Run ons

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Run ons

  1. 1. Run-ons and Comma Splices
  2. 2. What is a run-on? A run-on is two complete sentences (also called independent clauses) joined without any punctuation.Example:Bernard loved his part-time job at the local newspaper there was one problem.
  3. 3. What is a comma splice? A comma splice is two complete sentences (or independent clauses) joined by only a comma.Example:Nearly all the people who worked there had the same habit, it was a habit that had always annoyed Bernard.
  4. 4. How can you identify run-ons and comma splices? Find each of the independent clauses in a sentence. Check to see how they are joined. Is there any punctuation between them? If not, you may be looking at a run-on. If there is a comma between independent clauses, look for a coordinating conjunction (like and, but, for, so, or, yet). If there is none, you may be looking at a comma splice.
  5. 5. How can you correct run-ons and comma splices?There are four ways to correct a run-on or a comma splice:- Add a period.- Add a semicolon.- Add a comma and a coordinating conjunction.- Add a dependent word.
  6. 6. Add a period.You can split run-ons and comma splices into two separate sentences by adding a period between them.After adding the period, capitalize the letter that begins the new sentence.Reread your new sentences to make sure they each contain a subject, a verb, and a complete thought.
  7. 7. ExampleRun-on: Each person had a chair next to his or her desk for visitors their visitors were not able to sit in many of those chairs.Corrected: Each person had a chair next to his or her desk for visitors. Their visitors were not able to sit in many of those chairs.
  8. 8. Add a semicolon.A second way to correct run-ons and comma splices is to use a semicolon [;] to join the two sentences.Use a semicolon only when the two sentences express closely related ideas.A semicolon can be used only where a period could also be used; the words on each side of the semicolon must be able to stand alone as a complete sentence.Do not capitalize the word that follows a semicolon unless it is the name of a specific person, place, or thing that is usually capitalized.
  9. 9. ExampleRun-on: Bernard wanted to break this habit after all, why couldn’t a chair be used as a chair?Corrected: Bernard wanted to break this habit; after all, why couldn’t a chair be used as a chair?
  10. 10. Add a comma and a coordinating conjunction.A third way to correct run-ons is to add a comma and a coordinating conjunction: and, but, or, nor, so, for, or yet. Think of a coordinating conjunction as a link that joins independent clauses to form one sentence.A comma splice already has a comma, so you need to add only a conjunction.Before choosing a conjunction, read the independent clauses aloud to see which word best expresses the relationship between them.
  11. 11. ExampleComma splice: Eventually, he got to everyone in the office, one by one, the chairs were cleared of clutter.Corrected: Eventually, he got to everyone in the office, and one by one, the chairs were cleared of clutter.
  12. 12. Add a dependent word.A fourth way to correct run-ons and comma splices is to make one of the complete sentences a dependent clause by adding a dependent word, such as after, because, before, if, though, even though, unless, or when.Choose the dependent word (or subordinating conjunction) that best expresses the relationship between the two clauses.
  13. 13. ExampleRun-on: Sophia thought they got the watchdog their house was robbed recently.Corrected: Sophia thought they got the watchdog because their house was robbed recently.
  14. 14. LET’S PRACTICE!CLICK HERE TO START

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