Day 2 :
ELA Training
7:45-8:00
Social Time
Today’s Agenda
Teacher Talk: What’s trending in YA literature? What titles are you
noticing the kiddos reading?
Sharing: E...
Small Successes
Table Activity: Jigsaw
•
• Table One: Disengaged Reader/Fake Reader & Engaged Reader :Does
Nonfiction Count?
• Table Two: ...
Rethinking the whole class novel
“…students are not reading more or better as a result
of the whole-class novel. Instead, students are
reading less and are...
Whole Class Novel Concerns
No single text can meet the reading levels of interests of the wide range of
readers in a class...
“Somites are blocks of dorsal mesodermal cells
adjacent to the notochord during vertebrate
organogenesis.”
“Improved vascu...
Close Reading
1. Read closely to determine what the text
says explicitly and to make logical inferences from
it; cite specific textual e...
(c) Frey & Fisher, 2008
TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Focused Instruction
Guided
Instruction
“I do it”
“We...
Creating a Close Reading
Creating a Close Reading
Creating a Close Reading
Use a short
passage
Creating a Close Reading
Use a short
passage
Re-reading
Creating a Close Reading
Use a short
passage
Re-reading
“Read with a pencil”
Creating a Close Reading
Use a short
passage
Re-reading
“Read with a pencil”
Text-dependent questions
Creating a Close Reading
Use a short
passage
Re-reading
“Read with a pencil”
Text-dependent questions
Give students the ch...
Annotation is a note of
any form made while
reading text.
“Reading with a pencil.”
People have been annotating texts
since there have been texts to
annotate.
Annotation is not highlighting.
Annotations
• Underline the major points.
• Circle keywords or phrases that are confusing or unknown to
you.
• Use a quest...
Annotation slows
down the
reader in order to
deepen
understanding.
Annotation occurs with
digital and print texts.
While
reading…
Modeled
annotation
in Seventh
Grade
Student
annotation
in 6th grade
Student sample from Leigh
McEwen, AEA 9, Iowa
Modeling
in 9th
Grade
English
Student
annotation
in 11th
grade
English
A Close Reading of
“Salvador, Late or
Early”
(Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories, 1991)
Text-dependent Questions
• Answered through close
reading
• Evidence comes from text,
not information from outside
sources...
Types of
Text-dependent Questions
Opinions, Arguments,
Intertextual Connections
Inferences
Author’s Purpose
Vocab & Text S...
General Understandings
• Overall view
• Sequence of
information
• Story arc
• Main claim and
evidence
• Gist of passage
General Understandings in Kindergarten
Retell the story in order using the words beginning, middle, and end.
Key Details
• Search for nuances in meaning
• Determine importance of ideas
• Find supporting details that
support main id...
Key Details in Kindergarten
• How long did it take to go from a hatched egg to a butterfly?
• What is one food that gave h...
It took more than 3 weeks.
He ate for one week, and
then “he stayed inside [his
cocoon] for more than two
weeks.”
• Chocolate cake
• Ice cream
• Pickle
• Swiss cheese
• Salami
• Lollipop
• Cherry pie
• Sausage
• Cupcake
• watermelon
Foo...
Vocabulary and Text Structure
• Bridges literal and inferential
meanings
• Denotation
• Connotation
• Shades of meaning
• ...
Vocabulary in Kindergarten
How does the author help us to understand what cocoon means?
There is an illustration of the cocoon,
and a sentence that reads, “He built a
small house, called a cocoon, around
himsel...
• Genre: Entertain? Explain? Inform?
Persuade?
• Point of view: First-person, third-person
limited, omniscient, unreliable...
Author’s Purpose in Kindergarten
Who tells the story—the narrator or the caterpillar?
A narrator tells the story, because
he uses the words he and his. If it
was the caterpillar, he would say I
and my.
Inferences
Probe each argumentin persuasive
text, each ideain informational text,
each key detail in literary text, and
ob...
Inferences in Kindergarten
The title of the book is The Very Hungry Caterpillar.
How do we know he is hungry?
The caterpillar ate food every day “but he
was still hungry.” On Saturday he ate so
much food he got a stomachache! Then
h...
Opinions, Arguments, and Intertextual
Connections
• Author’s opinion and reasoning (K-5)
• Claims
• Evidence
• Counterclai...
Opinions and Intertextual Connections in
Kindergarten
Narrative
Is this a happy story or a sad one?
How do you know?
Infor...
Eisenhower’s Message to the Troops
June 6, 1944
Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force!
You are ab...
Creating Text-Dependent Questions
Level of
Text Specificity
CCS Anchor Standard
Close Reading Skill
Text Dependent
Questio...
Creating Text-Dependent Questions
Level of
Text Specificity
CCS Anchor Standard
Close Reading Skill
Text Dependent
Questio...
Creating Text Dependent Questions
Level of
Text Specificity
CCS Anchor Standard Close
Reading Skill
Text Dependent Questio...
"Our landings in the Cherbourg-
Havre area have failed to gain a
satisfactory foothold and I have
withdrawn the troops. My...
Remember: Text Dependent Questions...
•Can only be answered with evidence from the text.
•Can be literal (checking for und...
Writing Workshop
Phrase cloud
Sarah Kay: If I Should Have a Daughter
Writingfix using Model Texts
“Most Embarrassing Moment”
Model Text: The Watsons Go To
Birmingham- 1963
Learning Purpose: C...
• Constructed Written Response
*Six-Steps of Constructed Written
Response
(Middle School Example and Rubric)
(High School ...
Error Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3 Hour 4
Lack of
capitalization of
proper nouns/
adjectives
BK LM, TJ, JA,
Linking
independent
cl...
“Teaching grammar skills through
explicit instruction in the form of
guidelines, mini-lessons, and mentor
texts provides s...
For your own lesson planning...
“Teachers must teach grammar, not merely mention or
correct errors. The mini-lesson during...
From the blog Notable Sentences
Learning Purpose: To identify how a writer
uses an apostrophe as a literary device (not
pu...
Hodgepodge Assortment of Writer’s Workshop Goodies:
● Student self-editing conventions sheet
● W.O.P. (Writing off of the ...
1. Working together by grade level, choose from 3-4
mentor texts and describe how you would you use it in
your classroom.
...
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
6-12 Day 2 ELA Training
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6-12 Day 2 ELA Training

  1. 1. Day 2 : ELA Training 7:45-8:00 Social Time
  2. 2. Today’s Agenda Teacher Talk: What’s trending in YA literature? What titles are you noticing the kiddos reading? Sharing: Environmental Changes in the classrooms Celebrate: Small Successes Portrait of a Reader Close Reading (Followed by grade level work time) Writing Workshop (Followed by grade level work time)
  3. 3. Small Successes
  4. 4. Table Activity: Jigsaw • • Table One: Disengaged Reader/Fake Reader & Engaged Reader :Does Nonfiction Count? • Table Two: Disengaged Reader/Challenged Readers & Engaged Reader: I Can But I Don’t Want To • Table Three: Disengaged Reader/Unrealistic or Wannabe Reader & Engaged Reader: Stuck in a Genre or Series Reader • Table Four: Disengaged Reader/ Compliant & Engaged Reader: Bookworms • Table Five: Tips for Successful Independent Reading & Remember Engagement is the Goal Each table creates a reader profile for an engaged and disengaged reader. Describe them and their needs. ** Entire article creates a classroom portrait.
  5. 5. Rethinking the whole class novel
  6. 6. “…students are not reading more or better as a result of the whole-class novel. Instead, students are reading less and are less motivated, less engaged, and less likely to read in the future.” --Douglas Fisher and Gay Ivey, “Farewell to Farewell to Arms: De-Emphasizing the Whole Class Novel”
  7. 7. Whole Class Novel Concerns No single text can meet the reading levels of interests of the wide range of readers in a classroom. Novel units take too long Students cannot read enough to develop strong literacy skills. Kids learn how to fake read. Extensions, fun activities, and having the entire book read aloud reduces authentic reading, writing, and thinking. A book isn’t rigorous if students aren’t reading it. - Penny Kittle, Book Love
  8. 8. “Somites are blocks of dorsal mesodermal cells adjacent to the notochord during vertebrate organogenesis.” “Improved vascular definition in radiographs of the arterial phase or of the venous phase can be procured by a process of subtractions whereby positive and negative images of the overlaying skull are superimposed on one another.”
  9. 9. Close Reading
  10. 10. 1. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
  11. 11. (c) Frey & Fisher, 2008 TEACHER RESPONSIBILITY STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY Focused Instruction Guided Instruction “I do it” “We do it” “You do it together” Collaborative Independent “You do it alone” A Structure for Instruction that Works
  12. 12. Creating a Close Reading Creating a Close Reading
  13. 13. Creating a Close Reading Use a short passage
  14. 14. Creating a Close Reading Use a short passage Re-reading
  15. 15. Creating a Close Reading Use a short passage Re-reading “Read with a pencil”
  16. 16. Creating a Close Reading Use a short passage Re-reading “Read with a pencil” Text-dependent questions
  17. 17. Creating a Close Reading Use a short passage Re-reading “Read with a pencil” Text-dependent questions Give students the chance to struggle a bit
  18. 18. Annotation is a note of any form made while reading text. “Reading with a pencil.”
  19. 19. People have been annotating texts since there have been texts to annotate.
  20. 20. Annotation is not highlighting.
  21. 21. Annotations • Underline the major points. • Circle keywords or phrases that are confusing or unknown to you. • Use a question mark (?) for questions that you have during the reading. Be sure to write your question. • Use an exclamation mark (!) for things that surprise you, and briefly note what it was that caught your attention. • Draw an arrow (↵) when you make a connection to something inside the text, or to an idea or experience outside the text. Briefly note your connections. • Mark EX when the author provides an example. • Numerate arguments, important ideas, or key details and write words or phrases that restate them.
  22. 22. Annotation slows down the reader in order to deepen understanding.
  23. 23. Annotation occurs with digital and print texts.
  24. 24. While reading…
  25. 25. Modeled annotation in Seventh Grade
  26. 26. Student annotation in 6th grade Student sample from Leigh McEwen, AEA 9, Iowa
  27. 27. Modeling in 9th Grade English
  28. 28. Student annotation in 11th grade English
  29. 29. A Close Reading of “Salvador, Late or Early” (Cisneros, Woman Hollering Creek and Other Stories, 1991)
  30. 30. Text-dependent Questions • Answered through close reading • Evidence comes from text, not information from outside sources • Understanding beyond basic facts • Not recall!
  31. 31. Types of Text-dependent Questions Opinions, Arguments, Intertextual Connections Inferences Author’s Purpose Vocab & Text Structure Key Details General Understandings Part Sentence Paragraph Entire text Across texts Wor d Whole Segments
  32. 32. General Understandings • Overall view • Sequence of information • Story arc • Main claim and evidence • Gist of passage
  33. 33. General Understandings in Kindergarten Retell the story in order using the words beginning, middle, and end.
  34. 34. Key Details • Search for nuances in meaning • Determine importance of ideas • Find supporting details that support main ideas • Answers who, what, when, where, why, how much, or how many.
  35. 35. Key Details in Kindergarten • How long did it take to go from a hatched egg to a butterfly? • What is one food that gave him a stomachache? What is one food that did not him a stomachache?
  36. 36. It took more than 3 weeks. He ate for one week, and then “he stayed inside [his cocoon] for more than two weeks.”
  37. 37. • Chocolate cake • Ice cream • Pickle • Swiss cheese • Salami • Lollipop • Cherry pie • Sausage • Cupcake • watermelon Foods that did not give him a stomachache • Apples • Pears • Plums • Strawberries • Oranges • Green leaf Foods that gave him a stomachache
  38. 38. Vocabulary and Text Structure • Bridges literal and inferential meanings • Denotation • Connotation • Shades of meaning • Figurative language • How organization contributes to meaning
  39. 39. Vocabulary in Kindergarten How does the author help us to understand what cocoon means?
  40. 40. There is an illustration of the cocoon, and a sentence that reads, “He built a small house, called a cocoon, around himself.”
  41. 41. • Genre: Entertain? Explain? Inform? Persuade? • Point of view: First-person, third-person limited, omniscient, unreliable narrator • Critical Literacy: Whose story is not represented? Author’s Purpose
  42. 42. Author’s Purpose in Kindergarten Who tells the story—the narrator or the caterpillar?
  43. 43. A narrator tells the story, because he uses the words he and his. If it was the caterpillar, he would say I and my.
  44. 44. Inferences Probe each argumentin persuasive text, each ideain informational text, each key detail in literary text, and observe how these build to a whole.
  45. 45. Inferences in Kindergarten The title of the book is The Very Hungry Caterpillar. How do we know he is hungry?
  46. 46. The caterpillar ate food every day “but he was still hungry.” On Saturday he ate so much food he got a stomachache! Then he was “a big, fat caterpillar” so he could build a cocoon and turn into a butterfly.
  47. 47. Opinions, Arguments, and Intertextual Connections • Author’s opinion and reasoning (K-5) • Claims • Evidence • Counterclaims • Ethos, Pathos, Logos • Rhetoric Links to other texts throughout the grades
  48. 48. Opinions and Intertextual Connections in Kindergarten Narrative Is this a happy story or a sad one? How do you know? Informational How are these two books similar? How are they different?
  49. 49. Eisenhower’s Message to the Troops June 6, 1944 Soldiers, Sailors and Airmen of the Allied Expeditionary Force! You are about to embark upon the Great Crusade, toward which we have striven these many months. The eyes of the world are upon you. The hopes and prayers of liberty-loving people everywhere march with you. In company with our brave Allies and brothers-in-arms on other Fronts, you will bring about the destruction of the German war machine, the elimination of Nazi tyranny over the oppressed peoples of Europe, and security for ourselves in a free world. Your task will not be an easy one. Your enemy is well trained, well equipped and battle hardened. He will fight savagely. But this is the year 1944! Much has happened since the Nazi triumphs of 1940-41. The United Nations have inflicted upon the Germans great defeats, in open battle, man-to-man. Our air offensive has seriously reduced their strength in the air and their capacity to wage war on the ground. Our Home Fronts have given us an overwhelming superiority in weapons and munitions of war, and placed at our disposal great reserves of trained fighting men. The tide has turned! The free men of the world are marching together to Victory! I have full confidence in your courage and devotion to duty and skill in battle. We will accept nothing less than full Victory! Good luck! And let us beseech the blessing of Almighty God upon this great and noble undertaking. SIGNED: Dwight D. Eisenhower
  50. 50. Creating Text-Dependent Questions Level of Text Specificity CCS Anchor Standard Close Reading Skill Text Dependent Question Words/Phrases Analyze how specific word choices shape tone (Standard 4) What words and phrases does General Eisenhower use to inspire the troops on D-Day?
  51. 51. Creating Text-Dependent Questions Level of Text Specificity CCS Anchor Standard Close Reading Skill Text Dependent Question Sentences Assess how point of view shapes content (Standard 6) Eisenhower states that this invasion will “bring about the destruction of the German war machine… eliminate tyranny… and create security throughout the world.” What does that sentence reveal about him?
  52. 52. Creating Text Dependent Questions Level of Text Specificity CCS Anchor Standard Close Reading Skill Text Dependent Question Paragraphs Summarize key supporting details (Standard 2) Ike’s message to the troops acknowledges the difficulty of the mission, but assures them that they will be triumphant. In what ways does he accomplish this? Investigate the structure of specific sentences, paragraphs, and sections of text (Standard 5) How does the use of religious imagery contrast in the opening and closing?
  53. 53. "Our landings in the Cherbourg- Havre area have failed to gain a satisfactory foothold and I have withdrawn the troops. My decision to attack at this time and place was based upon the best information available. The troops, the air and the Navy did all that Bravery and devotion to duty could do. If any blame or fault attaches to the attempt it is mine alone.” Eisenhower’s “In Case of Failure” Letter "Our landings in the Cherbourg-Havre area have failed to gain a satisfactory foothold and I have withdrawn the troops. My decision to attack at this time and place was based upon the best information available. The troops, the air and the Navy did all that Bravery and devotion to duty could do. If any blame or fault attaches to the attempt it is mine alone." July 5
  54. 54. Remember: Text Dependent Questions... •Can only be answered with evidence from the text. •Can be literal (checking for understanding) but must also involve analysis, synthesis, evaluation. •Focus on word, sentence, and paragraph, as well as larger ideas, themes, or events. •Focus on difficult portions of text in order to enhance reading proficiency. •Can also include prompts for writing and discussion questions. •Should be created collaboratively with one or more teachers
  55. 55. Writing Workshop
  56. 56. Phrase cloud
  57. 57. Sarah Kay: If I Should Have a Daughter
  58. 58. Writingfix using Model Texts “Most Embarrassing Moment” Model Text: The Watsons Go To Birmingham- 1963 Learning Purpose: Create a strong lead for a developed narrative. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.W.8.3 Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.
  59. 59. • Constructed Written Response *Six-Steps of Constructed Written Response (Middle School Example and Rubric) (High School Example) ● WKCE, ACT, SAT, In-Class Writing Assessments (Activity)
  60. 60. Error Hour 1 Hour 2 Hour 3 Hour 4 Lack of capitalization of proper nouns/ adjectives BK LM, TJ, JA, Linking independent clauses without a comma and conjunction or semicolon GF, HT, YM, TS, SB
  61. 61. “Teaching grammar skills through explicit instruction in the form of guidelines, mini-lessons, and mentor texts provides students with a strong foundation.” CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.8.2 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.9- 10.1 Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.
  62. 62. For your own lesson planning... “Teachers must teach grammar, not merely mention or correct errors. The mini-lesson during writing workshop provides a prime instructional opportunity within an established writing time, thus encouraging students to put newly acquired grammar knowledge into practice.” Teaching the Language Arts (2013)
  63. 63. From the blog Notable Sentences Learning Purpose: To identify how a writer uses an apostrophe as a literary device (not punctuation) Model Text: Jane Eyre "You did right to hold fast to each other," I said: as if the monster-splinters were living things, and could hear me. (Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre, page 281)
  64. 64. Hodgepodge Assortment of Writer’s Workshop Goodies: ● Student self-editing conventions sheet ● W.O.P. (Writing off of the Page) Atwell ● TeenInk for Publication ● Student charted growth based on the CCSS ● Analyzing speeches as formal arguments Any other ideas?
  65. 65. 1. Working together by grade level, choose from 3-4 mentor texts and describe how you would you use it in your classroom. 2. Each team is responsible for filling out an Exit Ticket based on your design and mentor-text selection. Apply ideas from today to your own curriculum.

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