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Persuasion
What is persuasion?
Under what circumstances might a person need to employ persuasive techniques?
What text types tend to be used to persuade?
What makes a text persuasive?
Language (words) Structure (organisation &  order of ideas) Form (techniques)
Language (words) Structure (organisation &  order of ideas) Form (techniques)
What  techniques and word types  do you already know that can be used to persuade another person or group?
Rhetoric 101 The art of eloquently convincing an audience of your opinion or viewpoint
Formality & flattery Adopt a formal and flattering tone – but don’t be effusive or sycophantic!
Personal pronouns Personalise the delivery by using ‘we’, ‘you’ and ‘your’
Appeal to the head Logic, common sense
Appeal to the heart Fear, guilt, empathy, altruism
Hard evidence Facts, statistics, research & surveys,
Soft evidence Expert opinion, anecdotes & examples
Incentives Rewards, offers, accentuate the positives
Humour A wry sense of humour whilst not seeming flippant about serious issues can win over an audience
The law of contrast All things are relative!
Hyperbole Credible exaggeration for effect
Emotive language Don’t shy away from strongly expressed opinion and dramatic vocabulary
Rule of 3 It’s simple, repeatable and very effective!
Poetic devices Alliteration, simile & metaphor to paint word pictures and create musicality
Rhetorical questions Can you think of a good reason why you wouldn’t include them in your writing?
Imperatives As you gain confidence that you have hooked your audience, don’t be afraid to use commands to drive home your ...
Rhetoric revisited Formality & flattery Personal pronouns Appeal to the head Appeal to the heart Hard evidence  Soft evide...
Rhetoric Bingo!
How to structure a persuasive text
Language (words) Structure (organisation &  order of ideas) Form (techniques)
What kind of  structure  do you think is most likely to make your text memorable and persuasive?
A hard-hitting  opening line
The  first paragraph  should offer an overview of your stance or opinion that you will be putting forward for consideration
The  main body  of your writing will be divided into clear paragraphs – each will present a new point or idea that support...
Make full use of the  rhetorical techniques  you are now familiar with in each of your paragraphs to ensure that the CONTE...
Your  final paragraph  should summarise your stance and reinforce the strength of the ideas you have presented
The  last line  should be memorable, punchy and an ‘applause cue’
Past paper questions GCSE
When teachers apply for a job at school, they receive a pack containing information about the school.  Write a section of ...
An open air concert has been planned for next summer but the farmer who owns the land where the concert is to be held has ...
‘ Killer drop’ is a popular ride in a local amusement park.  A group of lobbyists are calling for it to be permanently shu...
An action group called ‘Cut Road Deaths Now’ wants to change the age at which young people are allowed to drive (from 17 t...
Your local council intends to allow a supermarket chain to build a new store on a piece of nearby green land. Write a lett...
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Persuasive writing

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An introduction to persuasive writing and rhetoric for keystage 3 or GCSE students

Published in: Education, Technology

Persuasive writing

  1. 1. Persuasion
  2. 2. What is persuasion?
  3. 3. Under what circumstances might a person need to employ persuasive techniques?
  4. 4. What text types tend to be used to persuade?
  5. 5. What makes a text persuasive?
  6. 6. Language (words) Structure (organisation & order of ideas) Form (techniques)
  7. 7. Language (words) Structure (organisation & order of ideas) Form (techniques)
  8. 8. What techniques and word types do you already know that can be used to persuade another person or group?
  9. 9. Rhetoric 101 The art of eloquently convincing an audience of your opinion or viewpoint
  10. 10. Formality & flattery Adopt a formal and flattering tone – but don’t be effusive or sycophantic!
  11. 11. Personal pronouns Personalise the delivery by using ‘we’, ‘you’ and ‘your’
  12. 12. Appeal to the head Logic, common sense
  13. 13. Appeal to the heart Fear, guilt, empathy, altruism
  14. 14. Hard evidence Facts, statistics, research & surveys,
  15. 15. Soft evidence Expert opinion, anecdotes & examples
  16. 16. Incentives Rewards, offers, accentuate the positives
  17. 17. Humour A wry sense of humour whilst not seeming flippant about serious issues can win over an audience
  18. 18. The law of contrast All things are relative!
  19. 19. Hyperbole Credible exaggeration for effect
  20. 20. Emotive language Don’t shy away from strongly expressed opinion and dramatic vocabulary
  21. 21. Rule of 3 It’s simple, repeatable and very effective!
  22. 22. Poetic devices Alliteration, simile & metaphor to paint word pictures and create musicality
  23. 23. Rhetorical questions Can you think of a good reason why you wouldn’t include them in your writing?
  24. 24. Imperatives As you gain confidence that you have hooked your audience, don’t be afraid to use commands to drive home your point
  25. 25. Rhetoric revisited Formality & flattery Personal pronouns Appeal to the head Appeal to the heart Hard evidence Soft evidence Incentives Humour The law of contrast Hyperbole Emotive language The rule of 3 Poetic devices Rhetorical questions Imperatives
  26. 26. Rhetoric Bingo!
  27. 27. How to structure a persuasive text
  28. 28. Language (words) Structure (organisation & order of ideas) Form (techniques)
  29. 29. What kind of structure do you think is most likely to make your text memorable and persuasive?
  30. 30. A hard-hitting opening line
  31. 31. The first paragraph should offer an overview of your stance or opinion that you will be putting forward for consideration
  32. 32. The main body of your writing will be divided into clear paragraphs – each will present a new point or idea that supports your overarching premise
  33. 33. Make full use of the rhetorical techniques you are now familiar with in each of your paragraphs to ensure that the CONTENT and STRUCTURE complement one another
  34. 34. Your final paragraph should summarise your stance and reinforce the strength of the ideas you have presented
  35. 35. The last line should be memorable, punchy and an ‘applause cue’
  36. 36. Past paper questions GCSE
  37. 37. When teachers apply for a job at school, they receive a pack containing information about the school. Write a section of this pack in which you, as a student, try to persuade teachers to come to work at your school.
  38. 38. An open air concert has been planned for next summer but the farmer who owns the land where the concert is to be held has received objections from locals. He is now undecided about whether or not to allow the event to take place. Write a letter persuading him to allow the concert to go ahead.
  39. 39. ‘ Killer drop’ is a popular ride in a local amusement park. A group of lobbyists are calling for it to be permanently shut down. There is a proposed meeting on the issue taking place tonight in the town hall and you have been asked to deliver a speech, arguing your opinion on the issue as a representative of young people in the area. Write the speech.
  40. 40. An action group called ‘Cut Road Deaths Now’ wants to change the age at which young people are allowed to drive (from 17 to 21). Write a letter to the leader of the group persuading them that the proposed change is unwise.
  41. 41. Your local council intends to allow a supermarket chain to build a new store on a piece of nearby green land. Write a letter for your local newspaper in which you try to persuade local people that this is unacceptable.

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