 1.2 million customers. </li></ul><ul><li>It sends around 3.5 million text messages to customers every month. </li></ul><ul><li>More than 1 in 3 of first direct 's customers join because of personal recommendation. </li></ul><ul><li>first direct takes over 13,000 calls a day outside working hours. </li></ul><ul><li>According to MORI and NOP research, first direct has been the most recommended bank in the UK for the past 13 years. </li></ul><ul><li>According to MORI and NOP research, first direct has had the most satisfied customers of any UK bank for the past 13 years </li></ul><ul><li>first direct has been in profit every year since 1995. </li></ul>
    50. 59. what’s dramatically and demonstrably different about your business?
    51. 60. idea four give your customers a damn good listening to
    52. 61. idea five stand in your own queues
    53. 62. ask yourself: how easy are we to deal with?
    54. 63. introducing ........... the sales prevention officer!
    55. 64. <ul><li>being charged to park in the customer car park! </li></ul><ul><li>ringing at 4.45pm and getting an answerphone </li></ul><ul><li>receiving a letter that says ‘dear sir/madam’ from a personal business advisor! </li></ul><ul><li>being told ‘everything is on hold because we’ve got our quality assessment coming up’ </li></ul><ul><li>being passed to 4 different people when enquiring about customer care training! </li></ul><ul><li>being asked ‘can you call back next week - there’s no one here today’ </li></ul><ul><li>‘ Scriptease’ </li></ul>some examples…
    56. 65. idea six Eliminate your sales prevention officers
    57. 66. 7 things you can’t say to customers (even if you want to!)
    58. 67. “ I can see your point, but I still think it’s irrelevant”
    59. 68. “ How about &quot;never&quot;? Is “never&quot; good for you?”
    60. 69. “ I'll try being nicer if you'll try being less stupid”
    61. 70. “ You want this done by a deadline? I love deadlines. I especially like the whooshing sound they make as they go flying by”
    62. 71. “ Tell me what you need, and I'll tell you how to get along without it”
    63. 72. “ I don't have an attitude problem. You have a perception problem”
    64. 73. “ I can only please one person per day. Today is not your day. Tomorrow is not looking good either”
    65. 74. what sort of role model are you?
    66. 75. ring up your own business
    67. 76. idea seven ‘ delight’ your customers
    68. 77. customer delight surprising customers with the level of service you provide
    69. 78. now that’s customer delight!
    70. 79. customer delight <ul><li>Produces a ‘wow’ reaction </li></ul><ul><li>Appears spontaneous or unexpected </li></ul><ul><li>It’s the personal touch </li></ul><ul><li>Makes customers feel valued </li></ul><ul><li>Is memorable </li></ul><ul><li>Creates a talking point </li></ul><ul><li>Is ‘Dramatically Different’ </li></ul>
    71. 80. how could you ‘ delight ’ your customers?
    72. 81. some ideas for ‘customer delight’ <ul><li>Milk and two sugars… </li></ul><ul><li>I saw this and thought of you… </li></ul><ul><li>Welcome </li></ul><ul><li>Read this…. </li></ul><ul><li>Cards </li></ul><ul><li>Thank you </li></ul><ul><li>How are things? </li></ul><ul><li>Subscribe me! </li></ul><ul><li>Thanks for prompt payment </li></ul>
    73. 82. idea eight from ‘ delighted’ to ‘devoted’
    74. 83. HIGH EXPECTATIONS LOW EXPECTATIONS GREAT EXPERIENCE POOR EXPERIENCE
    75. 84. HIGH EXPECTATIONS LOW EXPECTATIONS GREAT EXPERIENCE POOR EXPERIENCE ‘ DELIGHTED’ <ul><li>Surprise customers with the level of service </li></ul><ul><li>you provide (positively please!) </li></ul><ul><li>Build on this to create ‘devotees’ </li></ul>
    76. 85. HIGH EXPECTATIONS LOW EXPECTATIONS GREAT EXPERIENCE POOR EXPERIENCE ‘ DEVOTED’ ‘ DELIGHTED’ <ul><li>Customers come back for more, and tell others </li></ul><ul><li>Raising the bar means competitors can’t cope </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency is the key </li></ul><ul><li>Surprise customers with the level of service </li></ul><ul><li>you provide (positively please!) </li></ul><ul><li>Build on this to create ‘devotees’ </li></ul>
    77. 86. HIGH EXPECTATIONS LOW EXPECTATIONS GREAT EXPERIENCE POOR EXPERIENCE ‘ DEVOTED’ ‘ DISAPPOINTED’ ‘ DELIGHTED’ <ul><li>Customers come back for more, and tell others </li></ul><ul><li>Raising the bar means competitors can’t cope </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency is the key </li></ul><ul><li>High expectations means even little things </li></ul><ul><li>can ‘disappoint’ </li></ul><ul><li>How do you spot ‘disappointed’ customers? </li></ul><ul><li>The way you deal with the problem can help </li></ul><ul><li>create ‘devotion’ or ‘disaffection’ </li></ul><ul><li>Surprise customers with the level of service </li></ul><ul><li>you provide (positively please!) </li></ul><ul><li>Build on this to create ‘devotees’ </li></ul>
    78. 87. HIGH EXPECTATIONS LOW EXPECTATIONS GREAT EXPERIENCE POOR EXPERIENCE ‘ DEVOTED’ ‘ DISAPPOINTED’ ‘ DELIGHTED’ ‘ DISAFFECTED’ <ul><li>Customers come back for more, and tell others </li></ul><ul><li>Raising the bar means competitors can’t cope </li></ul><ul><li>Consistency is the key </li></ul><ul><li>High expectations means even little things </li></ul><ul><li>can ‘disappoint’ </li></ul><ul><li>How do you spot ‘disappointed’ customers? </li></ul><ul><li>The way you deal with the problem can help </li></ul><ul><li>create ‘devotion’ or ‘disaffection’ </li></ul><ul><li>Surprise customers with the level of service </li></ul><ul><li>you provide (positively please!) </li></ul><ul><li>Build on this to create ‘devotees’ </li></ul><ul><li>Customers don’t expect much, and don’t get it! </li></ul><ul><li>Extremely difficult to win customers back </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t allow this to happen </li></ul>
    79. 88. were you completely happy with our service?
    80. 89. idea nine take action, not notes
    81. 90. sameness sucks gary hamel
    82. 91. “ be unfashionable - take risks” paul arden ex saatchi and saatchi
    83. 92. if you can’t demonstrate you’re revolutionary , you’re invisible
    84. 93. “ stand out” and deliver
    85. 94. scare yourself, otherwise you’re not doing anything new Mary Murphy Hoye, Head Of R & D, Intel
    86. 95. don’t just stand there….. do something! dick dastardly
    87. 96. people can be divided into three groups
    88. 97. those who make things happen those who watch things happen those who ask ‘ what happened ’?
    89. 98. MISSING YOU ALREADY! want more? visit: www.andyhanselman.com

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