Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Commas
What are commas?Commas (,) are punctuation marks that separate  words and word groups to help readers  understand a senten...
   to separate a compound sentence: two sentences    joined by and, but, for, nor, or, so, or yet:I am tired every mornin...
   to set off appositives and interrupters:An appositive is a phrase that renames a noun.Marta Lopez, the president of ou...
   to set off adjective clauses that can be taken out    of a sentence without completely changing the    meaning. (Adjec...
   to set off quoted words from the rest of a sentence:“I know what the thief looked like,” the victim said.The police of...
   to set off yes or no when these words are a    response to a question:Yes, I like apple pie.No, I don’t like melon.
LET’S PRACTICE!CLICK HERE TO START
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Commas

3,396 views

Published on

Published in: Business, Technology
  • Be the first to comment

Commas

  1. 1. Commas
  2. 2. What are commas?Commas (,) are punctuation marks that separate words and word groups to help readers understand a sentence. Commas are used to separate three or more items in a series:I am wearing a hat, gloves, and a scarf.
  3. 3.  to separate a compound sentence: two sentences joined by and, but, for, nor, or, so, or yet:I am tired every morning, but coffee wakes me up. to set off introductory words:Unfortunately, I won’t be able to go to your party.If I am correct, we won’t arrive until 7.
  4. 4.  to set off appositives and interrupters:An appositive is a phrase that renames a noun.Marta Lopez, the president of our company, will speak at the meeting. [The underlined words rename Marta Lopez.]An interrupter is a word or word group that interrupts a sentence but does not affect the meaning of the sentence.Tim, by the way, isn’t my husband. [The underlined words interrupt the sentence.]
  5. 5.  to set off adjective clauses that can be taken out of a sentence without completely changing the meaning. (Adjective clauses begin with who, which, or that.)The Lius, who used to live in that house, moved to New Jersey.Do not use commas to set off adjective clauses essential to the meaning of a sentence.Children who see their parents read are more likely to want to read themselves.
  6. 6.  to set off quoted words from the rest of a sentence:“I know what the thief looked like,” the victim said.The police officer replied, “Please tell me.” to separate the parts of an address:They live at 254 Cherry Circle, Tyler, PA 15208. to set off the name of someone addressed directly:Tom, can you please come here?
  7. 7.  to set off yes or no when these words are a response to a question:Yes, I like apple pie.No, I don’t like melon.
  8. 8. LET’S PRACTICE!CLICK HERE TO START

×