SlideShare a Scribd company logo
1 of 54
Download to read offline
UX Professionalism
                                               Building tomorrows digital cathedrals




Note: This is an abridged version of the history of architecture and the history of user
experience design, to fit into a 45 minute presentation.
The building industry remained unchanged

for 1000’s of years




(In the most part) the building industry remained unchanged for 1000’s of years.
Unskilled labour gave way

to skilled artisans




Unskilled labour gave way to skilled artisans.

As buildings became more complex, practitioners began to specialise.
Modern city living

created ever more complexity




Modern city living created even more complexity.
As wood gave way to stone

Master Masons rose to power




Medieval buildings were built by large teams of masons, under the guidance of a master
mason.

The master mason was the most senior and experienced mason and would be in charge of
directing the other masons.

To become a master mason you would have to apprentice under a master mason for many
years before you were ready to work o your own.

However rather than having a “grand plan” medieval cathedrals were architecturally a bit of a
mess, built in a very ad hoc way.
The renaissance heralded an age of

wealth, beauty and scientific knowledge




And masons started learning more about science and engineering.

As well as study the building styles and techniques of ancient rome and greece.

17th century Italian architect Francesco Borromini (considered by some as one of the first
professional architects) had a library of over 1,000 books.
Buildings rose in complexity




Buildings rose in complexity and these buildings needed a new breed of designer.
Master masons became architects

and the field of Architecture was born




So the master masons began to be overtaken by a new profession.

Building designers like Sir Christopher Wren, who wanted to bring a more systematised and
scientific approach to buildings.

and so in the 17th and 18th century the modern field of architecture was born.

It’s interesting to note that architect comes from the greek arkhi (cheif) and tekton (builder).

It’s also worth pointing out that until modern times there wasn’t a distinction between architect
and engineer.

In fact “architects” weren’t part of any guild (unlike Masons) and were often only given their
titles because of their writings.
Modern architects

co-ordinate the design process




Ultimately architects are hybrid designers bought in to co-ordinate the process of designing a
building.

They are also responsible for the vast majority of the built environment we live in today.

With small projects, the architect may have enough skills to do the majority of the design work
themselves, handing over to an engineer to implement.

Some design-build architecture firms will do it all, but they are often looked down on by the
industry as generalists.

For big projects they need to rely on a team of people with different specialisms.
We see architects as a well defined profession

but modern architecture is multi-disciplinary
                                                                                         Building	
  technologist
                    Architectural	
  history
                                                              Structural	
  engineer

       Planing	
  regula<ons                                                              Project	
  manager
                                          CAD           Sustainability

                                                                                          Materials	
  expert
       Quan<ty	
  surveying                     Concept	
  drawing

                                                                                Dra/ing
                                     Mechanical	
  engineer
      Construc<on	
  manager                                          Design
                                                                                         Urban	
  planning
                                                   Accessibility
                     Environmental	
  	
  law
                                                                         Interior	
  design

       Planning	
  and	
  zoning          Environmental	
  psychology
                                                                                              Electrical	
  engineer


Although for some reason we rarely see articles or online discussions forcing architects to
define exactly what architecture is.

Possibly because we’ve all been born into a world of architects so assume that somebody
knows what it is they do.

But in the mid 17th century, while there were many people calling themselves architects, the
exact professional responsibility of the architect wasn’t precisely determined.

And even today there is a lot of discussion around the philosophical aspects or architecture.
Architecture schools were created

to teach these specialisms




Architecture isn’t art, engineering or design, but a culmination of all three.

As such, in order to manage standards and quality, professional organisations like the
architectural association were formed in 1857.

It was also necessary to create dedicated schools in order to teach such a specialised subject.
The history of web design is similar




We can see a similar evolution when we look at the profession of web design.
We started off as generalists




                                                           Web	
  design
                                           Web	
  design
                               Web	
  design                          Web	
  design
                                                                                  Web	
  design
                    Web	
  design
                                                                                                  Web	
  design

    Web	
  design




The industry started off mostly staffed by passionate hobbyists and generalists like myself.

We all did a bit of visual design, a bit of HTML and a bit of CGI programming.
However as digital products

became more complicated




However 20 years later, the digital products we’re designing have become increasingly
complicated.

It was no longer possible for one person to retain all the knowledge and skills necessary to
design a large-scale digital product.
Many started to specialise




                                             Web	
  design

                                                       Design	
  educa<on
                           Responsive	
  design
                                                                  Mobile	
  gaming
                    Accessibility
                                                                            User	
  Experience

    Web	
  design                                                                                Icon	
  design




Many of us started to specialise.
We undertook our own renaissance




We undertook our own mini renaissance.

As an active design profession we started to explore existing and related disciplines like
Human Factors and HCI to help us understand how people could better interact with web
technology.

We also started to explore library sciences to understand how to manage and categorise large
amounts of information.

These two fields slowly morphed into Usability, Interaction Design and Information Architecture.
Don Norman popularised the term

User Experience in the 90s




Don Norman popularised the term user experience in the early 90s.

The idea being that whenever we interact with a product or service it results in some kind of
experience.

This was an idea that encompassed traditional HCI thinking but also extended it, to cover all
the aspects of a product or service as perceived by it’s users.

Of course you can’t actually design the way somebody experiences a product or service, and I
think this is one of the big mistakes novices make when they get into UX design. However it is
possible to influence it in certain directions.

In the late 90s, a group of largely west coast designers started to think about digital design in a
much more holistic fashion.

And the field of user experience design was born.
Defining the dammed thing




If you go to UX conferences or follow any “UX people”, you may notice that there’s a habit of
trying to continuously define UX.

This may give external observers or new entrants to the industry the idea UX isn’t a well
understood thing. That couldn’t be further from the truth.

UX designers who have been in the industry for any length of time have a good understating of
their practice.

They’ve read the books and papers, attended the conferences, listened to the podcasts and
explained what they do to colleagues and clients a thousand times.

However UX practitioners are very analytical and, in an emerging and constantly changing
industry, are constantly refining the way they present themselves to the world.

So a lot of the discussion around “defining the dammed thing” is to inform new entrants to the
field, who read a smashing magazine article on usability testing once and now think that they
are user experience designers.

I suspect the architecture world went through very similar thing and to this day you’d probably
struggle to get a room full or architects to define and agree to a thorough definition of the
practice, just as you would a group of UX designers.
The elements of user experience




In 2000, Jesse James Garrett attempted to explain this growing field in a diagram (and later a
short book) entitled The Elements of User Experience.

[explain diagram]

It may seem like a very simplistic diagram, but it’s still the mental model that most user
experience practitioners have to this day.

Now if you look at the process outlined, most digital teams already had somebody highly
experienced in visual design, information design and possibly interface design, so this wasn’t a
new role they needed to create.

However only a few large organisations like the BBC had dedicated Information Architects and
usability specialists. And even then, they tended to be few and far between.

So for mid sized teams, somebody had to take on these roles. Sometimes it was the project
manager, producer or BA. Sometimes the designers or developers. And if you were lucky
enough to have a dedicated IA, they would end up finding themselves doing research, usability
testing and interaction design.

It became increasingly difficult for these people to do the extra work that was now being
thrown at them, and still maintain their day job. So people started to specialise, and the name
they settled on was user experience design.
Dan Saffer’s UX diagram




Back in 2006, Dan Saffer created this diagram in an attempt to outline the overlapping and
competing elements that make up user experience design.

As you can see from this (and many other diagrams) User Experience design encompasses
usability, information architecture, communication design and interaction design.

To be considered a user experience designer, you need to have a working knowledge of all
these fields, and depth in at least a couple.

Similarly a user experience deign agency is made up of experts in these particular areas.

He’s updated it since to encompass fields outside of digital design. Like engineering and
architecture.

Personally I’m not a fan of the inflation of user experience design to cover all forms of
“experience”.

We’ve got existing fields of practice like “service design” which covers this well.

So I personally like to consider UX design purely as a form of digital design.
The duality of UX




                                                 A job

                                      Specialised agency

                                       A field of practice

                               The natural result of design

                                The way people perceive a
                                     product/service


So one of the problems with user experience is that it’s not one thing, but multiple things.

It’s the way people perceive a product as in “that was a terrible experience”.

It’s also the natural output of the design process. So we started seeing a lot of regular
designers changing their titles to “user experience design” because hey, I influence the user
experience also.

UX design is a well understood field of practice that includes all the sub fields I previously
mentioned.

It’s something that a specific department or agency can specialise in. Just as they could
specialise in development of graphic design.

It’s also a persons job. Typically defined as somebody that does a mix of research, usability,
IA and interaction design. But typically not visual design.
Todays digital cathedrals




Around 2006, UX started to become a recognised term and even a job title in the UK.

By 2009 it was all the rage and seen as the hot new thing.

Today UX designers are in big demand and and the vast majority of modern digital cathedrals
will have been designer by UX designers.

However this demand has caused a bit of a boom.
The UX Hype Cycle




At the same time more traditional we designers started becoming familiar with the term and
many changed their names to UX designers (because there was demand and because it could
earn more money).

The more committed ones even signed onto UX related courses like the ergonomics course at
UCL.

Suddenly the market was flooded by folks that didn’t have much experience in UX.

Prices started shooting up while quality started dropping.

So while companies were reaching the peak of inflated expectations, agencies like mine were
hitting the trough of disillusionment.

Many felt that UX had become a tainted term and started distancing themselves from the term.
Big design up front




Those of our industry who cut our teeth in the late 90s and early naughties had learnt their craft
in large organisations with very formal processes.

The old guard were super experienced but really stuck in their ways.

Traditional UX people tend to be heavily weighted towards the IA and Usability side of the
spectrum.

The IA folks are incredibly analytical and ridged. They love drawing "boxes and arrows" and
producing reams and reason of documentation.

This was perfect when designing very large, mission critical systems, but wasn’t necessarily
flexible enough to cope with the new products coming their way.

I’ve worked with several old school, institutional UX people before. They are less architect and
more draftsperson.

The usability folks weren’t any better. They were great an analysing problems, but many lacked
the Design abilities to come up with good solutions.
Lean UX




So in the last couple of years the start-up industry have been pushing back with lean UX and
agile UX.

They wanted to do away with all the rigidity and formality of their predecessors and use a
lightweight, informal process instead.

This has some real benefits as you’re able to cut out a lot of the cruft and make improvements
quickly. Perfect for poorly funded projects.

So why spend months doing research and creating stacks of wireframes, when a few quick
sketches could do?

This is a great sentiment, but isn’t without it’s problems.

Lean and agile UX has put the tools and language in the hands of amateurs. And I think this is
largely a good thing, as UX is a team problem.

However without the experts to know which tools to use when, a lot of the solutions we’re
seeing are far too shallow and misguided.

So I’m seeing lots of start-ups trying to adopt so called “agile UX practices” without the benefit
of an expert, and failing badly.

So a lot of these lean UX people have a very shallow understanding of UX and don’t know
when they should and when they shouldn’t cut things out.

This can lead to significant efficiency as they struggle to solve design problems that would be
The UX professional




I believe that we live in a world where both the old guard and new guard have a place.

However I also believe there is a middle ground.

The old pros need to adopt lighter weight practices while maintaining their deep knowledge and
discipline

The new guard need to start to specialise and become more professional.

Design is a targeted activity, but with the right skills in your team it’s possible to do the work of
significantly more people.
UX as a modern design profession




In his 1933 book, the professions, Carr Saunders stated that a profession has 5 aspects.

• the foundation of a voluntary association
• the exclusion of unqualified persons
• a development of codes of conduct
• a system of tests and examinations
• and, finally, the control over relevant educational institutions
UX professional charter


                1. Be the voice of the user




Most organisations have somebody to represent the needs of the business, the needs of the
technology department and the needs of sales and marketing. Rarely do they have anybody
that represents the needs of their customers and users. So in most situations, this will be your
job.
Get out of the building




Get out of the building.

To do this you’re going to need to get out of the building and talk to real users.

It may seem obvious and it may seem scary, but it’s very easy to do and doesn’t take a lot of
resource.

We’re talking about a few days worth of user interviews. Maybe a usability test. Maybe a quick
user survey.

Doesn’t take much to understand the user.

The you can use techniques like user personas to help focus the organisation on their users
needs
UX professional charter


                1. Be the voice of the user
                2. Respect the needs of the business




However we also need to be pragmatic.

Some designers take being the voice of the user too far, and forget that in most instances they
are working for a business that also has needs, some of which may not always be served by
understanding the needs of the user.
Talk to the business




So you have to spend time getting to know the organisation and the individuals.

That doesn’t mean that you’re always going to do what the business wants. But you do need
to understand what that is.

At the end of the day, UX design is about balancing these two needs.
UX professional charter


            1. Be the voice of the user
            2. Respect the needs of the business
            3. Do no harm
Beware dark patterns
UX professional charter


            1.   Be the voice of the user
            2.   Respect the needs of the business
            3.   Do no harm
            4.   Don't forget the basics
Don’t forget the fundamentals of UX design.

Usability. IA. Interaction design.

If you don’t have these basics, none of the advanced still will be of much use.
UX professional charter


            1.   Be the voice of the user
            2.   Respect the needs of the business
            3.   Do no harm
            4.   Don't forget the basics
            5.   Pick the right tool for the job
Become tools experts




The question isn’t, “which prototyping tool should I use?”

You need to master as many tool as possible, understand the strangest and weaknesses of
each, and know when to use them.

So get to know Visio, Omnigraffle, Axure and even Balsamiq.

However also make paper prototypes, try keynote, learn HTML/CSS and try video
UX professional charter


            1.   Be the voice of the user
            2.   Respect the needs of the business
            3.   Do no harm
            4.   Don't forget the basics
            5.   Pick the right tool for the job
            6.   There's no high or low fidelity,
                 just correct fidelity.
Use the lowest fidelity tool you need




This is one of the fantastic learning from Agile.

These design artefacts are essentially communication tools.

Get to know the team and the organisation you were working with and present them with the
lowest level fidelity required to communicate intent.

If you’re co-located with an agile team, this could be a conversation round a whiteboard, a
paper sketch or an “animatic” video demo.

The less time you spend documenting, the more time you will be spent solving design
problems.

However if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail.

So if you’re working with a very conservative organisation, the stakeholders may need to see
high fidelity prototypes to fully understand what you’re proposing.

Similarly with remote or inexperienced dev teams, you’ll probably find yourself doing a lot more
documentation than you’d like.

But this is part of your job.
Learn to...




      Sketch
Learn to sketch.
UX professional charter


            1. Be the voice of the user
            2. Respect the needs of the business
            3. Do no harm
            4. Don't forget the basics
            5. Pick the right tool for the job
            6. There's no high or low fidelity,
               just correct fidelity.
            7. Be open and transparent
Communication is a design problem




Far too many designers want to spend all of their time designing.

And far too many agencies only budget for the time it takes to create deliverables.

However there’s no point crafting the perfect design if it never gets adopted.

Organisation are a design problem themselves.

Great designers understand this and use their people skills to make sure that the organisation
understands what they have been designing and why.
UX professional charter


            1. Be the voice of the user
            2. Respect the needs of the business
            3. Do no harm
            4. Don't forget the basics
            5. Pick the right tool for the job
            6. There's no high or low fidelity,
               just correct fidelity.
            7. Be open and transparent
            8. Work across disciplines
Production line thinking




Industrial age thinking has encouraged us to do discreet and specialist tasks before passing
them on to the next person in the production line.

This process is easier to manage but doesn’t take into count modern day knowledge work.
Cross functional pairing




We need to get more used to breaking out of our silos and working with other team members.

One way to do this is through “cross functional pairing”.

At the start of most of our project our UX designers and visual designers work together.

This could be with the UX designer setting up and running interviews and the visual designer
taking sketch notes.

It could be the pair of them working together to sketch out a new process flow.

Similarly our UX designers and front end developers will often work together prototyping
solutions.

By working together they get to input their own skills and abilities.

This is one way of encouraging interested designers and developers to contribute their UX
knowledge without feeling that they have to become UX designers themselves.

User experience is everybody’s responsibility and design is a team game.

All designers should care about UX, but that doesn’t mean they’re user experience designer.

All developers should care about UX, but that doesn’t mean they’re UX developers.

On projects of a certain size, a dedicated User Experience professional is needed to co-
ordinate these activities.
UX professional charter


            1. Be the voice of the user
            2. Respect the needs of the business
            3. Do no harm
            4. Don't forget the basics
            5. Pick the right tool for the job
            6. There's no high or low fidelity,
               just correct fidelity.
            7. Be open and transparent
            8. Work across disciplines
            9. Be a design facilitator
Good designers are facilitators




Design is no-longer about creative individuals coming up with their own solutions and imposing
them on a company or product.

It’s about using your interpersonal skills to create environments and activities where the whole
team can contribute their good ideas.

Why have one mind working on the problem for a month when you can have 10 minds working
on the same problem for a day?

It’s then your job to examine, sift, evaluate and hone these ideas into something of value.

In most cases the solution will simply present itself once you’ve had time to assemble all the
pieces.

So I think the ability to run interviews and workshops is the most important skill a UX person
can have.

This is a high level consultancy skill that most designers don’t feel comfortable leading.
Graphical facilitation
Graphical facilitation
Design games
UX professional charter


            1.  Be the voice of the user
            2.  Respect the needs of the business
            3.  Do no harm
            4.  Don't forget the basics
            5.  Pick the right tool for the job
            6.  There's no high or low fidelity,
                just correct fidelity.
            7. Be open and transparent
            8. Work across disciplines
            9. Be a design facilitator
            10. Strive for mastery
10,000 Hours




Malcom Gladwell looked at concert musicians and realised that to become a maestro you
needed around 10,000 hours of practice and experience before you stop analysing your
playing and instead internalise it and do it naturally.

He looked at other fields and it looked like many of them also required 10,000 hours of practice
and repetition to become competent. 10,000 hours works out roughly as 10 years of work.

It’s important to note that this does need to be 10 years of unique experience, not one year
repeated 10 times.

However considering the general work hours we do in this industry, and the amount of stuff
people do in their own time, really dedicated people can probably become experts in 5 years.
UX professional charter


                1.  Be the voice of the user
                2.  Respect the needs of the business
                3.  Do no harm
                4.  Don't forget the basics
                5.  Pick the right tool for the job
                6.  There's no high or low fidelity,
                    just correct fidelity.
                7. Be open and transparent
                8. Work across disciplines
                9. Be a design facilitator
                10. Strive for mastery

My 10 steps to becoming a true UX pro.

These aren’t the only ones so I’m sure you can find plenty more.
@andybudd
 www.clearleft.com
andy@clearleft.com

More Related Content

What's hot

The good, the bad, the ugly of UX Recruiting
The good, the bad, the ugly of UX RecruitingThe good, the bad, the ugly of UX Recruiting
The good, the bad, the ugly of UX RecruitingJason Mesut
 
Design Process | Tool 01" personae"
Design Process | Tool 01" personae"Design Process | Tool 01" personae"
Design Process | Tool 01" personae"Gessica Puri
 
UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop
UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop
UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop Chris Becker
 
DESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. Ulrich
DESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. UlrichDESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. Ulrich
DESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. UlrichMarina Caponera
 
MIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UX
MIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UXMIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UX
MIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UXOxford Tech + UX
 
Urban Information Design
Urban Information DesignUrban Information Design
Urban Information DesignSami Niemelä
 
Why UX is Important
Why UX is Important Why UX is Important
Why UX is Important Chris Becker
 
UI For Alien Cowboys
UI For Alien CowboysUI For Alien Cowboys
UI For Alien CowboysMatt Jones
 
Designing Discreetness recap @ Thingscon
Designing Discreetness recap @ ThingsconDesigning Discreetness recap @ Thingscon
Designing Discreetness recap @ ThingsconSami Niemelä
 
we are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studies
we are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studieswe are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studies
we are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studiesCarlo Frinolli Puzzilli
 
Describing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UX
Describing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UXDescribing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UX
Describing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UXEric Reiss
 
The User Experience Design of Everything
The User Experience Design of EverythingThe User Experience Design of Everything
The User Experience Design of EverythingSiyabonga Africa
 

What's hot (17)

Stillwell portfolio
Stillwell portfolioStillwell portfolio
Stillwell portfolio
 
2834964
28349642834964
2834964
 
The good, the bad, the ugly of UX Recruiting
The good, the bad, the ugly of UX RecruitingThe good, the bad, the ugly of UX Recruiting
The good, the bad, the ugly of UX Recruiting
 
Design Process | Tool 01" personae"
Design Process | Tool 01" personae"Design Process | Tool 01" personae"
Design Process | Tool 01" personae"
 
UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop
UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop
UX/Design Thinking Prototyping Workshop
 
DESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. Ulrich
DESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. UlrichDESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. Ulrich
DESIGN: creation of artifacts in society by Karl T. Ulrich
 
MIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UX
MIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UXMIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UX
MIT Enterprise Forum: Billion Dollar UX
 
Urban Information Design
Urban Information DesignUrban Information Design
Urban Information Design
 
Why UX is Important
Why UX is Important Why UX is Important
Why UX is Important
 
UI For Alien Cowboys
UI For Alien CowboysUI For Alien Cowboys
UI For Alien Cowboys
 
Rulespace
RulespaceRulespace
Rulespace
 
Designing Discreetness recap @ Thingscon
Designing Discreetness recap @ ThingsconDesigning Discreetness recap @ Thingscon
Designing Discreetness recap @ Thingscon
 
we are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studies
we are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studieswe are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studies
we are nois3 | digital design thinking | case studies
 
Describing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UX
Describing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UXDescribing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UX
Describing the elephant. - Moving beyond professional silos when defining UX
 
The User Experience Design of Everything
The User Experience Design of EverythingThe User Experience Design of Everything
The User Experience Design of Everything
 
The Importance of UX
The Importance of UXThe Importance of UX
The Importance of UX
 
What the F*** is UX?
What the F*** is UX?What the F*** is UX?
What the F*** is UX?
 

Similar to Building Digital Cathedrals

How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.
How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.
How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.tinakumavat23
 
How content strategy fits into the user experience
How content strategy fits into the user experienceHow content strategy fits into the user experience
How content strategy fits into the user experienceNick Finck
 
Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...
Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...
Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...Ogbuagu Kelechi Uchamma
 
Ux process under kanban
Ux process under kanbanUx process under kanban
Ux process under kanbanGene Timmons
 
Rethinking the Interaction Design Portfolio
Rethinking the Interaction Design PortfolioRethinking the Interaction Design Portfolio
Rethinking the Interaction Design PortfolioJoel Califa
 
Saf08 Growing Architects Kevin Francis
Saf08 Growing Architects   Kevin FrancisSaf08 Growing Architects   Kevin Francis
Saf08 Growing Architects Kevin FrancisKevin Francis
 
Architectural Design Visualisation - Then & Now
Architectural Design Visualisation - Then & NowArchitectural Design Visualisation - Then & Now
Architectural Design Visualisation - Then & NowCAD RESOLUTION
 
Sonal Gupta , Interior Design
Sonal Gupta , Interior DesignSonal Gupta , Interior Design
Sonal Gupta , Interior Designdezyneecole
 
Unthinkable Drinks - Design the Future
Unthinkable Drinks - Design the FutureUnthinkable Drinks - Design the Future
Unthinkable Drinks - Design the FutureMatthew Olney
 
Tutorial archi cad 7.0
Tutorial archi cad 7.0Tutorial archi cad 7.0
Tutorial archi cad 7.0imaduddin91
 
UX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon Tokyo
UX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon TokyoUX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon Tokyo
UX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon TokyoDirk Knemeyer
 
The difference between Web Design & web development
The difference between Web Design & web developmentThe difference between Web Design & web development
The difference between Web Design & web developmentsneharathod39
 
Autodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcement
Autodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcementAutodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcement
Autodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcementAn Nam Education
 
1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA
1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA
1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFABrian K. Seitz
 
Digital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environment
Digital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environmentDigital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environment
Digital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environmenteSAT Journals
 
Types of design
Types of designTypes of design
Types of designvaga bond
 
Architecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptx
Architecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptxArchitecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptx
Architecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptx3dteamau
 
Building-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-Innovation
Building-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-InnovationBuilding-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-Innovation
Building-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-InnovationAttitude Tally Academy
 

Similar to Building Digital Cathedrals (20)

How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.
How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.
How virtual reality is changing the way you construct your house.
 
How content strategy fits into the user experience
How content strategy fits into the user experienceHow content strategy fits into the user experience
How content strategy fits into the user experience
 
Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...
Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...
Digital Architecture, Architectural photography and the Impacts of social med...
 
Ux process under kanban
Ux process under kanbanUx process under kanban
Ux process under kanban
 
Rethinking the Interaction Design Portfolio
Rethinking the Interaction Design PortfolioRethinking the Interaction Design Portfolio
Rethinking the Interaction Design Portfolio
 
Saf08 Growing Architects Kevin Francis
Saf08 Growing Architects   Kevin FrancisSaf08 Growing Architects   Kevin Francis
Saf08 Growing Architects Kevin Francis
 
Architectural Design Visualisation - Then & Now
Architectural Design Visualisation - Then & NowArchitectural Design Visualisation - Then & Now
Architectural Design Visualisation - Then & Now
 
Sonal Gupta , Interior Design
Sonal Gupta , Interior DesignSonal Gupta , Interior Design
Sonal Gupta , Interior Design
 
Desain Grafis 4 - UI/UX
Desain Grafis 4 - UI/UXDesain Grafis 4 - UI/UX
Desain Grafis 4 - UI/UX
 
Unthinkable Drinks - Design the Future
Unthinkable Drinks - Design the FutureUnthinkable Drinks - Design the Future
Unthinkable Drinks - Design the Future
 
Tutorial archi cad 7.0
Tutorial archi cad 7.0Tutorial archi cad 7.0
Tutorial archi cad 7.0
 
UX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon Tokyo
UX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon TokyoUX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon Tokyo
UX & Emerging Technologies - Service Design Salon Tokyo
 
The difference between Web Design & web development
The difference between Web Design & web developmentThe difference between Web Design & web development
The difference between Web Design & web development
 
Autodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcement
Autodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcementAutodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcement
Autodesk revit structuretool for-modeling-concrete-reinforcement
 
1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA
1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA
1996 Enterprise Architecture Praxis Presenation @ ZIFA
 
Digital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environment
Digital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environmentDigital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environment
Digital architecture manifesting an accurate virtual built environment
 
Types of design
Types of designTypes of design
Types of design
 
Architecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptx
Architecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptxArchitecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptx
Architecture 3D Design and 3D Modeling Rendering Concepts.pptx
 
Building-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-Innovation
Building-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-InnovationBuilding-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-Innovation
Building-the-Future-Exploring-AutoCADs-Role-in-Architectural-Innovation
 
Design Fridays
Design FridaysDesign Fridays
Design Fridays
 

More from Andy Budd

I for one welcome our new robot overlords
I for one welcome our new robot overlordsI for one welcome our new robot overlords
I for one welcome our new robot overlordsAndy Budd
 
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational Interfaces
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational InterfacesThe Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational Interfaces
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational InterfacesAndy Budd
 
Desiging for competitive advantage
Desiging for competitive advantageDesiging for competitive advantage
Desiging for competitive advantageAndy Budd
 
Redefining ux
Redefining uxRedefining ux
Redefining uxAndy Budd
 
Design for Start-Ups
Design for Start-UpsDesign for Start-Ups
Design for Start-UpsAndy Budd
 
Digital Product Design
Digital Product DesignDigital Product Design
Digital Product DesignAndy Budd
 
Product management
Product managementProduct management
Product managementAndy Budd
 
Ignore UX At Your Peril
Ignore UX At Your PerilIgnore UX At Your Peril
Ignore UX At Your PerilAndy Budd
 
Persuasive Design: Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!
Persuasive Design:  Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!Persuasive Design:  Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!
Persuasive Design: Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!Andy Budd
 
Seductive Design
Seductive DesignSeductive Design
Seductive DesignAndy Budd
 
Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009
Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009
Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009Andy Budd
 
Publishing 2.0
Publishing 2.0Publishing 2.0
Publishing 2.0Andy Budd
 
Usability Testing
Usability TestingUsability Testing
Usability TestingAndy Budd
 
Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0
Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0
Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0Andy Budd
 
Architecting Human Behaviour
Architecting Human BehaviourArchitecting Human Behaviour
Architecting Human BehaviourAndy Budd
 
Designing the User Experience Curve
Designing the User Experience CurveDesigning the User Experience Curve
Designing the User Experience CurveAndy Budd
 
The Future Of CSS
The Future Of CSSThe Future Of CSS
The Future Of CSSAndy Budd
 
How to be a Web Design Superhero
How to be a Web Design SuperheroHow to be a Web Design Superhero
How to be a Web Design SuperheroAndy Budd
 
How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0
How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0
How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0Andy Budd
 
Usability Testing Computer Games
Usability Testing Computer GamesUsability Testing Computer Games
Usability Testing Computer GamesAndy Budd
 

More from Andy Budd (20)

I for one welcome our new robot overlords
I for one welcome our new robot overlordsI for one welcome our new robot overlords
I for one welcome our new robot overlords
 
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational Interfaces
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational InterfacesThe Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational Interfaces
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly of Conversational Interfaces
 
Desiging for competitive advantage
Desiging for competitive advantageDesiging for competitive advantage
Desiging for competitive advantage
 
Redefining ux
Redefining uxRedefining ux
Redefining ux
 
Design for Start-Ups
Design for Start-UpsDesign for Start-Ups
Design for Start-Ups
 
Digital Product Design
Digital Product DesignDigital Product Design
Digital Product Design
 
Product management
Product managementProduct management
Product management
 
Ignore UX At Your Peril
Ignore UX At Your PerilIgnore UX At Your Peril
Ignore UX At Your Peril
 
Persuasive Design: Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!
Persuasive Design:  Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!Persuasive Design:  Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!
Persuasive Design: Encouraging Your Users To Do What You Want Them To!
 
Seductive Design
Seductive DesignSeductive Design
Seductive Design
 
Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009
Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009
Guerilla Usability Testing — @media 2009
 
Publishing 2.0
Publishing 2.0Publishing 2.0
Publishing 2.0
 
Usability Testing
Usability TestingUsability Testing
Usability Testing
 
Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0
Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0
Designing The User Experience Curve 2.0
 
Architecting Human Behaviour
Architecting Human BehaviourArchitecting Human Behaviour
Architecting Human Behaviour
 
Designing the User Experience Curve
Designing the User Experience CurveDesigning the User Experience Curve
Designing the User Experience Curve
 
The Future Of CSS
The Future Of CSSThe Future Of CSS
The Future Of CSS
 
How to be a Web Design Superhero
How to be a Web Design SuperheroHow to be a Web Design Superhero
How to be a Web Design Superhero
 
How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0
How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0
How to Bluff Your Way in Web 2.0
 
Usability Testing Computer Games
Usability Testing Computer GamesUsability Testing Computer Games
Usability Testing Computer Games
 

Recently uploaded

General Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptx
General Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptxGeneral Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptx
General Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptxmarckustrevion
 
Color Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 Studio
Color Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 StudioColor Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 Studio
Color Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 StudioThink360 Studio
 
Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...
Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...
Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...Associazione Digital Days
 
group_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdf
group_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdfgroup_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdf
group_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdfneelspinoy
 
world health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbb
world health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbbworld health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbb
world health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbbpreetirao780
 
Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025
Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025
Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025Rndexperts
 
guest bathroom white and blue ssssssssss
guest bathroom white and blue ssssssssssguest bathroom white and blue ssssssssss
guest bathroom white and blue ssssssssssNadaMohammed714321
 
10 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 2024
10 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 202410 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 2024
10 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 2024digital learning point
 
Iconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing services
Iconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing servicesIconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing services
Iconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing servicesIconic global solution
 
guest bathroom white and bluesssssssssss
guest bathroom white and bluesssssssssssguest bathroom white and bluesssssssssss
guest bathroom white and bluesssssssssssNadaMohammed714321
 
Karim apartment ideas 02 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 02 pppppppppppppppKarim apartment ideas 02 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 02 pppppppppppppppNadaMohammed714321
 
Making and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.ppt
Making and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.pptMaking and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.ppt
Making and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.pptJIT KUMAR GUPTA
 
AI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - Morgenbooster
AI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - MorgenboosterAI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - Morgenbooster
AI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - Morgenbooster1508 A/S
 
Niintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptx
Niintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptxNiintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptx
Niintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptxKevinYaelJimnezSanti
 
Piece by Piece Magazine
Piece by Piece Magazine                      Piece by Piece Magazine
Piece by Piece Magazine CharlottePulte
 
Karim apartment ideas 01 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 01 pppppppppppppppKarim apartment ideas 01 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 01 pppppppppppppppNadaMohammed714321
 
10 must-have Chrome extensions for designers
10 must-have Chrome extensions for designers10 must-have Chrome extensions for designers
10 must-have Chrome extensions for designersPixeldarts
 
How to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AI
How to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AIHow to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AI
How to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AIyuj
 
simpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdf
simpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdfsimpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdf
simpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdfLucyBonelli
 
Map of St. Louis Parks
Map of St. Louis Parks                              Map of St. Louis Parks
Map of St. Louis Parks CharlottePulte
 

Recently uploaded (20)

General Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptx
General Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptxGeneral Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptx
General Knowledge Quiz Game C++ CODE.pptx
 
Color Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 Studio
Color Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 StudioColor Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 Studio
Color Theory Explained for Noobs- Think360 Studio
 
Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...
Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...
Giulio Michelon, Founder di @Belka – “Oltre le Stime: Sviluppare una Mentalit...
 
group_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdf
group_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdfgroup_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdf
group_15_empirya_p1projectIndustrial.pdf
 
world health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbb
world health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbbworld health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbb
world health day 2024.pptxgbbvggvbhjjjbbbb
 
Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025
Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025
Top 10 Modern Web Design Trends for 2025
 
guest bathroom white and blue ssssssssss
guest bathroom white and blue ssssssssssguest bathroom white and blue ssssssssss
guest bathroom white and blue ssssssssss
 
10 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 2024
10 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 202410 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 2024
10 Best WordPress Plugins to make the website effective in 2024
 
Iconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing services
Iconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing servicesIconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing services
Iconic Global Solution - web design, Digital Marketing services
 
guest bathroom white and bluesssssssssss
guest bathroom white and bluesssssssssssguest bathroom white and bluesssssssssss
guest bathroom white and bluesssssssssss
 
Karim apartment ideas 02 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 02 pppppppppppppppKarim apartment ideas 02 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 02 ppppppppppppppp
 
Making and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.ppt
Making and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.pptMaking and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.ppt
Making and Unmaking of Chandigarh - A City of Two Plans2-4-24.ppt
 
AI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - Morgenbooster
AI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - MorgenboosterAI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - Morgenbooster
AI and Design Vol. 2: Navigating the New Frontier - Morgenbooster
 
Niintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptx
Niintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptxNiintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptx
Niintendo Wii Presentation Template.pptx
 
Piece by Piece Magazine
Piece by Piece Magazine                      Piece by Piece Magazine
Piece by Piece Magazine
 
Karim apartment ideas 01 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 01 pppppppppppppppKarim apartment ideas 01 ppppppppppppppp
Karim apartment ideas 01 ppppppppppppppp
 
10 must-have Chrome extensions for designers
10 must-have Chrome extensions for designers10 must-have Chrome extensions for designers
10 must-have Chrome extensions for designers
 
How to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AI
How to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AIHow to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AI
How to Empower the future of UX Design with Gen AI
 
simpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdf
simpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdfsimpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdf
simpson-lee_house_dt20ajshsjsjsjsjj15.pdf
 
Map of St. Louis Parks
Map of St. Louis Parks                              Map of St. Louis Parks
Map of St. Louis Parks
 

Building Digital Cathedrals

  • 1. UX Professionalism Building tomorrows digital cathedrals Note: This is an abridged version of the history of architecture and the history of user experience design, to fit into a 45 minute presentation.
  • 2. The building industry remained unchanged for 1000’s of years (In the most part) the building industry remained unchanged for 1000’s of years.
  • 3. Unskilled labour gave way to skilled artisans Unskilled labour gave way to skilled artisans. As buildings became more complex, practitioners began to specialise.
  • 4. Modern city living created ever more complexity Modern city living created even more complexity.
  • 5. As wood gave way to stone Master Masons rose to power Medieval buildings were built by large teams of masons, under the guidance of a master mason. The master mason was the most senior and experienced mason and would be in charge of directing the other masons. To become a master mason you would have to apprentice under a master mason for many years before you were ready to work o your own. However rather than having a “grand plan” medieval cathedrals were architecturally a bit of a mess, built in a very ad hoc way.
  • 6. The renaissance heralded an age of wealth, beauty and scientific knowledge And masons started learning more about science and engineering. As well as study the building styles and techniques of ancient rome and greece. 17th century Italian architect Francesco Borromini (considered by some as one of the first professional architects) had a library of over 1,000 books.
  • 7. Buildings rose in complexity Buildings rose in complexity and these buildings needed a new breed of designer.
  • 8. Master masons became architects and the field of Architecture was born So the master masons began to be overtaken by a new profession. Building designers like Sir Christopher Wren, who wanted to bring a more systematised and scientific approach to buildings. and so in the 17th and 18th century the modern field of architecture was born. It’s interesting to note that architect comes from the greek arkhi (cheif) and tekton (builder). It’s also worth pointing out that until modern times there wasn’t a distinction between architect and engineer. In fact “architects” weren’t part of any guild (unlike Masons) and were often only given their titles because of their writings.
  • 9. Modern architects co-ordinate the design process Ultimately architects are hybrid designers bought in to co-ordinate the process of designing a building. They are also responsible for the vast majority of the built environment we live in today. With small projects, the architect may have enough skills to do the majority of the design work themselves, handing over to an engineer to implement. Some design-build architecture firms will do it all, but they are often looked down on by the industry as generalists. For big projects they need to rely on a team of people with different specialisms.
  • 10. We see architects as a well defined profession but modern architecture is multi-disciplinary Building  technologist Architectural  history Structural  engineer Planing  regula<ons Project  manager CAD Sustainability Materials  expert Quan<ty  surveying Concept  drawing Dra/ing Mechanical  engineer Construc<on  manager Design Urban  planning Accessibility Environmental    law Interior  design Planning  and  zoning Environmental  psychology Electrical  engineer Although for some reason we rarely see articles or online discussions forcing architects to define exactly what architecture is. Possibly because we’ve all been born into a world of architects so assume that somebody knows what it is they do. But in the mid 17th century, while there were many people calling themselves architects, the exact professional responsibility of the architect wasn’t precisely determined. And even today there is a lot of discussion around the philosophical aspects or architecture.
  • 11. Architecture schools were created to teach these specialisms Architecture isn’t art, engineering or design, but a culmination of all three. As such, in order to manage standards and quality, professional organisations like the architectural association were formed in 1857. It was also necessary to create dedicated schools in order to teach such a specialised subject.
  • 12. The history of web design is similar We can see a similar evolution when we look at the profession of web design.
  • 13. We started off as generalists Web  design Web  design Web  design Web  design Web  design Web  design Web  design Web  design The industry started off mostly staffed by passionate hobbyists and generalists like myself. We all did a bit of visual design, a bit of HTML and a bit of CGI programming.
  • 14. However as digital products became more complicated However 20 years later, the digital products we’re designing have become increasingly complicated. It was no longer possible for one person to retain all the knowledge and skills necessary to design a large-scale digital product.
  • 15. Many started to specialise Web  design Design  educa<on Responsive  design Mobile  gaming Accessibility User  Experience Web  design Icon  design Many of us started to specialise.
  • 16. We undertook our own renaissance We undertook our own mini renaissance. As an active design profession we started to explore existing and related disciplines like Human Factors and HCI to help us understand how people could better interact with web technology. We also started to explore library sciences to understand how to manage and categorise large amounts of information. These two fields slowly morphed into Usability, Interaction Design and Information Architecture.
  • 17. Don Norman popularised the term User Experience in the 90s Don Norman popularised the term user experience in the early 90s. The idea being that whenever we interact with a product or service it results in some kind of experience. This was an idea that encompassed traditional HCI thinking but also extended it, to cover all the aspects of a product or service as perceived by it’s users. Of course you can’t actually design the way somebody experiences a product or service, and I think this is one of the big mistakes novices make when they get into UX design. However it is possible to influence it in certain directions. In the late 90s, a group of largely west coast designers started to think about digital design in a much more holistic fashion. And the field of user experience design was born.
  • 18. Defining the dammed thing If you go to UX conferences or follow any “UX people”, you may notice that there’s a habit of trying to continuously define UX. This may give external observers or new entrants to the industry the idea UX isn’t a well understood thing. That couldn’t be further from the truth. UX designers who have been in the industry for any length of time have a good understating of their practice. They’ve read the books and papers, attended the conferences, listened to the podcasts and explained what they do to colleagues and clients a thousand times. However UX practitioners are very analytical and, in an emerging and constantly changing industry, are constantly refining the way they present themselves to the world. So a lot of the discussion around “defining the dammed thing” is to inform new entrants to the field, who read a smashing magazine article on usability testing once and now think that they are user experience designers. I suspect the architecture world went through very similar thing and to this day you’d probably struggle to get a room full or architects to define and agree to a thorough definition of the practice, just as you would a group of UX designers.
  • 19. The elements of user experience In 2000, Jesse James Garrett attempted to explain this growing field in a diagram (and later a short book) entitled The Elements of User Experience. [explain diagram] It may seem like a very simplistic diagram, but it’s still the mental model that most user experience practitioners have to this day. Now if you look at the process outlined, most digital teams already had somebody highly experienced in visual design, information design and possibly interface design, so this wasn’t a new role they needed to create. However only a few large organisations like the BBC had dedicated Information Architects and usability specialists. And even then, they tended to be few and far between. So for mid sized teams, somebody had to take on these roles. Sometimes it was the project manager, producer or BA. Sometimes the designers or developers. And if you were lucky enough to have a dedicated IA, they would end up finding themselves doing research, usability testing and interaction design. It became increasingly difficult for these people to do the extra work that was now being thrown at them, and still maintain their day job. So people started to specialise, and the name they settled on was user experience design.
  • 20. Dan Saffer’s UX diagram Back in 2006, Dan Saffer created this diagram in an attempt to outline the overlapping and competing elements that make up user experience design. As you can see from this (and many other diagrams) User Experience design encompasses usability, information architecture, communication design and interaction design. To be considered a user experience designer, you need to have a working knowledge of all these fields, and depth in at least a couple. Similarly a user experience deign agency is made up of experts in these particular areas. He’s updated it since to encompass fields outside of digital design. Like engineering and architecture. Personally I’m not a fan of the inflation of user experience design to cover all forms of “experience”. We’ve got existing fields of practice like “service design” which covers this well. So I personally like to consider UX design purely as a form of digital design.
  • 21. The duality of UX A job Specialised agency A field of practice The natural result of design The way people perceive a product/service So one of the problems with user experience is that it’s not one thing, but multiple things. It’s the way people perceive a product as in “that was a terrible experience”. It’s also the natural output of the design process. So we started seeing a lot of regular designers changing their titles to “user experience design” because hey, I influence the user experience also. UX design is a well understood field of practice that includes all the sub fields I previously mentioned. It’s something that a specific department or agency can specialise in. Just as they could specialise in development of graphic design. It’s also a persons job. Typically defined as somebody that does a mix of research, usability, IA and interaction design. But typically not visual design.
  • 22. Todays digital cathedrals Around 2006, UX started to become a recognised term and even a job title in the UK. By 2009 it was all the rage and seen as the hot new thing. Today UX designers are in big demand and and the vast majority of modern digital cathedrals will have been designer by UX designers. However this demand has caused a bit of a boom.
  • 23. The UX Hype Cycle At the same time more traditional we designers started becoming familiar with the term and many changed their names to UX designers (because there was demand and because it could earn more money). The more committed ones even signed onto UX related courses like the ergonomics course at UCL. Suddenly the market was flooded by folks that didn’t have much experience in UX. Prices started shooting up while quality started dropping. So while companies were reaching the peak of inflated expectations, agencies like mine were hitting the trough of disillusionment. Many felt that UX had become a tainted term and started distancing themselves from the term.
  • 24. Big design up front Those of our industry who cut our teeth in the late 90s and early naughties had learnt their craft in large organisations with very formal processes. The old guard were super experienced but really stuck in their ways. Traditional UX people tend to be heavily weighted towards the IA and Usability side of the spectrum. The IA folks are incredibly analytical and ridged. They love drawing "boxes and arrows" and producing reams and reason of documentation. This was perfect when designing very large, mission critical systems, but wasn’t necessarily flexible enough to cope with the new products coming their way. I’ve worked with several old school, institutional UX people before. They are less architect and more draftsperson. The usability folks weren’t any better. They were great an analysing problems, but many lacked the Design abilities to come up with good solutions.
  • 25. Lean UX So in the last couple of years the start-up industry have been pushing back with lean UX and agile UX. They wanted to do away with all the rigidity and formality of their predecessors and use a lightweight, informal process instead. This has some real benefits as you’re able to cut out a lot of the cruft and make improvements quickly. Perfect for poorly funded projects. So why spend months doing research and creating stacks of wireframes, when a few quick sketches could do? This is a great sentiment, but isn’t without it’s problems. Lean and agile UX has put the tools and language in the hands of amateurs. And I think this is largely a good thing, as UX is a team problem. However without the experts to know which tools to use when, a lot of the solutions we’re seeing are far too shallow and misguided. So I’m seeing lots of start-ups trying to adopt so called “agile UX practices” without the benefit of an expert, and failing badly. So a lot of these lean UX people have a very shallow understanding of UX and don’t know when they should and when they shouldn’t cut things out. This can lead to significant efficiency as they struggle to solve design problems that would be
  • 26. The UX professional I believe that we live in a world where both the old guard and new guard have a place. However I also believe there is a middle ground. The old pros need to adopt lighter weight practices while maintaining their deep knowledge and discipline The new guard need to start to specialise and become more professional. Design is a targeted activity, but with the right skills in your team it’s possible to do the work of significantly more people.
  • 27. UX as a modern design profession In his 1933 book, the professions, Carr Saunders stated that a profession has 5 aspects. • the foundation of a voluntary association • the exclusion of unqualified persons • a development of codes of conduct • a system of tests and examinations • and, finally, the control over relevant educational institutions
  • 28. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user Most organisations have somebody to represent the needs of the business, the needs of the technology department and the needs of sales and marketing. Rarely do they have anybody that represents the needs of their customers and users. So in most situations, this will be your job.
  • 29. Get out of the building Get out of the building. To do this you’re going to need to get out of the building and talk to real users. It may seem obvious and it may seem scary, but it’s very easy to do and doesn’t take a lot of resource. We’re talking about a few days worth of user interviews. Maybe a usability test. Maybe a quick user survey. Doesn’t take much to understand the user. The you can use techniques like user personas to help focus the organisation on their users needs
  • 30. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business However we also need to be pragmatic. Some designers take being the voice of the user too far, and forget that in most instances they are working for a business that also has needs, some of which may not always be served by understanding the needs of the user.
  • 31. Talk to the business So you have to spend time getting to know the organisation and the individuals. That doesn’t mean that you’re always going to do what the business wants. But you do need to understand what that is. At the end of the day, UX design is about balancing these two needs.
  • 32. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm
  • 34. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics
  • 35. Don’t forget the fundamentals of UX design. Usability. IA. Interaction design. If you don’t have these basics, none of the advanced still will be of much use.
  • 36. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics 5. Pick the right tool for the job
  • 37. Become tools experts The question isn’t, “which prototyping tool should I use?” You need to master as many tool as possible, understand the strangest and weaknesses of each, and know when to use them. So get to know Visio, Omnigraffle, Axure and even Balsamiq. However also make paper prototypes, try keynote, learn HTML/CSS and try video
  • 38. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics 5. Pick the right tool for the job 6. There's no high or low fidelity, just correct fidelity.
  • 39. Use the lowest fidelity tool you need This is one of the fantastic learning from Agile. These design artefacts are essentially communication tools. Get to know the team and the organisation you were working with and present them with the lowest level fidelity required to communicate intent. If you’re co-located with an agile team, this could be a conversation round a whiteboard, a paper sketch or an “animatic” video demo. The less time you spend documenting, the more time you will be spent solving design problems. However if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail. So if you’re working with a very conservative organisation, the stakeholders may need to see high fidelity prototypes to fully understand what you’re proposing. Similarly with remote or inexperienced dev teams, you’ll probably find yourself doing a lot more documentation than you’d like. But this is part of your job.
  • 40. Learn to... Sketch Learn to sketch.
  • 41. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics 5. Pick the right tool for the job 6. There's no high or low fidelity, just correct fidelity. 7. Be open and transparent
  • 42. Communication is a design problem Far too many designers want to spend all of their time designing. And far too many agencies only budget for the time it takes to create deliverables. However there’s no point crafting the perfect design if it never gets adopted. Organisation are a design problem themselves. Great designers understand this and use their people skills to make sure that the organisation understands what they have been designing and why.
  • 43. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics 5. Pick the right tool for the job 6. There's no high or low fidelity, just correct fidelity. 7. Be open and transparent 8. Work across disciplines
  • 44. Production line thinking Industrial age thinking has encouraged us to do discreet and specialist tasks before passing them on to the next person in the production line. This process is easier to manage but doesn’t take into count modern day knowledge work.
  • 45. Cross functional pairing We need to get more used to breaking out of our silos and working with other team members. One way to do this is through “cross functional pairing”. At the start of most of our project our UX designers and visual designers work together. This could be with the UX designer setting up and running interviews and the visual designer taking sketch notes. It could be the pair of them working together to sketch out a new process flow. Similarly our UX designers and front end developers will often work together prototyping solutions. By working together they get to input their own skills and abilities. This is one way of encouraging interested designers and developers to contribute their UX knowledge without feeling that they have to become UX designers themselves. User experience is everybody’s responsibility and design is a team game. All designers should care about UX, but that doesn’t mean they’re user experience designer. All developers should care about UX, but that doesn’t mean they’re UX developers. On projects of a certain size, a dedicated User Experience professional is needed to co- ordinate these activities.
  • 46. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics 5. Pick the right tool for the job 6. There's no high or low fidelity, just correct fidelity. 7. Be open and transparent 8. Work across disciplines 9. Be a design facilitator
  • 47. Good designers are facilitators Design is no-longer about creative individuals coming up with their own solutions and imposing them on a company or product. It’s about using your interpersonal skills to create environments and activities where the whole team can contribute their good ideas. Why have one mind working on the problem for a month when you can have 10 minds working on the same problem for a day? It’s then your job to examine, sift, evaluate and hone these ideas into something of value. In most cases the solution will simply present itself once you’ve had time to assemble all the pieces. So I think the ability to run interviews and workshops is the most important skill a UX person can have. This is a high level consultancy skill that most designers don’t feel comfortable leading.
  • 51. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics 5. Pick the right tool for the job 6. There's no high or low fidelity, just correct fidelity. 7. Be open and transparent 8. Work across disciplines 9. Be a design facilitator 10. Strive for mastery
  • 52. 10,000 Hours Malcom Gladwell looked at concert musicians and realised that to become a maestro you needed around 10,000 hours of practice and experience before you stop analysing your playing and instead internalise it and do it naturally. He looked at other fields and it looked like many of them also required 10,000 hours of practice and repetition to become competent. 10,000 hours works out roughly as 10 years of work. It’s important to note that this does need to be 10 years of unique experience, not one year repeated 10 times. However considering the general work hours we do in this industry, and the amount of stuff people do in their own time, really dedicated people can probably become experts in 5 years.
  • 53. UX professional charter 1. Be the voice of the user 2. Respect the needs of the business 3. Do no harm 4. Don't forget the basics 5. Pick the right tool for the job 6. There's no high or low fidelity, just correct fidelity. 7. Be open and transparent 8. Work across disciplines 9. Be a design facilitator 10. Strive for mastery My 10 steps to becoming a true UX pro. These aren’t the only ones so I’m sure you can find plenty more.