Learning at the Speed ofLight: Deep Learning andAccelerated Online ProgramsAnastasia M. TreklesPh.D. CandidateInstructiona...
Introduction• Accelerated online degree programs are becoming moreand more popular (Penprase 2012; Tatum, 2010)• At the gr...
Problem Statement• Graduate-level online accelerated programs areincreasing rapidly to help adult learners achievenecessar...
Key Informing Research• Bernard et al. (2004), Bekele andMenchaca (2008), and Shachar &Neumann (2010) noted that manyvaria...
Theoretical Framework• Graduate-level coursework isintended to bring studentstoward expert-levelunderstanding – i.e., deep...
Methodology• Population: All students ingraduate-level courseworkconsidered accelerated(time-compressed) anddelivered asyn...
Data Collection• Research Question 1:• Revised 2-Factor StudyProcess Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) (Biggs, Kember,& Leung, 2001...
Data Analysis• Interpretive embeddedsingle-case study• NVivo software used toorganize, find themes, andanalyze data• Patte...
Limitations• Case study limited to oneprogram and a smallsample despite the fact thatparticipants came from awide geograph...
Results: RQ1• RQ1: How do learners approach their learning inaccelerated, asynchronous online graduatecourses?• Results fr...
R-SPQ-2F Results
Results: RQ2• RQ2: Which instructional design characteristics andstrategies used in accelerated asynchronous onlinecourses...
First Principles by Course
Conclusions
Recommendations• Online, accelerated graduate course and program designshould:• Use consistency in structure and schedulin...
Questions?
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Learning at the Speed of Light: Deep Learning and Accelerated Online Programs

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Presentation summarizing the results of my dissertation research, which was a case study regarding accelerated online graduate programs and the approaches that students take to learning.

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Learning at the Speed of Light: Deep Learning and Accelerated Online Programs

  1. 1. Learning at the Speed ofLight: Deep Learning andAccelerated Online ProgramsAnastasia M. TreklesPh.D. CandidateInstructional Design for OnlineLearningSchool of EducationCapella Universityatrekles@capellauniversity.eduValparaiso, IN219-545-3442
  2. 2. Introduction• Accelerated online degree programs are becoming moreand more popular (Penprase 2012; Tatum, 2010)• At the graduate level, these programs present aquestion: can students learn deeply enough to becomeexperts in their field within a compressed amount oftime?• I investigated a masters-level accelerated program (15months to completion, 10 5-week courses) in EducationalAdministration• Instructional design of all courses except internship (9 out of10 courses)• Student approaches to learning and experiences incoursework
  3. 3. Problem Statement• Graduate-level online accelerated programs areincreasing rapidly to help adult learners achievenecessary skills and credentials more quickly(Wlodkowski & Ginsberg, 2010)• Research in effectively meeting deep learning outcomesin online learning is mixed, as controlling for method ofcourse delivery is difficult (Shachar & Neumann, 2010)• Understanding student approaches to learning and howthey may be affected by the instructional designcharacteristics of courses would assist universities indeveloping higher-quality programs
  4. 4. Key Informing Research• Bernard et al. (2004), Bekele andMenchaca (2008), and Shachar &Neumann (2010) noted that manyvariables can impact online learningacquisition, so studying deeplearning presents a challenge• Course design, student motivation,and learner development all canimpact learning performance andapproach (Biggs & Collis, 1982;Bransford et al., 2000; Merrill, 2012)• Penprase (2012), Johnson (2009),and Driessnack et al. (2011)discussed accelerated learners’perceptions and characteristics
  5. 5. Theoretical Framework• Graduate-level coursework isintended to bring studentstoward expert-levelunderstanding – i.e., deeplearning (Biggs & Collis, 1982;Bransford et al., 2000)• Instructional design models,such as Merrill (2012), providefor the systematic increase ofstudent learning depth• But, there are still significantgaps in understanding deeplearning approaches inaccelerated online coursework
  6. 6. Methodology• Population: All students ingraduate-level courseworkconsidered accelerated(time-compressed) anddelivered asynchronouslyonline• Sampling method: Fromavailable programs, oneprogram at a Midwesternpublic university wasselected• 136 total students in Masterof Science in EducationalAdministration program• Sample:• 9 courses (out of 10,excluding internship)• 17 survey respondents• 5 interview participants• Participants recruited viaemail, courseannouncements fromadvisor• Volunteered to participate
  7. 7. Data Collection• Research Question 1:• Revised 2-Factor StudyProcess Questionnaire (R-SPQ-2F) (Biggs, Kember,& Leung, 2001)• Interviews via Skype• Research Question 2:Course analysis usingMerrill’s e3 rubric (2009;2012) and SOLOTaxonomy (Biggs & Tang,2007)
  8. 8. Data Analysis• Interpretive embeddedsingle-case study• NVivo software used toorganize, find themes, andanalyze data• Pattern-matching andconstant comparativeanalysis used to findthemes and comparewithin and across each setof data and embeddedcases
  9. 9. Limitations• Case study limited to oneprogram and a smallsample despite the fact thatparticipants came from awide geographic area• University program wasmaster’s-level in education– other disciplines may bedifferent• University was public andlocated in the Midwest –other regions and typesmay be different
  10. 10. Results: RQ1• RQ1: How do learners approach their learning inaccelerated, asynchronous online graduatecourses?• Results from R-SPQ-2F and interviews showed certainthings to influence students’ learning approaches:• Time• Personal motivation and direction• Course structure and content• Assignment scheduling• Use of projects vs. quizzes• Real-world concepts and assignments• Peer interaction• Technology expectations
  11. 11. R-SPQ-2F Results
  12. 12. Results: RQ2• RQ2: Which instructional design characteristics andstrategies used in accelerated asynchronous onlinecourses play a role in helping learners reach deeperlevels of learning?• Course analysis through Merrill’s (2012) rubric and SOLOTaxonomy supported RQ1 finding that learning approachcan be promoted through course design• Course objectives covered all levels of SOLO Taxonomy• Activities provide real-world practice, peer collaboration, fieldexperience, and reflection• Courses built logically from one activity to the next toincrease depth of understanding and performance level• 5 weekly modules, consistent look and feel throughoutcourses
  13. 13. First Principles by Course
  14. 14. Conclusions
  15. 15. Recommendations• Online, accelerated graduate course and program designshould:• Use consistency in structure and scheduling• Use real-world projects over exams and other less authenticassessment measures• Focus on key objectives and avoid including extra work orinformation that is just “nice to know”• Further research may:• Include greater numbers of programs and participants• Investigate other disciplines, other types of programs• Investigate learning approach in comparison to learningacquisition
  16. 16. Questions?

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