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4/29/15 Classroom Learning Labs Webinar Presentation

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4/29/15 Classroom Learning Labs Webinar Presentation

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4/29/15 Classroom Learning Labs Webinar Presentation

  1. 1. Building a Collaborative Community through Classroom Learning Labs Teresa McDougall and Dr. Dorothy VanderJagt
  2. 2. Changing the Culture of Classrooms, Buildings, and Districts Through Classroom Learning Labs The Ripple Effect………………….. Teresa McDougall and Dr. Dorothy VanderJagt @tmcdicoach @dvanderj
  3. 3. What are some elements of collaboration you believe are needed for students to achieve and thrive?
  4. 4. What are some elements of collaboration you believe are needed for educators to achieve and thrive?
  5. 5. What are elements of professional development you value?
  6. 6. Traditional form of Professional Development Compared to Classroom Learning Labs Classroom Learning Labs: ● Relationship is peer-peer ● Teacher reflects, chooses area for professional growth, ● Focuses on student learning and evidence of the learning ● Facilitator and colleagues follow up with host and guest educators to coach and collaborate ● CHOICE Traditional Form: ● Relationship is expert-novice ● Expert/supervisor evaluates, areas for discussion ● Focuses on teacher actions ● Generally one time session
  7. 7. The outcome of powerful conversations regarding instructional practice results in change and adjustment in teacher practice resulting in increased student achievement.
  8. 8. Schools with professional collaboration exhibit relationships and behaviors that support quality work and effective instruction, including the following: ● More complex problem-solving and extensive sharing of craft knowledge ● Stronger professional networks to share information ● Greater risk-taking and experimentation (because colleagues offer support and feedback) ● A richer technical language shared by educators in the school that can transmit professional knowledge quickly ● Increased job satisfaction and identification with the school ● More continuous and comprehensive attempts to improve the school, when combined with school-level improvement efforts (see Fullan and Hargreaves, 1991, for an excellent review)
  9. 9. Teachers and administrators spend time observing each other, and they instruct each other in the craft of teaching through formal and informal demonstrations. Collegial environments favor in-depth problem solving and planning. Interactions among staff and administrators foster more successful staff development, ongoing refinement of instruction, and improved teaching. Schools with Strong Collegial Orientations
  10. 10. As Susan Johnson (1990) found in her study of teachers and their work: The teachers made it clear that continuing collegial interaction benefits both them and their students. It sustains them through difficult times. It deepens their understanding of subject matter and pedagogy, supplies them with novel approaches, and allows them to test and compare practices. It encourages cooperative approaches to school change. It promotes high professional standards and a more coherent instructional experience for children. (p. 178)
  11. 11. Key aspect of collaborative cultures is the teachers' sense of efficacy - "the extent to which a teacher believes that he or she has the capacity to affect student learning" (Ashton, Burr and Crocker, 1984, p. 29). -Teachers with a high sense of efficacy believe that their efforts and expertise will have more impact on student learning than such external variables as parental support, class size, student motivation, and student socioeconomic background (Smylie, 1988; Rosenholtz, 1989).
  12. 12. In what ways do you have or support collaboration in your classroom, building, or district?
  13. 13. Structures and Activities That Support Collaboration When staff have more opportunities to collaborate in activities that are positive, self- directed, and important to them, a culture of collaboration is more likely to develop (see Little, 1982; Fullan and Hargreaves, 1989).
  14. 14. Building Collaboration Across the Building, District, and County 1. Reflective dialogue. 2. De-privatization of practice 3. Collective focus on student learning 4. Collaboration 5. Shared norms and values
  15. 15. Social and human resources to enhance professional community ● Openness to improvement -- support for risk taking ● Trust and respect -- teachers honored for their expertise ● Cognitive skill base -- effective teaching based on expertise in the knowledge and skills of teaching ● Supportive leadership -- focused on shared purpose, continuous improvement, and collaboration ● Socialization -- The school culture must encourage positive behaviors and discourage negative ones, in a daily process aimed at working toward the school vision and mission.
  16. 16. The Goal of the CLL is to Develop More Reflective Practitioners “It is a well-accepted fact among educators that what a teacher does in the classroom has a direct effect on student achievement.” (Nye, Konstantopoulos, & Hedges, 2004)
  17. 17. A number of researchers have reported results that support professional development that “is situated in practice, is ongoing, promotes collaborative inquiry and critical discourse, and is focused on improving student learning.” (Mast & Ginsberg, 2010, p. 257) (Ball & Cohen, 1999; Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 1999; Darling-Hammond & McLaughlin, 1999; Lyons & LaBoskey, 2002) “Effective professional development for teachers should help them “explore the upsides and downsides of experience, making their practice transparent and their knowledge public in the presence of others.” (Cheryl Craig and Margaret Olson 2002 p. 117)
  18. 18. What are some ways the professional development you provide or have experienced, encourages teachers to develop a habit of thinking to be more reflective in their own practices?
  19. 19. What is the Classroom Learning Lab? Professional Learning created and provided for Educators by Educators that has a ripple effect on teaching and learning
  20. 20. What are the Adopted Protocols? 1. Pre-Lesson Coaching Conversation 2. CLL: Pre Brief Classroom Observation DeBrief-Collaborative Conversations 3. Follow Up: Coach or Facilitator follows up on the goals stated by participants.
  21. 21. Instructional Dialogue The more we have collaborative conversation, we realize they are like layers of an onion.
  22. 22. Developing the CLL A teacher must have a general idea of what constitutes effective teaching. Growing a teacher’s domain knowledge so they know what strategies and behaviors are generally effective in their areas of expertise, while developing the practice to grow more effective strategies to meet the needs of their students.
  23. 23. Impact on the Classroom Culture Abby’s Reflection on her own instruction and student learning. “Increased Classroom or Student Dialogue” “Questioning to get to students thinking” “Use of Formative Assessments to make instructional decisions” “Beginning to become aware of some of the subtleties going on the classroom” “Use of multiple cooperative and collaborative strategies and groupings.
  24. 24. The CLL has impacted my teaching and student learning by helping me find the areas that I am doing well in and those areas that I need to improve. Collaborating with other teachers has also given me a wealth of ideas and knowledge. It also fosters teachers to want to collaborate more, which is an ideal way to grow in our profession. Students are engaged and eager to learn. (Michele Stutzky, Teacher, Grandville Public Schools) Impact on the Classroom Culture
  25. 25. Impact on the Building Culture ● Increased interest in participation in learning from colleagues ● Meaningful conversation around instructional thinking that probably wouldn't have happened ● Growing in our ability to provide high quality insight ● Building leadership capacity in the teaching ranks ● Helped our district align in a common area ● Brings value to the craft of teaching-seems we honor the decisions/moves a teacher makes because there is a pre-brief and debrief platform where they defend/justify their thinking (Michelle Krynicki, Director of Curriculum and Instruction, Godwin Heights 2015) Theresa’s thoughts on the impact CLL has had on her building.
  26. 26. Impact on the Building Culture We are seeing the CLL evolve. Unique collaborative learning models reflecting the desires of our teachers are starting to develop. We have noticed more teacher teams collaborating within schools (even some outside of their own school in cross-grade teams) to improve instruction in a variety of content areas. The collaborative spirit is growing. (Michelle Becker, Instructional Coach, Forest Hills Public Schools 2015)
  27. 27. Impact on the County Culture ● Teachers focus on teaching and learning ○ Implementation of the standards ○ Innovative ideas ○ Inquiry ○ Implementation of new curriculum ○ Seeking feedback ○ Student evidence of learning ● Developing curriculum and resources ○ Cross collaboration ● Administrators share strengths and weaknesses ○ Their curriculum, student data, or needs of teachers-areas they would like to develop
  28. 28. Impact on the County Culture Cross districts and county Lines CLL Cross district sharing of ideas and resources Collaboration on curriculum, resources, instructional practices, innovative ideas.
  29. 29. Teacher Reflections on the CLL Professional Learning Experience ● “Being a member of the group has pushed me to grow as a teacher. Also, it has pushed me to look more closely at the Instructional Model. I have thought much more about why I do what I do in the classroom. Getting ideas from other teachers and being able to talk together is incredibly valuable.” ● “It pushes me to the next level of instruction. It encourages me to take risks and be reflective on my teaching. I have taken a piece of every members lesson and used it in my own classroom.” ● “Thank you so much for this opportunity! I’m so happy that I took a chance and said yes. :)”
  30. 30. Impact on Student Achievement One Middle School teacher shared after participating in a CLL where the host teacher modeled scaffolded questioning in her class dialogue to get to student deeper thinking. After a month of implementing more questioning and providing students more opportunities to share thinking, he noticed an increase in student test scores by 15%-20%.
  31. 31. In what ways do the CLL compare to what you envision for your colleagues? What are you wondering about? What questions might you have?
  32. 32. Resources for you to access http://cllicoach.weebly.com/ @tmcdicoach @dvanderj
  33. 33. The Literature Reflecting on Teaching and Learning ● Peer mediation: ● Communities of practice (Wenger, 2014) ● Reflection-in-action (Schon, 1983) ● Progressive discourse (Wells, 2000) ● Peer coaching (Joyce & Showers, 2002) ● Expert mediation ● Responsive and directive coaching (Ippolito 2009) ● Student-centered coaching (Sweeney, 2011) ● Cognitive Coaching (Costa & Garmston, 2002) ● Video mediation ● Video clubs in Mathematics teacher noticings (Sherrin, 2011)
  34. 34. Research to Support Our Work Cambourne, B. (1995). Toward an educationally relevant theory of literacy learning: Twenty years of inquiry. The Reading Teacher, 49(3), 182-190. DuFour, R. & Eaker, R. (1998). Professional learning communities at work: Best practices for enhancing student achievement. Bllomington, IN: National Education Service. Houk, L, (2010). Demonstrating teaching in a lab classroom. Educational Leadership, 67. International Reading Association (2010). Standards for Reading Professionals. Retrieved March 26, 2013 from: http://www.reading.org/General/CurrentResearch/Standards/ProfessionalStandards2010.aspx Lacina, J. & Block, C.C. (2011). What matters most in distinguished literacy teacher education programs? Journal of Literacy Research. 43(4), 319-351.
  35. 35. Marker, E. & D’Onfrio, A. (2010). A different kind of coaching: The professional preparation of graduate level reading specialists combining video coaching with concurrent feedback. College Reading Association Yearbook, 31, 95-112. Sweeney, D. (2010). Student-centered coaching: A guide for K-8 principals and coaches. Thousand Oaks, CA: Corwin. Tomlinson, C.A. & McTighe, J. (2006). Integrating differentiated instruction and understanding by design: Connecting content and kids. Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development: Alexandria, VA. Wenger, E. (c2007). Communities of practice: A brief introduction. Communities of practice. [http://www.ewenger.com/theory/. Accessed May 9, 2014. Zhang & Miller in R. Goldman, R. Pea, B. Barron & S. Derry (Eds.) (2007). Video research in the learning sciences. New York, NY: Routledge.
  36. 36. Building a Collaborative Community through Classroom Learning Labs Teresa McDougall and Dr. Dorothy VanderJagt Click here to provide feedback
  37. 37. Click here to register Going Paperless with Google Apps Kelly Kermode – Forest Hills Public Schools

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