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#dbw15 1
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building an
Audience
Part 1
Introduction
@arhomberg
@jellybooks
My Strange Accent
#dbw15 2
Copenhagen Innsbruck London
About Me
Founder
(2011 – now)
VP Content
(2009-2011)
Manager
(1998-2011)
Ph.D.
(1993-1998)
3
Workshop Agenda
9:00 – 10:30 a.m.
• Introduction
• Discovery Journeys
• Author Platform
• Social Media
Part I – Introducti...
1. SEO - Search Engine Optimization
2. PR – Publicity and Content Marketing
3. Co-op Merchandising
4. Paid Advertising
All...
Do Ask Questions!
Interrupt at any time!
• for clarification
• for more detail
• for any other questions
Part I – Introduc...
#dbw15 7
End of Part I
image credit: Paul Kudelka
#dbw15 8
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building an
Audience
Part 2
Discovery Paths
Lets bust a few myths:
1. People go in search of what to
read next (sometimes they do,
most of the time they don’t)
2. Peo...
What is discovery?
“Discovery is when as
readers we become
aware of a book, be it
the subject, story, plot,
title, author,...
What is discoverability?
As book marketers we are
able to reach suitable
readers directly or
indirectly (via others) and
m...
Book Industry Has Changed
ecommerce
abundanceself-publishing
ebooks
65% 30%
6% 32.8 million books
Part 2 – Discovery Journ...
Supply versus Demand
We live in an
Age of Abundance.
There Is No Alternative.
Almost Infinite Choice
is here to stay.
Part...
Marketing Funnel
Action
DesireDesire
InterestInterest
AwarenessAwareness
Step 1 – Awareness
oh, there is a new book out th...
Discover
Sample
(search reviews)
Buy
(download)
Read
(and finish!)
Share
(recommend)
Virtuous Cycle
A funnel needs constan...
Real Discovery is Complex
Jellybooks
widget
Google
library
indie
Amazon
BN
Kobo
Bookbub
free
sale
bundle
promo
Twitter
Pin...
Six Discovery Journeys
1. Serendipitous
2. Distributed
3. Social
4. Curated
5. Data-Driven
6. Incentivised
Part 2#dbw15 im...
Serendipitous Discovery
Browsing the “stacks”.
Accidentally stumbling over
a great book.
Small percentage of books
get dis...
Distributed Discovery
Picking up inspiration and
book samples in non-book
places.
Browsing images of
London for an upcomin...
Social Discovery
Good old word of mouth, but
increasingly amplified online.
Social happens on a global
scale thanks to ema...
Curated Discovery
Editorial Picks
Huge Impact (i.e.: NYT,
iBooks home page, Amazon
email promo, etc.).
Immensely difficult...
Data-Driven Discovery
Traditionally:
• Best-seller list (popularity)
Now, it’s personal:
• Data-driven recommendations
(ma...
Incentivised Discovery
Tactically using:
• Price
• Discounts
• Special sales
• Bundles
selectively to reach new
readers, p...
Search
1. Search is not discovery
When you are searching for an author or title you have, by definition already
discovered...
• Missing meta-data is like poison. It prevents
you from being discovered at all, because it
can render you invisible and ...
End of Part II
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
Part III#dbw15 27
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building an
Audience
Part 3
Author Platform
credit: comics.washing...
Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 28
Background Reading
‘Traction’
by Gabriel Weinberg & Justin Mares
jbks.co/Gabriel_Weinb...
Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 29
Lets bust a few myths:
All you need is a good book
A good book is a requirement, but
o...
Every Author’s Duty
1.Get their own URL
2.Create a homepage or blog
3.Start a reader mailing list (email)
4.Be active on 2...
Step 1
10x more professional, costs just ~ $10/year
1.Domain Registrar: Namecheap/GoDaddy
2.Make sure the URL is easy to r...
Step 2
Create a Tumblr
• Get started with {myURL}.tumblr.com
• Advanced option: create blog.{myURL}.com
Why Tumblr?
• Easi...
Step 2 XL
Homepage with Wordpress
• Hosting ca $10/month
• Wordpress theme $50-$300
• More effort, but many more
(design) ...
Step 3
Set-up a professional email list
- Responsive design (reading on mobile phones)
- Opt-in button, opt-out button, an...
Step 4
Set-up 2 social network profiles,
• Your social inbox: Facebook
• Text focused: Twitter, Goodreads
• Image Focused:...
Facebook Basics
1.Your Presence
• “Profile” = for personal friends (up to 5,000)
• “Page” = authors/publisher (no follower...
Twitter Basics
1. Create an avatar (an “egg” looks unprofessional)
2. Customize your profile!
• Don’t look boring
(boring ...
Engagement Basics
Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 38
• What the book is (going to be) about
• Book Background: Why? What?...
End of Part III
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building an
Audience
Part 4
Social Discovery
Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 40
Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 41
Background Reading
‘The Tipping Point’
by Malcolm Gladwell
jbks.co/1eaXyvE
‘Contagious...
Lets bust a few myths:
You need a social media guru.
Author should engage with readers.
Basic rules are fast and easy to l...
STEPPS to Social Success
1. Social Currency
• We share things that make us look good.
2. Triggers
• Top of mind, tip of to...
What goes viral?
1. It’s inherently un-predictable
• Social networks are “chaotic”.
2. Influencers
• They matter, but they...
Email
1. Email is a social network in its own right
• Many a joke or story still goes viral via email
2. Highest reliabili...
Email
How to build an email list? (I)
1. Sign-up button
• Put a sign-up button on your
blog, website, email, etc.
2. Use f...
Email
How to build an email list? (II)
3. Manage churn by not sending too much/boring email
• A list will only grow if mor...
Email use
1. Don’t be a used car salesman
2. Special occasions
• Cover reveals or
• Outstanding reviews (but sparingly)
• ...
Email mobile first!
Over 50% of email is now read on tablets
and smartphones, not PCs!
1. Use a responsive design for emai...
Email
Jellybooks Case Study (iPhone)
Example: single column responsive design for smartphones with bullet proof buttons
Pa...
Email
Jellybooks Case Study (iPad)
Example: two column responsive design with bullet proof buttons for tablets
Part IV – S...
Part III – Social Discovery#dbw14 52
Pinterest
A Book Browser’s Paradise
1. 3rd largest social network after Facebook & Tw...
Pinterest
Author Examples
• Jody Hedlund → http://www.pinterest.com/jodyhedlund
• Elizabeth Gilbert http://www.pinterest.c...
Pinterest
What is Pinterest
• image heavy network: great covers perform better
• Books should only be 10% of what you post...
Pinterest
Community Boards
Make use of community boards, as they are super-viral
• Readers can contribute
• Community boar...
Pinterest
Community Boards (example: Jellybooks – History Books)
Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 56
Pinterest
‘Enhanced Pins’
When you click on a pin,
you’re taken to the website
from which it was pinned.
That is true for ...
Pinterest
‘Enhanced Pins’
Adding a green sample button made visitors of the
Pinterest board 4x more likely to click on cov...
Case Study No. 2
Create a caption that captures attention
instead of just pinning a synopsis.
In this case, we noticed tha...
Case Study No. 2
Pinterest - Look what Amazon is doing!
Amazon old
Amazon new
Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 60
Twitter
Every publisher’s favourite network
1. Immensely popular with publishing insiders
2. Twitters is not a top network...
Twitter
Author Examples
1. Neil Gaiman @Neilhimself
2. Margaret Atwood @MargaretAtwood
3. Teju Cole @tejucole
4. Michael R...
Twitter
Twitter Cards
URL with correct
mark-up activates a
“Twitter Card”
Twitter Cards:
• Title of book
• Mini synopsis
•...
Twitter
Hashtags
1.Post sample of your books on:
• Fridays for #Fridayreads
• Sundays for #SampleSunday
2. Seek out other ...
Twitter
Gain followers
• Follow authors similar to yourself (same [sub]genre, etc.)
• Follow their reader, many may follow...
Facebook
World largest social network
1. No Facebook profile = not accessible to most readers
2. Use as “inbox” for fans a...
Facebook
How to use
1. Focus on engaging with your “super fans”
2. It is your most loyal readers who will spread
the word,...
Facebook
Competitions
The great strength of Facebook are competitions.
• For example hold a competition for a $100 Amazon
...
Facebook
Engaging
1. Facebook is a also a great place to promote and post
pictures and videos of author readings, conferen...
Other Social Networks
Only sign-up for what you will use
Fiction Focused
1. Goodreads
2. Wattpad
3. Library Thing
4. Googl...
End of Part IV
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 72
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building an
Audience
Part 5
Distributed Disc...
Lets bust a few myths:
1. Book Covers are obsolete
great cover art is very important for
online ebook discovery.
2. Great ...
Distributed Discovery
• Book blogs
• Traditional news sites
• Lifestyle sites
• Special interest sites
• wherever books ar...
Frictionless Discovery
Discover
(online)
Sample
(click link)
Buy
(download)
Read
(and finish!)
Share
(recommend)
Frictionl...
Links, Links, Links…
Convert browsers to samplers
Encourage bloggers, reviewers, journalists etc. to
include links to plac...
Links, Links, Links…
Solution 1: Amazon links
• Cannot link to Kindle sample directly, only product
page (bit too salesy f...
Links, Links, Links…
Solution 2: Sample link on your own homepage
Encourage bloggers, reviewers, journalists etc. to use d...
Links, Links, Links…
“Like book?
Download sample now,
and reader in peace later.”
• Caters to user’s “collector’s instinct...
Links, Links, Links…
Part IV – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 80
Solution 3: Widgets
6 different sizes with
and without cover...
Links, Links, Links…
Solution 3: Widgets
Discover
(online)
Sample
(downloaded)
Buy
(hooked)
Read
(and finish!)
Share
(reco...
Combining the physical and digital
• Low cost, but physical
• Straight-to-mobile with QR codes
• Can be handed out as digi...
Service Providers
Other Solution providers:
• Book2Look http://www.book2look.com
• Bookbuzzr http://www.bookbuzzr.com
• Bo...
End of Part V
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
#dbw15 85
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building an
Audience
Part 6
Visual Discovery
Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 86
Don’t Judge a Book by it’s Cover
Covers help us discover!
Window display of Daunt’s book shop on Marylebone High Street in London
Part VI – Visual Discover...
Browsing book covers is a joy!
travel section of Daunt’s book shop on Marylbone High Street in London
Part VI – Visual Dis...
Browsing covers online is a joy, too!
Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 89
Pinterest does it, too
http://www.pinterest.com/louisesblooms/books-i-want-to-read
Covers allow for easy browsing
Part VI ...
Great Cover Design
Some simple ONLINE rules
• Less text (title & author already displayed as caption)
• Have strong focal ...
Great Cover Design
Pull You In
‘101 Whiskies to Try before you Die’
by Ian Buxton
‘The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.’
by Ad...
Great Cover Design
Strong Focus Colour
‘The Witch’s Daughter’
by Paul Brackston
‘The Art of Immersion’
by Frank Rose
‘A Ho...
Great Cover Design
Tells a Story
‘Moonwalking With Einstein’
by Joshua Foer
‘Department of Speculation’
by Jenny Offill
‘L...
Cover Design Pitfalls
Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 95
Hardcover Trade paperback
Left cover works
very well online
and ...
Not So Great Cover Design
Great in print, but not online
‘The Bug’
by Ellen Ullman
‘The social citizen’
by Betsy Sinclair
...
End of Part VI
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
#dbw15 98
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building an
Audience
Part 7
Incentivised Discovery
Using Price & Promotions
Lets bust a few myths:
1. Amazon is the problem
It’s more a matter of careful channel
and price management.
2. Piracy is t...
Background Reading
‘Pricing on Purpose’
by Ronal J. Baker
jbks.co/1bSssGD
‘Free’
by Chris Anderson
jbks.co/1gUGoVU
‘The Cu...
Future of Book Pricing
1. Games have set an example
• Free is how you build an audience. Loyalty
comes first, monetization...
Pricing
• Benchmark against title in your genre/category, pricing
is becoming highly category dependent
• Who are your rea...
Price Promotions
• Best-seller list is one of the top ways of being
discovered
• How to break in:
• Heavy PR or hyper-vira...
Price Promotions
Cracking Amazon
‘Lets get Visible’
by David Gaughran
jbks.co/Kay8ow
Introduction to:
• Amazon’ sales rank...
Price Promotions
• Keep deal durations short (max 72 hours), deals expiring
soon more likely to be shared (sense of urgenc...
Price Promotions
• “flock to unlock” = discount code only sent out when a
minimum number of followers retweet the deal
(a ...
Price Promotions
• Typically 50% or more, else readers don’t care and
as result don’t share
• Never advertise absolute sav...
Beware the Book Hoarders
• When books drop below a certain
price point, readers start hoarding
• Unread books:
• are not r...
Book Fetish
The printed book will never
die, but its role may well
morph to a product for true
fans.
It’s not about “conte...
Go Premium
1. Limited edition super-premium hardbacks
• Target the super fans (5-20% of readership = Pareto rule)
• Key is...
Exclusivity Incentive
• Remembers STEPPS? (E = Emotion)
• Strong Tribal appeal = belonging to the “in-crowd”
• Increasing ...
Crowd-funding
• Crowd funding does not substitute for an advance
unless you are writing the desperately awaited
conclusion...
End of Part VII
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
#dbw15 114
Discovery &
Discoverability
Finding & Building
an Audience
Part 8
Lifecycle Marketing
Part VIII – Social Discovery#dbw15 115
Background Reading
‘Tribes’
by Seth Godin
jbks.co/1cFS7FY
‘Lean Analytics’
by A. Cr...
Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 116
Lets Bust a Few Myths:
It ends with the Book Launch
maybe for the publicist, but...
Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 117
Lifecycle Marketing
The conversation never stops
Continue engaging with readers
...
Write more…
The best lifecycle discoverability tool is
to write more books:
• It is easier to sell a new book to
your exis...
Grow The Mailing Lost
• CTA (Call-To-Action) buttons at the end of every
book to joining the mailing list
• Start segmenti...
Perma-free
The Power of Free
• Perma-free = permanently free
• Consider making the first book in a series free.
• A free b...
Bundles
Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 121
Tip: Bundles will have to be single
file (SKU) for most retailers
• Seri...
Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 122
Analytics
Google Analytics
Positive:
• It’s free
• It’s powerful
• Where is traf...
Analytics
Amazon Data
Positive:
• Use Vendor Central/KDP dashboard
• Correlate sales with marketing activities
• Use Amazo...
Analytics
Kindle Public Pages
Positive:
• Understand how people read your books
• What sections they highlight
• Do they f...
Data, Analytics & Algorithms
Our afternoon workshop with presentations by:
Perseus Book Group: social media monitoring
Net...
End of Part VIII
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
The End
for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
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DBW15 Workshop by Jellybooks on Book Discovery & Discoverabilty - Finding and Growing an Audience

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We live in an age of abundance. Over 1 million new books are published every year and that's just in the English language. In total more than 30 million books are available on Amazon to buy. The choice facing any reader is enormous.

How does an author or publisher make their book stand out and facilitate readers discovering them? This workshop gives a few tools and tips on how to make books more discoverable.

The slides are the omnibus version of an 8-part workshop at the Digital Book World workshop “Discovery & Discoverability – Finding and Growing an Audience” held at Hilton Midtown in New York City on Tuesday 13th January 2015.

Published in: Marketing
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DBW15 Workshop by Jellybooks on Book Discovery & Discoverabilty - Finding and Growing an Audience

  1. 1. #dbw15 1 Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 1 Introduction @arhomberg @jellybooks
  2. 2. My Strange Accent #dbw15 2 Copenhagen Innsbruck London
  3. 3. About Me Founder (2011 – now) VP Content (2009-2011) Manager (1998-2011) Ph.D. (1993-1998) 3
  4. 4. Workshop Agenda 9:00 – 10:30 a.m. • Introduction • Discovery Journeys • Author Platform • Social Media Part I – Introduction#dbw15 4 10:45 – 12:00 noon • Distributed Discovery • Visual Discovery • Incentivised Discovery • Lifecycle Marketing 10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Coffee break
  5. 5. 1. SEO - Search Engine Optimization 2. PR – Publicity and Content Marketing 3. Co-op Merchandising 4. Paid Advertising All these contribute to visibility and discoverability, but in this workshop we will not cover these strategies. Not Covered Part I – Introduction#dbw15 5
  6. 6. Do Ask Questions! Interrupt at any time! • for clarification • for more detail • for any other questions Part I – Introduction#dbw15 6
  7. 7. #dbw15 7 End of Part I image credit: Paul Kudelka
  8. 8. #dbw15 8 Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 2 Discovery Paths
  9. 9. Lets bust a few myths: 1. People go in search of what to read next (sometimes they do, most of the time they don’t) 2. People see, people buy (actually impulse buys are rare) 3. Readers don’t judge a book by its cover (well they do, all the time) 4. Google is a discovery engine (no it’s a search engine) 9
  10. 10. What is discovery? “Discovery is when as readers we become aware of a book, be it the subject, story, plot, title, author, characters or just the book cover.” Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 10 stone relief, Balliol College, Oxford
  11. 11. What is discoverability? As book marketers we are able to reach suitable readers directly or indirectly (via others) and make the readers aware of our titles, authors, story lines, topics or covers. Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 11
  12. 12. Book Industry Has Changed ecommerce abundanceself-publishing ebooks 65% 30% 6% 32.8 million books Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 12
  13. 13. Supply versus Demand We live in an Age of Abundance. There Is No Alternative. Almost Infinite Choice is here to stay. Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 13
  14. 14. Marketing Funnel Action DesireDesire InterestInterest AwarenessAwareness Step 1 – Awareness oh, there is a new book out there, maybe worth checking out Step 2 – Interest this looks like something I might actually want to read Step 3 – Desire I have heard so much about it, I should really give it a go Step 4 – Action decides to sample, buy, read, review and/or share book. Hurray! Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 14
  15. 15. Discover Sample (search reviews) Buy (download) Read (and finish!) Share (recommend) Virtuous Cycle A funnel needs constant feeding, but a virtuous cycle is self-sustaining. Cycle needs to be sustained though. Buying isn’t enough. Users have to read and recommend! Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 15
  16. 16. Real Discovery is Complex Jellybooks widget Google library indie Amazon BN Kobo Bookbub free sale bundle promo Twitter Pinterest Goodreads Facebook review Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 16
  17. 17. Six Discovery Journeys 1. Serendipitous 2. Distributed 3. Social 4. Curated 5. Data-Driven 6. Incentivised Part 2#dbw15 image: Zurich University law library
  18. 18. Serendipitous Discovery Browsing the “stacks”. Accidentally stumbling over a great book. Small percentage of books get discovered this way, but the emotional impact is high. Books covers play a large part in serendipity. Part 2#dbw15 Bendigo book store, Victoria, Australia
  19. 19. Distributed Discovery Picking up inspiration and book samples in non-book places. Browsing images of London for an upcoming trip to London, may inspire us to sample a book set in London for example… Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 19
  20. 20. Social Discovery Good old word of mouth, but increasingly amplified online. Social happens on a global scale thanks to email, Facebook, Pinterest, Twitter. Aim to get covers, quotes and emotions included in the conversations. Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 20 Marck Zuckerberg, CEO of Facebook
  21. 21. Curated Discovery Editorial Picks Huge Impact (i.e.: NYT, iBooks home page, Amazon email promo, etc.). Immensely difficult to influence. Often a follow-on to other channels that already work well. Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 21
  22. 22. Data-Driven Discovery Traditionally: • Best-seller list (popularity) Now, it’s personal: • Data-driven recommendations (machine-learning) a la Pandora or Netflix Part 2#dbw15 Goodreads recommendations
  23. 23. Incentivised Discovery Tactically using: • Price • Discounts • Special sales • Bundles selectively to reach new readers, preferably social influencers Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 23
  24. 24. Search 1. Search is not discovery When you are searching for an author or title you have, by definition already discovered the title or author, as in already being aware of it. You are already on the next rung of the marketing funnel: interest and/or desire 2. Discoverability Is the focus on the step beforehand. How do we make readers aware of our books, so that they when they search, they search for our books among the millions of other possibilities. 3. Category Search Is one of the few types of searches that serves a genuine discovery function, but if your you are not on Page 1 (thanks to good SEO), you are not visible. Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 24
  25. 25. • Missing meta-data is like poison. It prevents you from being discovered at all, because it can render you invisible and unfindable. • Some of the best meta-data (like ranking in best seller lists) is not under your control, but matters more to discoverability than almost any other factor • So stay calm, do your meta-data homework and lets move on. • This workshop is not about meta-data Role of ONIX • Good meta-data is essential, but not sufficient for discovery Part 2 – Discovery Journeys#dbw15 25
  26. 26. End of Part II for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
  27. 27. Part III#dbw15 27 Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 3 Author Platform credit: comics.washingtonpost.com
  28. 28. Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 28 Background Reading ‘Traction’ by Gabriel Weinberg & Justin Mares jbks.co/Gabriel_Weinberg ‘Let’s Get Visible’ by David Gaughran jbks.co/David_Gaughran
  29. 29. Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 29 Lets bust a few myths: All you need is a good book A good book is a requirement, but obscurity is far more likely, than overnight success. You need to be a geek Anybody can get the hang of it. The Retailer will do it Every author/publisher has to work on visibility for their title.
  30. 30. Every Author’s Duty 1.Get their own URL 2.Create a homepage or blog 3.Start a reader mailing list (email) 4.Be active on 2 social networks ‘HMTL & CSS’ by Jon Duckett jbks.co/Jon_Duckett Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 30
  31. 31. Step 1 10x more professional, costs just ~ $10/year 1.Domain Registrar: Namecheap/GoDaddy 2.Make sure the URL is easy to remember & type! 3.Use Google Apps to create @{yourURL}.com Get your own URL http://www.{yourURL}.com Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 31
  32. 32. Step 2 Create a Tumblr • Get started with {myURL}.tumblr.com • Advanced option: create blog.{myURL}.com Why Tumblr? • Easiest to set-up and use • Can be used as a basic homepage • So do NOT procrastinate! Start a Tumblr Blog Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 32
  33. 33. Step 2 XL Homepage with Wordpress • Hosting ca $10/month • Wordpress theme $50-$300 • More effort, but many more (design) options Homepage + Blog Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 33 ‘Create Your Own Website Using Wordpress In a Weekend by Alannah Moore jbks.co/Alannah_Moore
  34. 34. Step 3 Set-up a professional email list - Responsive design (reading on mobile phones) - Opt-in button, opt-out button, analytics, etc. Providers: • Mailchimp (free for first 2,000 subscribers) • Aweber, Constant Contact, Campaign Monitor, Vertical Response, etc. Create a Mailing list Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 34
  35. 35. Step 4 Set-up 2 social network profiles, • Your social inbox: Facebook • Text focused: Twitter, Goodreads • Image Focused: Pinterest, Tumblr, Instagram • Video Focused: YouTube, Vimeo, Vine Bulls-eye framework: focus on channels that create engagement! Create a Social Profile Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 35
  36. 36. Facebook Basics 1.Your Presence • “Profile” = for personal friends (up to 5,000) • “Page” = authors/publisher (no follower limit) • One per pseudonym/pen name • Do NOT create a page for each title 2.Engagement • For many readers Facebook = Fanmail inbox • Respond to every comment within 24 hours 3.Metrics • conversations matter, not likes! Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 36
  37. 37. Twitter Basics 1. Create an avatar (an “egg” looks unprofessional) 2. Customize your profile! • Don’t look boring (boring authors/publishers = boring books) • link to your blog or homepage in your profile • Upload a background 3. Get a “verified” tag, if possible. The Twitter Book by Tim O’Reilly and Sarah Milstein jbks.co/The_Twitter_Book Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 37
  38. 38. Engagement Basics Part III – Author Platform#dbw15 38 • What the book is (going to be) about • Book Background: Why? What? For whom? • Post quotes (look at Amazon Public Notes) • Wet the appetite of future readers • Don’t post salesy messages TIP: Curiosity is a powerful motivational driver
  39. 39. End of Part III for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
  40. 40. Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 4 Social Discovery Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 40
  41. 41. Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 41 Background Reading ‘The Tipping Point’ by Malcolm Gladwell jbks.co/1eaXyvE ‘Contagious’ by Jonah Berger jbks.co/1lYQ5Tw ‘Six Degrees’ by Duncan J. Watts jbks.co/19WIr6O ‘Everything is Obvious’ by Duncan J. Watts jbks.co/19VZSHO
  42. 42. Lets bust a few myths: You need a social media guru. Author should engage with readers. Basic rules are fast and easy to learn. Social Marketing is a silver bullet. It’s hard work and time consuming, but it’s (mostly) free. Authors can outsource to publisher. Readers want to engage with authors. Publishers are coaches & assistants. Need to cover every social network. Focus on those you actually enjoy. Do not create and then abandon profiles. Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 42
  43. 43. STEPPS to Social Success 1. Social Currency • We share things that make us look good. 2. Triggers • Top of mind, tip of tongue. 3. Ease for emotion • When we care, we share. 4. Public • Monkey sees, monkey does. 5. Practical Value • News you can use. 6. Stories • Information travels disguised as gossip. ‘Contagious’ by Jonah Berger jbks.co/1lYQ5Tw Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 43
  44. 44. What goes viral? 1. It’s inherently un-predictable • Social networks are “chaotic”. 2. Influencers • They matter, but they are not gatekeepers. Anybody can be the trigger. 3. Small Worlds • Its easier to go viral in a small, hyper- connected world. 4. Thresholds & Cascades • Virality depends on a critical mass for the trend not to die out. ‘Six Degrees’ by Duncan J. Watts jbks.co/19WIr6O Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 44
  45. 45. Email 1. Email is a social network in its own right • Many a joke or story still goes viral via email 2. Highest reliability for reaching recipients • follow basic rules of not triggering spam filters • test your subject lines 3. Messages are less likely to be overlooked • It might be ignored, but at least it’s seen 4. High conversion ratios • Superior to Facebook, Twitter and others 5. Easily forwarded • But pay attention to the STEPPS rules 6. Email is more “private” Email – the “secret” weapon! Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 45
  46. 46. Email How to build an email list? (I) 1. Sign-up button • Put a sign-up button on your blog, website, email, etc. 2. Use freebies, extras, competitions to get sign ups • Offer free novellas or short stories that spin-off from the book • Distribute free tickets to author readings • Hold competitions for free books, Amazon gift cards etc. source: www.hughhowey.com Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 46
  47. 47. Email How to build an email list? (II) 3. Manage churn by not sending too much/boring email • A list will only grow if more people join than leave • Some people will always leave, don’t be annoyed, it’s life 3. Put an unsubscribe link at the bottom of every email • In many countries this is a legal requirement • Readers are less likely to recommend you, if they feel trapped Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 47
  48. 48. Email use 1. Don’t be a used car salesman 2. Special occasions • Cover reveals or • Outstanding reviews (but sparingly) • TV appearances (and share the video thereafter) 3. Remember the STEPPS rules! • You can use 3rd party services to test subject lines 4. Analytics • Carefully monitor what causes subscribers to: • Open emails, click on links, forward, unsubscribe author Stephen King Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 48
  49. 49. Email mobile first! Over 50% of email is now read on tablets and smartphones, not PCs! 1. Use a responsive design for email 2. Use a service like Litmus to test how your emails will look like on different devices 3. KISS (Keep It Simple Stupid) is always a great strategy Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 49
  50. 50. Email Jellybooks Case Study (iPhone) Example: single column responsive design for smartphones with bullet proof buttons Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 50
  51. 51. Email Jellybooks Case Study (iPad) Example: two column responsive design with bullet proof buttons for tablets Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 51
  52. 52. Part III – Social Discovery#dbw14 52 Pinterest A Book Browser’s Paradise 1. 3rd largest social network after Facebook & Twitter • 70 million users 2. Ideal reading demographic • >65% female • Mostly 35-55 years old 3. Persistent visibility 1. Pinterest: days - weeks 2. Facebook: 30 minutes to 2 days 3. Twitter: 5-10 minutes 4. Great for engagement 1. Many users will re-pin a book tot their “books I want to read board
  53. 53. Pinterest Author Examples • Jody Hedlund → http://www.pinterest.com/jodyhedlund • Elizabeth Gilbert http://www.pinterest.com/lizgilbertpins • Hugh Howey http://www.pinterest.com/hughhowey • Laurie Halse Anderson http://www.pinterest.com/halseanderson • Ami McKay http://www.pinterest.com/sideshowami • Random House (USA) http://www.pinterest.com/randomhouse Publisher Examples Elizabeth Gilbert of ‘East, Pray, Love’ Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 53
  54. 54. Pinterest What is Pinterest • image heavy network: great covers perform better • Books should only be 10% of what you post • Great opportunity to post images that pull readers deeper into the “world” (cities, scenes, landscapes) • Make use of community boards, they’re super-viral • Have boards dedicated to your own reading showing your side as a “reader”, not just as an author/publishers • General bookish stuff Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 54
  55. 55. Pinterest Community Boards Make use of community boards, as they are super-viral • Readers can contribute • Community board appears on member’s profile • New users following board on their profile, also become your followers → very fast way to add followers • Contributions can provide great inspiration for your other boards and help you engage with readers Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 55
  56. 56. Pinterest Community Boards (example: Jellybooks – History Books) Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 56
  57. 57. Pinterest ‘Enhanced Pins’ When you click on a pin, you’re taken to the website from which it was pinned. That is true for both pins on the left, but which pin got more click-troughs? Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 57
  58. 58. Pinterest ‘Enhanced Pins’ Adding a green sample button made visitors of the Pinterest board 4x more likely to click on cover: → 4x more users downloading a sample Sample on their eReader or tablet = a critical step to get them hooked (and constant reminder of the book not yet bought) Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 58
  59. 59. Case Study No. 2 Create a caption that captures attention instead of just pinning a synopsis. In this case, we noticed that readers loved sharing the opening line of the book: “My name is Elizabeth Hawksmith, and my age is three hundred and eighty-four years. If you will listen, I will tale you a tale of witches...” Pinterest optimize captions TIP: Check out Kindle Public Pages or quotes shared on Twitter and Pinterest to find out what captures readers imagination and use in your own social marketing. Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 59
  60. 60. Case Study No. 2 Pinterest - Look what Amazon is doing! Amazon old Amazon new Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 60
  61. 61. Twitter Every publisher’s favourite network 1. Immensely popular with publishing insiders 2. Twitters is not a top network for readers sharing books 3. Great for sharing timely news as links • Author readings • Appearances on radio, TV etc. • Any mention in news articles etc. • Avoid being a used sales man and shouting “buy, buy, buy” 4. Include sample links to you book when appropriate 5. Stimulate conversations around your book Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 61
  62. 62. Twitter Author Examples 1. Neil Gaiman @Neilhimself 2. Margaret Atwood @MargaretAtwood 3. Teju Cole @tejucole 4. Michael Rosen @MichaelRosenYES 5. R.L. Stine @RL_Stine Neil Gaiman author and Twitter “celebrity”’ TIP: Twitter can be a colossal time sink for people who like writing. Allocate a dedicated time slot every day, i.e. ½ hour in the morning and ½ hour in the evening for Twitter. Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 62
  63. 63. Twitter Twitter Cards URL with correct mark-up activates a “Twitter Card” Twitter Cards: • Title of book • Mini synopsis • Cover • Link to more → a huge boost to discoverability. Readers 3x more likely to click on link. Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 63
  64. 64. Twitter Hashtags 1.Post sample of your books on: • Fridays for #Fridayreads • Sundays for #SampleSunday 2. Seek out other hashtags related to your book 3. Measure engagement with bit.ly (or jbks.co) links TIP: track links you put on Twitter to see what is creating click- troughs, RTs/Likes are a poor measure of engagement (you can use Bitly for link tracking) Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 64
  65. 65. Twitter Gain followers • Follow authors similar to yourself (same [sub]genre, etc.) • Follow their reader, many may follow you back, but don’t make the mistake of DM-ing them • Do not DM people to say “thanks for following” • Avoid “selling” and focus on engaging • Don’t be afraid to talk about topics you are passionate about even, if they do not relate to your book. • Post when events happen to which readers relate • When in doubt, 5 p.m. is best time for getting retweets Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 65
  66. 66. Facebook World largest social network 1. No Facebook profile = not accessible to most readers 2. Use as “inbox” for fans and readers to contact you 3. Marketing effectiveness has dramatically declined since introduction of Edgerank (85% of posts not displayed) 4. Number of likes does not matter at all (vanity number). What matters are conversations. Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 66
  67. 67. Facebook How to use 1. Focus on engaging with your “super fans” 2. It is your most loyal readers who will spread the word, make them care, make them passionate 3. Readers are more chat focused on Facebook than on Twitter or Pinterest. On Facebook it’s about conversations. ‘The Facebook Marketing Book’ by Dan & Allison Zarella jbks.co/16r6hqg Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 67
  68. 68. Facebook Competitions The great strength of Facebook are competitions. • For example hold a competition for a $100 Amazon gift card (or BN, Kobo, Indiebound, if they prefer – be flexible) in exchange for readers joining your mailing list, etc. • A “fan gate” (= “like to enter” is a waste of time, because likes don’t matter, you want shares) Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 68
  69. 69. Facebook Engaging 1. Facebook is a also a great place to promote and post pictures and videos of author readings, conferences, etc. 2. Encourage fans to post book-related pictures 3. Share fun bookish stuff, even if it is not directly related to you own book, but don’t get too personal (think of Facebook as being public) 4. Promote books you like from fellow authors/publishers: • It makes you look selfless • Readers appreciate great recommendations • authors/publishers you recommend may reciprocate Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 69
  70. 70. Other Social Networks Only sign-up for what you will use Fiction Focused 1. Goodreads 2. Wattpad 3. Library Thing 4. Google+ 5. Reddit 6. Instagram etc. Non-fiction Focused 1. Goodreads 2. Quora 3. Google+ 4. Linked-In 5. Slideshare 6. Disqus etc. Tip: check availability of usernames with namechk.com Part IV – Social Discovery#dbw15 70
  71. 71. End of Part IV for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
  72. 72. Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 72 Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 5 Distributed Discovery Cook & Book, Brussels (Belgium)
  73. 73. Lets bust a few myths: 1. Book Covers are obsolete great cover art is very important for online ebook discovery. 2. Great meta-data and you’re done Meta-data is a necessity, but does not contribute much to discoverability. 3. Categories are for librarians Category search is probably the top search for users to discover new books. 4. People will just go to Amazon Path form discovery to purchase needs to be as frictionless as possible. Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 73
  74. 74. Distributed Discovery • Book blogs • Traditional news sites • Lifestyle sites • Special interest sites • wherever books are mentioned online TIP: This can be fuelled with great PR, one of the traditional strengths of publishers. Good publicity work has lost none of its stellar value (but you already knew that). Books can be discovered in many contexts Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 74
  75. 75. Frictionless Discovery Discover (online) Sample (click link) Buy (download) Read (and finish!) Share (recommend) Frictionless discovery aids reader from point of discovery to sample with a simple click of the mouse. Sample links are usually preferable to buy links. Guide the reader in stages. Free is always an easier action to take than something that involves payment. Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 75
  76. 76. Links, Links, Links… Convert browsers to samplers Encourage bloggers, reviewers, journalists etc. to include links to place links or other calls-to action Sample links are superior to buy links Few browsers are instantly converted Not everybody wants to link to a single retailer Make your links trackable Part IV – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 76
  77. 77. Links, Links, Links… Solution 1: Amazon links • Cannot link to Kindle sample directly, only product page (bit too salesy for some) • Not everybody wants to link exclusively to Amazon • ebook users are locked into the Kindle ecosystem Part IV – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 77
  78. 78. Links, Links, Links… Solution 2: Sample link on your own homepage Encourage bloggers, reviewers, journalists etc. to use dedicated sample link Make sure that: • Have suitably formatted sample links (mark-up) • Host the samples in the cloud for ease of download • have buy links to a selection of shop destinations • track inbound links (Google Analytics will do) • create affiliate rewards for each link, to track conversion from sampling to buying Part IV – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 78
  79. 79. Links, Links, Links… “Like book? Download sample now, and reader in peace later.” • Caters to user’s “collector’s instinct” without requiring a major time commitment • Free and provides the reader with first 10% • Functionally works like a ‘tweet’ or ‘like’ button • Don’t take user away from site they are reading (making them much more attractive to site owner, than links) Solution 3: Widgets Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 79
  80. 80. Links, Links, Links… Part IV – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 80 Solution 3: Widgets 6 different sizes with and without cover copy & paste for professional users
  81. 81. Links, Links, Links… Solution 3: Widgets Discover (online) Sample (downloaded) Buy (hooked) Read (and finish!) Share (recommend) last page of sample… Link to buy Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 81
  82. 82. Combining the physical and digital • Low cost, but physical • Straight-to-mobile with QR codes • Can be handed out as digital samples at book launches, author readings, include them in publicity packs, etc. (and trackable!) Widgets-on-a-card Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 82
  83. 83. Service Providers Other Solution providers: • Book2Look http://www.book2look.com • Bookbuzzr http://www.bookbuzzr.com • Bowkr http://www.myidentifiers.com Cost: • Jellybooks is free (with VIP invite – just ask!) • Others from $50-120 per title Solution 3: Widgets Part V – Distributed Discovery#dbw15 83
  84. 84. End of Part V for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
  85. 85. #dbw15 85 Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 6 Visual Discovery
  86. 86. Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 86 Don’t Judge a Book by it’s Cover
  87. 87. Covers help us discover! Window display of Daunt’s book shop on Marylebone High Street in London Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 87
  88. 88. Browsing book covers is a joy! travel section of Daunt’s book shop on Marylbone High Street in London Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 88
  89. 89. Browsing covers online is a joy, too! Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 89
  90. 90. Pinterest does it, too http://www.pinterest.com/louisesblooms/books-i-want-to-read Covers allow for easy browsing Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 90
  91. 91. Great Cover Design Some simple ONLINE rules • Less text (title & author already displayed as caption) • Have strong focal colour • Try to the “tell a story with the cover” • Avoid overly stereotypical images • High resolution!!! (the age of tiny thumbnails is over) • Online and physical covers do not need to be the same, but should be recognizably similar Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 91
  92. 92. Great Cover Design Pull You In ‘101 Whiskies to Try before you Die’ by Ian Buxton ‘The Love Affairs of Nathaniel P.’ by Adelle Waldman ‘The Lavender Keeper’ by Fiona McIntosh Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 92
  93. 93. Great Cover Design Strong Focus Colour ‘The Witch’s Daughter’ by Paul Brackston ‘The Art of Immersion’ by Frank Rose ‘A House Without Mirrors’ by Marten Sanden Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 93
  94. 94. Great Cover Design Tells a Story ‘Moonwalking With Einstein’ by Joshua Foer ‘Department of Speculation’ by Jenny Offill ‘Letters from Everest’ by Marten Sanden Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 94
  95. 95. Cover Design Pitfalls Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 95 Hardcover Trade paperback Left cover works very well online and on social media Right cover is not even recognizably the same and almost only text #fail
  96. 96. Not So Great Cover Design Great in print, but not online ‘The Bug’ by Ellen Ullman ‘The social citizen’ by Betsy Sinclair ‘Smarter Than You Think’ by Clive Thompson Part VI – Visual Discovery#dbw15 96
  97. 97. End of Part VI for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
  98. 98. #dbw15 98 Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 7 Incentivised Discovery Using Price & Promotions
  99. 99. Lets bust a few myths: 1. Amazon is the problem It’s more a matter of careful channel and price management. 2. Piracy is the problem No evidence for that. Competitive price promotions are depressing prices. 3. Everybody pays the same price Value is relative. It is what somebody is willing to pay. 4. Creators deserve to be paid One finds readers and wins them over. One does not ‘deserve’ them. Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 99
  100. 100. Background Reading ‘Pricing on Purpose’ by Ronal J. Baker jbks.co/1bSssGD ‘Free’ by Chris Anderson jbks.co/1gUGoVU ‘The Curve’ by Nicholas Lovell jbks.co/1dXKUCv ‘Predictably Irrational’ by Dan Ariely jbks.co/1lYkL7p Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 100
  101. 101. Future of Book Pricing 1. Games have set an example • Free is how you build an audience. Loyalty comes first, monetization after. 2. Bertrand Competition • Price converges to nil when marginal production and distribution cost are zero. 3. Superfans • In the future creators will earn 80% of their revenues form 20% of their readers. 4. Importance of Emotions • Emotional appeal matters most • Importance of worlds and characters ‘The Curve’ by Nicholas Lovell jbks.co/1dXKUCv Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 101
  102. 102. Pricing • Benchmark against title in your genre/category, pricing is becoming highly category dependent • Who are your readers? What is their price sensitivity? Benchmark Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 102 <$1 impulse buy $1- $3 “cheap” buy $3 - $5 “Value” buy $5 - $10 “I need to think about this” buy >$10 “I need this for work” buy
  103. 103. Price Promotions • Best-seller list is one of the top ways of being discovered • How to break in: • Heavy PR or hyper-viral social success • Price promotions • STEPPS – Readers love to share deals • Avoid too many/frequent deals or readers go “meh” • Vicious effect of Bertrand competition 103
  104. 104. Price Promotions Cracking Amazon ‘Lets get Visible’ by David Gaughran jbks.co/Kay8ow Introduction to: • Amazon’ sales ranking algorithm • Amazon’s popularity ranking algorithm • Not every sale is weighted equally • How to “play the game” Warning: Beware that algorithm change. Todays “recipe” or “hack” may not work tomorrow Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 104
  105. 105. Price Promotions • Keep deal durations short (max 72 hours), deals expiring soon more likely to be shared (sense of urgency) • Use discount codes: • make recipients feel special (exclusivity) • trackable codes (reveal how readers found the deal) • Use for price discrimination • Can be linked to getting email address in return Tip: Some promotions best executed direct-to-consumer When and how Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 105
  106. 106. Price Promotions • “flock to unlock” = discount code only sent out when a minimum number of followers retweet the deal (a form of social group buying) • “enter email to get discount” – allows you send new releases and other news to recipient (beware the use of “throw-away” emails) • “buy one, gift one” Tip: Analyse the success of each campaign. Some things work, some don’t. Success can be very variable. Social Deals Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 106
  107. 107. Price Promotions • Typically 50% or more, else readers don’t care and as result don’t share • Never advertise absolute savings: for products costing less than $100, percentage savings are psychologically more powerful • Bundles of multiple books at magical price points: $5, $10 etc.; use one or two “safe” titles as the bundle draw How much? Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 107
  108. 108. Beware the Book Hoarders • When books drop below a certain price point, readers start hoarding • Unread books: • are not reviewed • are not recommended • Are less likely to be shared • Don’t build loyalty Danger: We loose many of the discoverability benefits ! Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 108
  109. 109. Book Fetish The printed book will never die, but its role may well morph to a product for true fans. It’s not about “content” but the emotional and intangible appeal of the product. Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 109
  110. 110. Go Premium 1. Limited edition super-premium hardbacks • Target the super fans (5-20% of readership = Pareto rule) • Key is no cost of materials, but emotional appeal • For shelf in living room or as (status) present to friends • Create multiple price-tiers 2. Reduce risk by using crowd-funding • Kickstarter • Indiegogo • Unbound 3. You need a loyal readership/following! • A crowd-funding campaign requires existing audience Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 110
  111. 111. Exclusivity Incentive • Remembers STEPPS? (E = Emotion) • Strong Tribal appeal = belonging to the “in-crowd” • Increasing prices might improve discoverability: • stands out = something to talk about • appeal to your fan’s emotions (incl. “snob appeal”) • Your most loyal fans are also your biggest promoters • There is some ephemeral beyond “just the content” Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 111
  112. 112. Crowd-funding • Crowd funding does not substitute for an advance unless you are writing the desperately awaited conclusion to an established series • Think of crowd-funding as a low-risk way to upsell to your most loyal readers • You have to be prepared to sell direct: don’t make the specials available through Amazon – exclusivity, uniqueness & emotional appeal are critical Part VII – Incentivised Discovery#dbw15 112
  113. 113. End of Part VII for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
  114. 114. #dbw15 114 Discovery & Discoverability Finding & Building an Audience Part 8 Lifecycle Marketing
  115. 115. Part VIII – Social Discovery#dbw15 115 Background Reading ‘Tribes’ by Seth Godin jbks.co/1cFS7FY ‘Lean Analytics’ by A. Croll & B. Yoskovitz jbks.co/13hkqnz ‘Influence’ by Robert B Cialdini jbks.co/1lZ40c8
  116. 116. Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 116 Lets Bust a Few Myths: It ends with the Book Launch maybe for the publicist, but not for the author or marketing dept. Analytics is for Geeks every author/publisher should master at least basic analytics Old books are forgotten dedicated readers will always keep recommending your books
  117. 117. Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 117 Lifecycle Marketing The conversation never stops Continue engaging with readers and they will continue to share and recommend your book leading to sales and new readers Understand your readers Spend time understanding who your readers are. At this stage analytics becomes paramount. Audience means there is data.
  118. 118. Write more… The best lifecycle discoverability tool is to write more books: • It is easier to sell a new book to your existing 10,000 readers than find another 10,000 readers for your existing book. • The more (good) books you have written, the more strategic options you have. Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 118
  119. 119. Grow The Mailing Lost • CTA (Call-To-Action) buttons at the end of every book to joining the mailing list • Start segmenting the mailing list: – High frequency: “street gang” and super-fans – Low Frequency: loyal, low-engagement readers – VIP List: Influencers, high impact bloggers/reviewers Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 119
  120. 120. Perma-free The Power of Free • Perma-free = permanently free • Consider making the first book in a series free. • A free book is 10x - 100x more likely to be downloaded than one costing $0.10. • If you only have one book, then consider spinning out a free short story or novella as an “introduction” for new readers. Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 120
  121. 121. Bundles Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 121 Tip: Bundles will have to be single file (SKU) for most retailers • Series Bundle • Book Bundles with other authors allows for cross-promotion to related audiences
  122. 122. Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 122 Analytics Google Analytics Positive: • It’s free • It’s powerful • Where is traffic coming from ? • Geographic distribution of your readers? • Helps you understand engagement levels across social networks Negative: • Challenging user interface
  123. 123. Analytics Amazon Data Positive: • Use Vendor Central/KDP dashboard • Correlate sales with marketing activities • Use Amazon affiliate tracking codes Negative: • Separate for each country • Limited data export options buy Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 123
  124. 124. Analytics Kindle Public Pages Positive: • Understand how people read your books • What sections they highlight • Do they finish the book? Negative: • Difficult to export read Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 124
  125. 125. Data, Analytics & Algorithms Our afternoon workshop with presentations by: Perseus Book Group: social media monitoring Netgalley: influencer marketing Vook: sales analytics Idea Logical: SEO Jellybooks: ebook & reader analytics Part VIII – Lifecycle Marketing#dbw15 125
  126. 126. End of Part VIII for slides email vip@jellybooks.com
  127. 127. The End for slides email vip@jellybooks.com

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