Math Resource Portfolio

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Math Resource Portfolio

  1. 1. André Monnéy EDU 4336: Teaching Mathematics Math Resource Portfolio October 6th, 2011Overall Goal Of My GamesThe overall goal of my games is to provide the students an opportunity to practice their math skills in agroup environment with their peers and an environment that is less threatening (due to the studentsfeeling like the class is “less academic”). Since my students are a little older (middle school or highschool), the games I’ve played do not require a lot of set up so it can be played in a 50 minute or 35minute period. The other beauty of most of these games is that the content standards can be modifiedto whatever topics or materials you are covering in class at the time. As a whole, I generally run mygames in a few different formats: 1. Individually - The students play individual games when they are playing games on websites. This allows them to track their own work on our Netbook worksheet. 2. Small Groups – When I run my games in small groups, I usually split students up into group of 3- 5 depending on the class size. Most of the time, my seating chart is strategically placed so that higher achieving students sit near by lower achieving students so when it comes time to playing this game. We don’t have to do too many “trades.” In this setting, the students are competing against the other times. Occasionally—depending on the class dynamics—I will have the students try to achieve a class goal so that they are helping each other as opposed to competing against each other. I use the white boards in this set up to see what teams score points and what teams miss points. 3. Two Large Groups – The two large groups generally apply to the game “Secret Path;” however, I have used two large groups in game like “Who Wants To Be Mathematician” as well. I find that
  2. 2. the two large groups are good because it singles one person out to solve the problems, but also gives them a large set of partners to check their work with. On the flipside, this also does create some laziness for the unmotivated students as well. White boards are again used to check the students work. 4. One Large Group – The large group set up was semi-discussed in the “Small Groups” category, but I felt it deserved its own bullet point. When we play games as one large group, the class is generally split up into small groups or kept in rows; however, they compete in the game as one whole team. In this set up, the white boards are very important if the class is split up into groups because the groups have to decide collectively on what answer will go on the board when they hold it up for me to check.Now that the styles of grouping are better discussed, on to the games!Resources Game #1 – Are You Smarter Than A Math TeacherDescription: Although, I’ve only been teaching for a few years, I always have students say “well, you arethe teacher so of course you are going to be really smart in math.” The game “Are You Smarter Than AMath Teacher” is meant to give my students a little ego boost before a test. It also allows me to seecommon mistakes when the students show me their answers and/or display the work.The Goal: The goal in “Are You Smarter Than A Math Teacher” is to earn up to 1,000,000 points for aclass reward (extra credit points). Along the way to a million points, students are able to get otherprizes, such as candy, extra tips on student question, redo on problems missed, or detailed hints on test
  3. 3. questions (I usually give these to them anyways, but explicitly asking makes them feel like they’ve beenrewarded). Most of these rewards can be given at any point level depending on how much time youhave in the period.Rules: In “Are You Smarter Than A Math Teacher” the rules run the same as they do in “Are You SmarterThan A 5th Grader.” I usually draw sticks at random to see who is going to actually explain how theyachieved the answer, this allows me to hold all students responsible for the problems presented in thegame. The students have a few options if they do not understand the problem:  Copy – The student can ask another student for their work if their explanation is incorrect. If the student chooses this option, then they have to explain their error.  Peek – If the student is unsure of their work, they can check their work with a classmates before explaining the question. They are only allowed one look at the work. If they look for a second time, they lose the opportunity to earn points.  Save – If the student gives the wrong answer, they can use one of their classmates work and have that classmate explain the problem. A ‘Save’ can only happen if the student gave the wrong answer. The student is then also responsible for explaining what their error was in their work.Grade Level: “Are You Smarter Than A Math Teacher” can really be used with any grade level (although Iprimarily use it with middle and high school students).Intent: I usually use this game as a review for tests or a way to change up the dynamics or material thatis simple, but needs to be covered to help prep students for another yet.Materials: This game can be played with paper and a document camera, PowerPoint or even a SmartBoard. As long as the game is set up with a number of questions to last the entire period you could evendo the game on a white board with a marker.
  4. 4. Modifications: The modifications I have used for this game are allowing notes for certain students. I alsoplace students strategically throughout the room if they have some sort of visual, hearing, etc. issues. Ifthe students require calculators to do math work (in a IEP or 504 plan) those are also obviously allowed.Resource Game #2 – JeopardyDescription: Jeopardy is just another game to break the monotonous routine of class for the kids.Jeopardy is a familiar game for the students (or most students that is).The Goal: The goal for Jeopardy is to earn the most points you can earn for your team. Most of the time,this game is played in small groups so the students are competing against each other. The team thatearns the most points gets a reward, such as extra credit points, candy, an opportunity to use notes on atest.Rules: The only rules I really stick to with this game is that the student/group must show their workwhen they give their answer. This allows me to verify they know how to do the work and could replicateit on an assessment.Grade Level: “Jeopardy” can really be used with any grade level (although I primarily use it with middleand high school students).Intent: I usually use this game as a review for tests or a way to change up the dynamics or material thatis simple, but needs to be covered to help prep students for another yet.
  5. 5. Materials: This game can be played with paper and a document camera, PowerPoint or even a SmartBoard. As long as the game is set up with a number of questions to last the entire period you could evendo the game on a white board with a marker.Modifications: The modifications I have used for this game are allowing notes for certain students. I alsoplace students strategically throughout the room if they have some sort of visual, hearing, etc. issues. Ifthe students require calculators to do math work (in a IEP or 504 plan) those are also obviously allowed.Resource Game #3 – Deal or No DealDescription: Deal or No Deal is a game that requires students to work the problems out on the board infront of their peers and myself. This allows me to see their thought process as they work through theproblem. The student working on the problem also has advisors who are allowed to agree or disagree bysaying ‘Deal’ or ‘No Deal’. This allows students who are a little more bashful to work knowing they havesome back up. I also usually cap students to one briefcase so that I can make sure to cover as manystudent groups as possible in the period.The Goal: The goal for Deal or No Deal is to earn the most points you can earn for your class. Most ofthe time, this game is played in small groups; however, the students are earning points for the class sothe competition is usually not there to the same extent as if they were to compete against each other.At the end of the period, students can cash in points for reward, such as extra credit points, candy, anopportunity to use notes on a test.
  6. 6. Rules: Choose a suitcase . You will be given a question. You can consult with your advisors, but they canonly say "Deal," or "No Deal." They CANNOT give you the answer to the question. If they do, you will bedisqualified and asked to return to your seat. If you choose to answer the question, tell your teacher"Deal." Your teacher will ask for your answer and tell you if your answer is correct. If you were correct,you will win the amount of points shown and return to your seat. If you choose not to answer thequestion, you say "No Deal." Your teacher will click the "No Deal" button and reveal the amount ofpoints you passed up. Whatever points you banked up with correct answers are yours to keep.Grade Level: “Deal or No Deal” can really be used with any grade level (although I primarily use it withmiddle and high school students).Intent: I usually use this game as a review for tests or a way to change up the dynamics or material thatis simple, but needs to be covered to help prep students for another yet.Materials: This game can be played with paper and a document camera, PowerPoint or even a SmartBoard. As long as the game is set up with a number of questions to last the entire period you could evendo the game on a white board with a marker. I’ve found that if you have a Smart Board, the interactivefeatures on the board are a little more fun that using PowerPoint.Modifications: The modifications I have used for this game are allowing notes for certain students. I alsoplace students strategically throughout the room if they have some sort of visual, hearing, etc. issues. Ifthe students require calculators to do math work (in a IEP or 504 plan) those are also obviously allowed.
  7. 7. Resource Game #4 – Who Wants To Be A MillionaireDescription: Who wants to be a millionaire is another opportunity for students to earn points to use inclass. In who wants to be a millionaire, one student comes up to the front of the classroom and gets towork a problem out to earn money for the class. This allows me to work with a student one on one. Allthe other students are responsible for copying their work down in case a poll occurs and they need todemonstrate their suggested answer.The Goal: The goal of who wants to be a millionaire is to earn money for the class. The money can thenbe exchanged for rewards such as candy, notes, previews of tests, etc. The students are not competingagainst each other so the class as a whole earns the reward.Rules: If a group or student is stumped on a problem they have three options for help: Poll The Class,50/50, or Ask A Teacher. When students Poll The Class they can ask the students whether they think theanswer is A, B, C or D and then make their decision from there. If the students choose 50/50, theteacher scratches out to incorrect answers. If the students choose Ask A Teacher, they can ask theteacher what they think about the question. The teacher usually does not give the exact answer, butgives really good hints!Grade Level: “Who Wants To Be A Millionaire” can really be used with any grade level (although Iprimarily use it with middle and high school students).
  8. 8. Intent: I usually use this game as a review for tests or a way to change up the dynamics or material thatis simple, but needs to be covered to help prep students for another yet.Materials: This game can be played with paper and a document camera, PowerPoint or even a SmartBoard. As long as the game is set up with a number of questions to last the entire period you could evendo the game on a white board with a marker.Modifications: The modifications I have used for this game are allowing notes for certain students. I alsoplace students strategically throughout the room if they have some sort of visual, hearing, etc. issues. Ifthe students require calculators to do math work (in a IEP or 504 plan) those are also obviously allowed.Resource Game #5 – Secret PathDescription: The Secret Path is the most kinesthetic game I play with my students (aside from Frisbeemath, which is not really a “game”). Students are split up into two large groups. Each team is responsiblefor answering the questions on the board in their notebooks or on a piece of paper. The team then has30 seconds to copy their answer onto a white board to reveal to the teacher. If the students get thequestion right, they get an opportunity to step onto the path (the teams should be noting where thestudent steps so they remember the incorrect steps). If they get the step correct they can take anotherstep. If the step is incorrect, the student sits back down and the next team gets a chance to answer thequestion.The Goal: The goal in the Secret Path is to be the first team to discover the secret path and make itacross the grid. This is achieved by answering your math questions correctly.Rules: The rules for the Secret Path are as follows:  Each team will be presented with one problem at a time. If the team answers correctly, they will have the opportunity to take a step on the secret path.  If the team gets the answer wrong, the other team will have an opportunity to answer the question. Both teams will need to solve the problems posted under the document camera in
  9. 9. case the other team misses (it is also a good way to have extra questions to practice when studying).  Someone new has to answer the question each time (you can ask your team for help, but once you are presenting the problem you will need to know how to do it without their help).  If you get the question right, then you will need to walk us through the problem you solved.Grade Level: “Secret Path” can really be used with any grade level (although I primarily use it withmiddle and high school students). If you are going to use it for younger kids, then I would definitelysuggest using a smaller grid so they aren’t wasting brain power on remembering where they took a step.Intent: I usually use this game as a review for tests or a way to change up the dynamics or material thatis simple, but needs to be covered to help prep students for another yet.Materials: This game can be played with paper and a document camera, PowerPoint or even a SmartBoard. As long as the game is set up with a number of questions to last the entire period you could evendo the game on a white board with a marker. The teacher also needs some sort of grid (I’ve created oneon a tarp and used duct tape to create a 9X9 grid. I’ve found that the path can easily be found in a 50minute period.Modifications: The modifications I have used for this game are allowing notes for certain students. I alsoplace students strategically throughout the room if they have some sort of visual, hearing, etc. issues. Ifthe students require calculators to do math work (in a IEP or 504 plan) those are also obviously allowed.
  10. 10. Resource Game #6 – ClassZone.comDescription: ClassZone.com is actually a website offered by the publisher of our math books, McDougalLittell. The nice thing about ClassZone is that there is a game of some sort offered for just about anybook that your students have. In our class, we’ve been using ClassZone as a skill building time during ourStrategic Algebra Support Class. The game that I will be discussing as our example of ClassZone.com iscalled “Chapter 2: Bike Racer.” The other nice thing about ClassZone.com is that you can add your booksto a short cut so that you’re students don’t need to find the book every time they play.The Goal: The goal of “Chapter 2: Bike Racer” is to make it across the finish line without tripping overthe items on the ground (rocks, sticks, etc.) or getting knocked over by the other bike. Every time thestudent falls off the bike, they are required to do a math problem before they continue on. In our class,the students fill out a NetBook worksheet where they record the problem and solve it.Rules: The rules for “Chapter 2: Bike Racer” are as follows:  Make it across the finish line without falling off the bike.  If you fall of the bike, you will be required to record the problem in your NetBook worksheet and solve it. You are required to show your work. If you get the problem wrong, raise your silent hand so that I can help you with the question.
  11. 11.  You are required to finish X number of problems. Teacher Note: The number of problems is generally determined by the time we have with the NetBooks. I’ve found most students can finish at least 7 problems in 30 minutes including set up and clean up time. Every extra problem you finish will give you an extra point on today’s classwork.Grade Level: Since ClassZone.com allows you to select your book, as long as your book is available onthe site, you can pretty much use ClassZone.com for any grade level. “Chapter 2: Bike Racer” is used formiddle school or high school Algebra students.Intent: I usually use the games on ClassZone.com as skill building time for my students. The materialcovered varies depending on what chapter you are looking at which is really nice because the studentscan continue playing the games regardless of where they are on the book. “Chapter 2: Bike Racer” dealswith adding, subtracting, dividing and multiplying integers, matrices, and expressions.Materials: The only materials needed to use the games on ClassZone.com is some sort of computer, apiece of paper to record your problems and work (I have a NetBook handout that the students workwith), and a pencil.Modifications: The modifications I have used for this game are allowing notes for certain students. If thestudents require calculators to do math work (in a IEP or 504 plan) those are also obviously allowed.
  12. 12. Teacher: André Monnéy Subject: General AlgebraCentral Focus: Section 6.1 – 6.4 Review Grade Level: 6th-8th Grade Date: 2/28/2011Rationale:- Today’s lesson will help the students prepare for their quiz on systems of equations. Since the students seem to be familiar with the three procedures (graphing, substitution, and elimination), the majority of our review will review the 5 steps in our procedure and will involve team work to solve the problems given. I will review the problem to verify everyone gets the correct answer.State Adopted Academic Content Standards:- 9.0 Students solve a system of two linear equations in two variables algebraically and are able to interpret them graphically.State Specific Goals and Objectives for the Lesson:- After the review, students will identify slope-intercept form as y=mx+b with 100% accuracy.- After the review, students will be able to figure out whether a point is a solution to a system of equations or not with 100% accuracy.- After the review, students will identify the 5 steps to solve a system of equations using the substitution and elimination method with 100% accuracy.- After the review, students will identify systems of equations with no solution and with infinite solutions and classify them properly with 100% accuracy.- After the review, students will learn how to solve word problems involving systems of equations with 95% accuracy.Pre-Assessments Connecting To Prior Knowledge/Prior Learning:- Review homework with students. Review at least one example of substitution and elimination.Identified Academic Language to be addressed:- Slope Intercept Form – y=mx+b- Standard Form – Ax+By=C- Ordered Pair – (x, y)- System of equations – y1=m1x1+b1, y2=m2x2+b2Learner Characteristics: a. Special Needs – There are no special need students in my class. b. English Language Learner – There are no ELL students in my class; however, there are some in the 7 th period class. To ease their stress, I would highlight key words on the word problems so they could follow along a little bit easier. I would also provide them with a paper with common words they will need to know to solve the problems (elimination, substitution, etc.) as an aid. c. Other – Not applicable.Lesson Delivery:  Introduction-connection of content to previous learning  Review homework with the students: Pg. 353 #8-11, 20-22 (all), 23-31 (odd), 33-34, 37-44  Answer any last minute questions on the homework.  Instruction  I will allow the students to have a review period through the game secret path.  The class will split up down the center into two teams, one sits on each side of the tarp (secret path).  On the tarp there lies a secret path that only I know. The students are required to figure out the path. The first team to figure out the path will get a prize (candy).  Each team will be presented with one problem at a time. If the team answers correctly, they will have the opportunity to take a step on the secret path (see the drawing on the second page after the “Closure” section).
  13. 13.  If the team gets the answer wrong, the other team will have an opportunity to answer the question. Both teams will need to solve the problems posted under the document camera in case the other team misses (it is also a good way to have extra questions to practice when studying).  Someone new has to answer the question each time (you can ask your team for help, but once you are presenting the problem you will need to know how to do it without their help).  If you get the question right, then you will need to walk us through the problems by first identifying the method you used and then explaining step-by-step using the 5 steps we have learned to solve systems of equations.  There will also be key term questions so be familiar with your key words we went over in class.  Assign Homework: Pg. 363 #1-17 Assessments (e.g. diagnostic/formative/summative, formal/informal)  Formative/Diagnostic Assessment: o I will grade the student’s homework with them. (Informal) o I will check in with the students to gauge their comfort level with systems of equations using the thumbs up (I feel good with the work), thumbs sideways (I am still a little confused) and a thumbs down (I am lost). o Once the game starts, I will check the student’s work and correct any answers that might be incorrect. I will also pick key students to explain the procedures they used. (Informal) o If there is a question answered wrong and the class seems “stuck,” I will solve it with the class to guide them through the problem. (Informal)  Summative Assessment: o Homework: Pg. 363 #1-17 (Formal) Closure  Do not forget about your homework: Pg. 363 #1-17  Tomorrow’s quiz is on Solving Systems of Equations:  What are the three methods? Graphing, substitution, and elimination.  Explain the procedures used to complete the 3 methods.  What are the two types of special systems we see? No solutions and infinite solutions.  How would you classify them? Using the table we created in class.  What are the classifications? Consistent, Dependent and Independent; and Inconsistent.

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