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Media Literacy

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Presentation from ICE on Media Literacy for teachers and students

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Media Literacy

  1. 1. Media Literacy Teaching kids to intelligently navigate the information highway.
  2. 2. Media Literacy - Overview of presentation » Definition » Importance » Teaching points » Resources » Question and answer
  3. 3. Definition 1 » ・ The ability to read, analyze, evaluate and produce communication in a variety of media forms (television, print, radio, computers, etc.).www.pbs. org/weta/myjourneyhome/teachers/glossary .html
  4. 4. Definition 2 » ・ Media literacy is the skill of understanding the nature of communications, particularly in regard to telecommunications and mass media. The skill entails knowledge of the structural features of the media, and how these might tend to influence the content of the media. en.wikipedia .org/wiki/Media_literacy
  5. 5. Importance » How do our students learn to make sense of their worlds when so much of their information arrives distorted through the "looking glass" of mass media? » Journalistic ethics are often "put out to pasture" and left to rust in the chase after ratings and profits. (http://www.fno.org/jun99/media.html)
  6. 6. Importance » The Internet Explosion » There are at least 600 billion web sites (“billions and billions”) » Search engines or directories typically access “only” 6 billion » Typical students usually look at the first few entries
  7. 7. One example A true story - source » Educational Renaissance Planners - founded by Alan November to promote the effective use of information and communication technologies that support and enhance learning for children and communities. (http://www.anovember.com)
  8. 8. “How the Holocaust didn’t happen” » http://pubweb.acns.nwu.edu/~abutz/index » Arthur Butz, author, Professor at Northwestern University
  9. 9. Addressing Media Literacy » Author credibility » Format and presentation » Scope » Cost and accessibility » Final considerations
  10. 10. Author credibility » Backwards navigate http://pubweb.acns.nwu.edu/~abutz/index.html » Author search: Ask Jeeves Google Profusion
  11. 11. Author credibility » Grammatical or spelling errors? » Sources of information available? » Bias and stereotype?
  12. 12. Format and Presentation » Graphics and content » Navigational ease » Who is the audience? » Readability » “Clutteriness”
  13. 13. Scope » Usefulness and uniqueness » Purpose » Factually based » Originality » Currency » Frequency of updates
  14. 14. Cost and accessibility » Consistently available » Text based alternative » Dead links » Fee based
  15. 15. Final considerations » Use of tildes ~ » Comparing information » Who sponsors or authors the site? » Research from MS and HS in CO: 500 sites selected randomly (of 130,000) 27% considered reliable
  16. 16. Resources » Kathy Schrock’s Guide for Educators http://school.discovery.com/schrockguide/eval.ht ml » Teaching Media Literacy in an Age of Edutainment http://www.fno.org/jun99/media.html » November Learning http://www.anovember.com/Default.aspx? tabid=160 » An Introduction to Media Literacy http://www.ci.appstate.edu/programs/edmedia/ medialit/article.html#What%20is%20Media %20Literacy
  17. 17. Questions and Answers
  18. 18. Presented by… Janet Buckenmeyer & Staci Trekles Milligan Purdue University Calumet Hammond, IN http://education.calumet.purdue.edu /Tutorials/ICE

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