Customer and mobile first — 5 insights from working at findmypast

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Five design insights from working for 7 months at findmypast: bringing user-centred design to the company, and moving to a mobile-first world. Note: Not sure how much of it makes sense without my commentary, but knock yourself out.

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Customer and mobile first — 5 insights from working at findmypast

  1. 1. Customer and mobile first
  2. 2. ajfox@findmypast.com @andrewfox Who am I?
  3. 3. What got me excited about findmypast?
  4. 4. 4
  5. 5. We affect people 5
  6. 6. Family history can go mainstream 6
  7. 7. “Making design happen” 7
  8. 8. 1 Being user-focussed 8
  9. 9. 2 Mobile 9
  10. 10. We are getting there 10
  11. 11. Breaking news! Mobile is important
  12. 12. 402% increase in UK traffic
 from mobile devices since 2012 12
  13. 13. Mobile monthly active users: 
 945 million 
 39% year-over-year increase 13 Source: Facebook investor notes 29th January 2014
  14. 14. “48% of people who use Facebook in any given day are only accessing it from mobile” Mark Zuckerberg, 29th January 2014 14 Source: Geekwire
  15. 15. Source: Mobile is Eating the World by Benedict Evans
  16. 16. Interested in the move to new devices? • Ben Evans at ben-evans.com • Good overview from November 2013: Mobile is Eating the World • Subscribe to his newsletter • App Annie at appannie.com • Horace Dediu at asymco.com 16
  17. 17. What we are talking about when we talk about mobile
  18. 18. Mobile is… Apps 18 Web Email Platforms
  19. 19. The ‘mobile web’ doesn’t exist… 19
  20. 20. The ‘mobile web’ doesn’t exist… 20
  21. 21. …and don’t underestimate the web Facebook monthly active users: September 2012 iPhone 11% Android 14% Not mobile 39% RIM 5% Feature phone 6% Mobile web 23% Source: "Facebook's 470m mobile app users" by Ben Evans 21 Other smart 2%
  22. 22. Mobile is not ‘on the go’ 22
  23. 23. Source: Google US, The New Multi-screening World, August 2012
  24. 24. 5 insights
  25. 25. You don’t understand your users
  26. 26. “We don’t do focus groups — that is the job of the designer. It’s unfair to ask people who don’t have a sense of the opportunities of tomorrow from the context of today to design.” Sir Jonny Ive, 2012 26
  27. 27. Wrong* *mostly
  28. 28. “To see what is in front of one’s nose needs a constant struggle.” George Orwell 28
  29. 29. your users u are not Yo
  30. 30. ⚠ Designers Developers Head of Design Managers The C.E.O. A customer
  31. 31. Tool: User research
  32. 32. Start your user research • Chat to them online, or invite them to a café • User testing: ask them to accomplish some tasks • Online user testing • Face-to-face user testing • Shadowing: observe users actions using a service 32
  33. 33. User research tips • 5 people is enough • Don’t ask them leading questions • Observe what they do, more than what they say • Look for themes • Don’t listen to your ego • Share with people in your organisation 33
  34. 34. Build a repeatable process, if you can The bigger the organisation, the more important it is (But, it is more important to do user research, and do it often, than to have a regular process) 34
  35. 35. If you do one thing: Talk to your users 35
  36. 36. Not products, services
  37. 37. Credit: Campaign
  38. 38. People swap devices 21 times an hour "We were quite surprised, and I think the respondents were surprised as well. Not only were they multitasking, but we were surprised at the sheer number of times that they were flip-flopping from one device to another. "Most people would have the TV on for the whole one-hour period, but they would then use their phone, then go to the laptop, then back to the phone, and so on." Research by OMD, article published 3 January 2014 http://www.campaignlive.co.uk/news/1225960/ 38
  39. 39. Source: Google US, The New Multi-screening World, August 2012
  40. 40. People swap devices 21 times an hour • Advertising • Create a service • Cross-channel • Consistent • Smooth • Suitable 40
  41. 41. Example: family history users from offline to online 41
  42. 42. We (nearly always) create services, 
 not standalone products 42
  43. 43. Credit: Livework Tool: Map your service journey
  44. 44. Tool: Service blueprint: Touchpoints • People recommendations • Real-world events (like this!) • Advertising (TV, web, print, billboards, etc.) • Magazine reviews • Social media • Website • Apps • Customer services 44
  45. 45. Credit: Livework Tool: Service blueprint 45
  46. 46. Credit: Livework
  47. 47. 47 Credit: Livework
  48. 48. Credit: Livework Service blueprint: Analyse pain points 48
  49. 49. Tool: Service journey: Go in depth 49
  50. 50. UI is your brand
  51. 51. Your website or app is often the core experience for your customers 51
  52. 52. If user experience is poor (buggy, hard-to-use), then it will reflect badly on your brand 52
  53. 53. If consistency is poor across your UI (and the rest of your brand) then it will reflect badly on your brand 53
  54. 54. Brand identity should not be a set of rules 54
  55. 55. Utility beats aesthetics 55
  56. 56. Tool: Tone of voice guidelines
  57. 57. Twitter Linkedin Facebook Blogs Staff Brand Website Emails Help Users Legal Advertising
  58. 58. Example 2. Inviting people to join Do say Begin, join “Explore your family history” User “Ok, I’ll try it out. How do I start? Hope it’s not too much hassle. What do I need to tell them?” Tips: ✓Keep the offer warm – remember, it’s about stories and people. ✓Inject the user with excitement about what they will do. 58 Don’t say Register, sign up “Get access to X records” “Create an account” User’s feelings: Optimistic, hopeful, impatient findmypast “Join findmypast and begin your journey of discovery. It’s time to start exploring your family history.” 16
  59. 59. Mailchimp Voice & Tone Example: Mailchimp 59
  60. 60. Family history as a game
  61. 61. I hate the word gamification, but… 61
  62. 62. Family history process has similarities to a game Start Task Effort Accomplishment Repeat 62 Level-up
  63. 63. World of Warcraft vs. Family History 63
  64. 64. Start 64
  65. 65. Task 67
  66. 66. Effort 70
  67. 67. Accomplishment 74
  68. 68. Level-up 77
  69. 69. Game design balances friction Web design (UX) typically attempts to remove friction 80
  70. 70. Difficulty Boring G am e M ec h an ic Difficulty Ze n Frustrating 81 Source: Mashable Time spent playing
  71. 71. Currently our search forms look like this 82
  72. 72. Is this the future users want? 83
  73. 73. Would become too easy Boring G am e M ec h an ic Difficulty Ze n Frustrating 84 Time spent playing
  74. 74. Understands what is the game and what isn't Not the game… Is the game… • The register form • Finding records • Navigation
 • Building a family tree 85
  75. 75. Other parallels… From Josh Taylor’s ‘Gaming and Virtual Realties’ • MMORPG (Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Game) • Activity happens at a similar time • Hidden features • Communal • Passion • Geeks (in a good way) • Fun • Addictive 86
  76. 76. Don’t worry We’re not going to try and turn family history into a game 87
  77. 77. Focus
  78. 78. Understand the core interactions 89
  79. 79. Small interactions are perfect for a small screen (and addictive) 90
  80. 80. What does the user really want to do? 91
  81. 81. Example: Polar 92
  82. 82. Family history: search or hints? Finding. • On a mobile or touch device long search forms are frustrating and boring • Hints, such as Ancestry’s, are short circuit search • On the app there is no way to search, just hints 93
  83. 83. Those 5 insights… • Talk to your users • We create services, not standalone products • Your UI is your brand • Family history is closer to a game than traditional web services • For mobile in particular, understand those core interactions 94 ajfox@findmypast.com @andrewfox
  84. 84. ajfox@findmypast.com @andrewfox

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