Greening Maintenance Facilities<br />A LEEDing Edge for your Agency<br />Anastasia Harrison, AIA LEED-AP<br />Gannett Flem...
Sustainability for Today’s Facilities<br />Understanding sustainability for today<br />Initiating sustainability in our tr...
Greening your Facility<br />
Reduce  Recycle  Reuse<br />
Horizontal Considerations<br />Storm Water Management<br />Heat Island Effect<br />Pavement area in US cities 30-40%*<br /...
Pavement area in US cities 30-40%*<br />STORM WATER<br />* Heat island group<br />
Stormwater management<br />
HEAT ISLAND EFFECT<br />
Fresh Asphalt<br />Reflectivity 5%<br />Temperature: 123 F<br />Aged Asphalt<br />Reflectivity 10%<br />Temperature 115 F<...
GOOGLE Campus, Kirkland WA<br />
Vertical Considerations<br />Reducing Electricity and Energy<br />Resource Management<br />Healthier Indoor Environments<b...
What is the New Normal?<br />ROI<br />LCCA<br />INTEGRATED DESIGN<br />HIGH PERFORMANCE<br />RENEWABLE<br />MANAGEMENT<br />
REDUCED<br />ENERGY<br />CONSUMPTION<br />Occupants and tenants perceive value of working in a green building to be:<br />...
CASE STUDIES<br />23% less energy<br />80% reclaimed water<br />40% less water<br />32% less energy<br />80% water recycle...
NJ TURNPIKE INTERCHANGE 8 TOLL PLAZA<br />Location: East Windsor Township, NJ<br />Owner: NJ Turnpike Authority<br />21% 	...
NJ TURNPIKE INTERCHANGE 8 TOLL PLAZA<br />Location: East Windsor Township, NJ<br />Owner: NJ Turnpike Authority<br />19% 	...
BUS OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE FACILITY<br />Location: Richmond, VA<br />Owner: Greater Richmond Transit Company<br />21% 	E...
CAMPUS SQUARE OFFICE FACILITY IN HARRISBURG’S MIDTOWN HISTORIC DISTRICT<br />Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, <br />Owner: GreenW...
Phoenix Sky Train <br />Phoenix, Arizona<br />Owner: City of Phoenix<br />32% EnergyOptimization<br />40% lesswater <br />...
Image by: diDomenico + Partners, LLP<br />
GRAND AVENUE BUS DEPOT & CENTRAL MAINTENANCE FACILITY<br />Location: NYC, New York<br />Owner: Greater Richmond Transit Co...
CAMPUS SQUARE OFFICE FACILITY IN HARRISBURG’S MIDTOWN HISTORIC DISTRICT<br />Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, <br />Owner: GreenW...
KEY ELEMENTS<br />N<br />UNDERGROUND STORMWATER MANGEMENT SYSTEM<br />EQUIPMENT AND CONTROL BLDG.<br />SPILL CONTAINMENT P...
WHAT WILL THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?<br />“To save the world, we must first reinvent it”. <br />Brooklyn-based <br />architect ...
Anastasia Harrison, AIA LEED-AP<br />Gannett Fleming<br />Director of Sustainability<br />USGBC NJ<br />Board of Directors...
Ibtta raleigh presentation greening facilities 2010 a
Ibtta raleigh presentation greening facilities 2010 a
Ibtta raleigh presentation greening facilities 2010 a
Ibtta raleigh presentation greening facilities 2010 a
Ibtta raleigh presentation greening facilities 2010 a
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Ibtta raleigh presentation greening facilities 2010 a

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Greening Maintenance Facilities, real life lessons and looking at LEED for measurable metrics.

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  • Fleet RetrofitsAlternative FuelsBiowswales: Bioswale is different by design and function - Transport water at reduced velocity – Designed to reduce pollutants Infiltration Biological conversion Vegetative uptakeEnvironmental Stewardship – becoming aware of our surroundings and leaving a smaller impactBioFuels – looking at local industry that can produce local home grown biofuels to manage fleets, operations or offer ‘for sale’ for customers. Energy Efficiency is changing every day, only 4 years ago, a car that operated at 20 mpg was considered fuel efficient, but now we are looking at possibly the first successful all electric vehicle to hit the market next month. But which is it the tail pipe or the smoke stack. When diriving an electric vehicle we must always be aware of what fuel source is filling up your car. Is it coal? Natural gas? Oil? Nuclear? Renewable Energy can renewable power be fuel for you car? How many solar panels over your roof would you need to generate enough power for 300 miles?Finally we look toward our buildings all agencies have facilities, from toll plaza’s to maintenance facilities, administration offices and even police stations, bunk room and areas for the general public (rest stops) so how can we look at all of the elements we described and green our facilities?LEED for Facilities
  • The first step is to look at the three R’s – Reduce Recycle and Reuse. In our industry we see a lot of waste being generated. Are we really taking the opportunity to reuse it or recycle any construction materials? Or how about include some of these materials into our roadways, we have here a picture of old rubber tires. Tires can be shredded and placed into the roadway mix to add longevity to the mix and resiliency. Concrete can be crushed and used as sub base/gravel for roads, buildings or infill. Asphalt can be recycled on site for lower material costs, reduced transportation costs of new materials on site, and also lower your transfer costs for dumping. The program has proven very successful in ____ states. Net we can move to facility operations, general day to day. Is there a recycling policy? Can you capture cardboard, glass bottles, cans, plastics and recycle the maximum amount your facility can? Currently hauling trash fees and recycling are about even, but the time will come shortly when none of these items are allowed into the trash? How will the facility manage recyclables going forward? Thnk about them now. Bio management of blackwater and greywater in some areas of our country is not so foreign. Collecting sludge and then using the first filtered collection for biofuel is proving successful in areas like///// Then the water is continued to be treated and reused by the facility. We will discuss more practical applications later during the case studies.
  • Looking at how to manage facilities we must break it down into two categories. Horizontal VsVerticalAll horizontal surfaces have elements that can be altered that are more environmentally sensiteve and energy efficient than others. The first is storm water management. We deal with stormwater quantity and quality issues from increasing pavement surfaces. The more pavement we increase the more storm water that needs to be managed. Currently these items are expensive to consider, but may infact become cheaper than paying the ‘rain tax’
  • http://www.usatoday.com/printedition/news/20100329/1astormwater29_st.art.htm Cities Slap Fees on Storm Runoff September 2010 (USA TODAY) The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has started issuing a series of limits on storm-water pollution that will require local governments to spend large amounts of money on water quality and soon start slowly reshaping America&apos;s roads, housing developments and even the traditional lawn. The average home is looking to pay anywhere from $4-8 per month. The amount depends on how much space is consumed by roofs, driveways and other surfaces. Large retail stores, schools and airports can pay thousands of dollars a month: Looking forward how are we going to deal with stormwater? Bioswales, permeable pavement; on site water treatement, green roofs.
  • Highways represent a substantial portion of total impervious areas that generate runoff water. Because of congestion area, deicing materials, oils from vehicles, this storm water has the potential for compromising the integrity of water downstream, and thus is required to be detained in large areas of land. Rain gardens, small shallow normally dry basin to caputre runoff and treat exposed water with plans for infiltration. A bioretention consists of shallow normally dry basin designed to capture first flush – artificial soil profile 2-5 feet deep Dryponds – large area to drain over time, Wetponds – large area normally with water, designed to slowly release water over specified period You want the lowest impact for the development.
  • Pavements absorb more heat than they emit during the dayAt night they continue to emit the heat absorbed during the dayIf an interior is kept at 75F and the external temperature is reduced from 105F to 95F by heat island mitigation, the air conditioning bill can be reduced by 33%”Source “its not cool to be in huston” by Ronald Sass Dept of Ecology and Evolution Biology Rice University Houston TXLIGHTING &amp; ENERGY Its all about doing this for less, a lighter not necessarily concrete pavement, yields a lower energy cost annually by approximately 11-20%
  • Yes it costs more to add a coating to the pavement, but it is wise to do this in areas that make the most sense. Here you see it on the travel areas, not the regular parking areas. Solar reflective coatings on asphalt pavement can achieve SRI 29+ (up to SRI 50)
  • Currently these items are expensive to consider, but may infact become cheaper than paying the ‘rain tax’
  • Now lets look at overall energy consumption. Here we see buildings at No 1, transportation at No 2 and industry at No 3. We have a large footprint on our world.
  • The USGBC Mission: To transform the way buildings and communities are designed, built and operated, enabling an environmentally and socially responsible, healthy and prosperous environment that improves the quality of life.is LEED Leadership in Energy &amp; Environmental Design is The only nationally accepted benchmark for the design, construction and operation of high performance green buildings.
  • A Sustainable design will improve occupant health and well being as well as increase productivity. Only 5 years ago you could not find a non-VOC paint. Today you can easily purchase at any local hardware or big box home improvement stores. As demand increases, the market transforms leading to green building market leaders and eventually green building innovators.
  • Energy reduction of 20% from high efficiency units, building envelope, thermal protection, light roof, heat island effect, thermal glazing for all windows, light colored pavement around facility. CO2 monitors for not regularly occupied spaces. Controlled daylighting sensors tied to electric. Only local landscaping used to surround facility with no water being used for facility. Alternative vehicles are part of the agency’s plan, Erosion &amp; sedimentation control plan that provides on site water quantity and quality compliance for LEED.
  • An initial study looking at all maintenance facilities was commissioned by client to estimate the resources that would be needed to offer this program for LEED. Careful choices were made reviewing all of the facility elements to meet a minimum of LEED silver certification with little to no additional cost over standard well done construction methods. Building envelope precast concrete, reduces wasted materials, higher thermal envelope, high efficienty windows, solar shading on south elevations. Landscape used for east and west sides, area identified for employees to have a vegetable garden
  • Greater Richmond Transit Co is oldest mass transportation system in the US currently celebrating its 150th anniversary. The search for a large enough site to house 560 employees in operations, maintenance and administration, as well as provide enough space for an active fleet of buses and para transit vehicles began. Extensive search for the site: had to be within city limits. 12AC site off belt Boulevard was selected, previous site was 5ACSince the new site was adjacent to a residential community it was critical to have community support. The combination of functionality with all of the aspects of LEED helped to create this more efficient sustainable facility. 8/14 site credits were obtained because of careful site placement, reuse of existing site infrastructure, and asbestos remediation, community connectivity/alt transportation. 3 bus lines. 75% of construction waste was diverted from landfills : recycling steel framing, masonry and concrete. 21% of energy savings resulted from special heating and ventilation equipment that recovers energy be extracting heat from building exhaust stream and pre-heating the incoming fresh air, (heat recovery): thermally efficient building envelope; use of natural daylighting; 30% water reduction, plus an 80% efficient water reclamation system to recycle the wash water used for bus washing. Additionally Community Benefits: urban renewal in an area that was lacking political support, now more than 500 worker daily on this site. Improved operationsMost importantly thisproject was completed on time and under budget! LEED offers a third party review that focus on ensuring metric and elements to this building were done correctly. The project is the first public building in Richmond to achieve the USGBC LEED Silver Certification.
  • GreenWorks Development’s Campus Square Project is part of one of the most comprehensive urban renewal projects ever undertaken in Harrisburg, Pa. One of the greenest buildings in Central Pennsylvania, this 73,000-square-foot building serves as a benchmark for sustainable design and construction. Now nearing the final stages of occupancy, the building houses office space for the Green Center of Central Pennsylvania, a sustainable energy education and training facility, and hosts retail shops and restaurants on the first floor. The total project cost was approximately $14.8 million. Drilled 46 wells throughout a two-month period to accommodate a geothermal system installed below the new buildingInstalled a 42-kilowatt photovoltaic (PV) solar power system on the upper roofUsed energy modeling software to evaluate the building envelope and the mechanical, electrical, and lighting systems to maximize energy efficiencyReduced the potential heat-island effect by incorporating a white roof with PV solar panels and a smaller vegetative roofIncorporated three different types of brick and stone in the building façade in order to comply with historic district design requirements Initiated environmentally friendly building practices during constructionReduced the owner’s operational (energy) costs by half through green initiatives and systemsDesigned a geothermal system under the building in an urban settingIncorporated design features for exemplary water use efficiencyIncorporated procedures for exemplary construction waste recyclingPurchased 75 percent of the building materials from suppliers located within a 500-mile radiusUtilized fly ash from the Harrisburg incinerator in every cubic yard of concrete and the foundation to reduce the amount of pollution and portland cement
  • The Aviation Department is conducting a pilot study of the use of the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) for new construction. LEED points that include reducing urban heat island, water conservation, recycling of construction debris and energy efficiency are mandatory requirements for Aviation’s design and construction firms. Use of LEED Standards for PHX Sky Train connecting the Airport to regional light rail and PHX Sky Train stations will result in the first transportation project to use LEED.Where feasible excavated soils, asphalt and concrete removed during construction projects are stored on-site for reuse as are scrap metals.ENERGY STAR reflective roof products are used to reduce heat transfer and reduce peak cooling demand in terminals.Architect HOKEngineering Dinter Engineering Company is responsible for the electrical, mechanical and plumbing designs for the stations as well as the medium voltage distribution system. Our contributions include energy efficient designs that will result in LEED’ “Green Building” certification for the entire project. Designs are being produced utilizing state-of-the-art Revit building modeling software, which aides in quality control and will result in fewer construction conflicts.Mechanical and electrical design of facilities for a phased new passenger train system with elevated guideways, and elevated stations. Stage 1 connects the Automated Train from 44th and Washington Streets to the East Economy Lot (EEL) and continues to Terminal 4--approx. 1.9 miles of predominantly aerial dual guideway. Stage 1 includes guideway structures, power substations, equipment rooms, other supporting utility infrastructure and three elevated center-loaded platform stations–1) the 44th Street Station which connects to the local light rail system, future parking and a future ground transportation center; 2) the East Economy Lot (EEL) Station which connects to the Airport’s existing East Economy Parking Lot; and 3) the Terminal 4 (T4) Station located on the south side of the existing terminal, connecting to the terminal’s passenger areas via new walkways. Power substations and equipment room buildings house equipment that supplies all the train’s electrical needs including traction power, onboard auxiliaries, track equipment, and related station equipment. Substations are located and sized to support the Automated Train System program requirements. The future Stage 2 will extend the automated Sky Train past the future West Terminal, and terminates at the Rental Car Center. The 44th Street and T4 Stations will be fully enclosed and air conditioned while the EEL Station will be an open-air station with cooling/heating systems for specific equipment rooms only. Our mechanical work includes design of the HVAC and plumbing systems for the 44th Street Station, independent of the existing T4 HVAC systems, with digital control/monitoring temperature control systems compatible with the existing Airport systems; design of high-efficiency, low-power and water-use-type plumbing systems for janitors’ sinks, floor drains, floor sinks, domestic water, and electricity for domestic water heaters in the stations. The 44th Street Station will be designed with central water-cooled chiller, cooling tower and water-side economizer, which is the same type of system that will be installed at the EEL Station should that Station ever be closed in. The EEL Station is currently being designed with provisions for a future HVAC system. The 44th Street Station will require a 350-ton chilled water plant, and the EEL Station would require a 250-ton chilled water plant. The T-4 Station will utilize approximately 200 tons of chilled water to be furnished from the existing T-4 10,000-ton central cooling plant. Our electrical work includes design of a future new City of Phoenix-owned electrical substation and power, lighting, lightning and surge protection systems as well as 3 miles of 15 kV power distribution in the form of redundant feeders for train propulsion power for station power, design of 15 kV metered service equipment, and coordination with Arizona Power Service (APS). Electrical design also includes roadway and parking lot lighting for areas affected by the construction of the aerial guideways. The total service size will exceed 10 megawatts.
  • LIRR Train Wash Renovate existing 1971-era train wash to meet needs of current train fleetUpgrade to current LIRR operational and environmental standardsMeet MTA’s sustainability missions and mandatesFacilityRemove existing train wash and construct an unmanned, automatically operated, single direction facility capable of washing one 14-car consist every 15 minutesArchitectural &amp; Structural Post-Consumer Recycled SteelRequire local East Coast manufacturers50% post-consumer recycled steelInsulated Perimeter Concrete BlockR-9 Insulation InsertsRoof InsulationR-30 insulated roof structureWhite Roof Cap SheetingSolar Reflectance Index of 78HVAC SystemEnergy Recovery UnitsIn accordance with International Mechanical Code and ASHRAE Standards
  • Photovoltaic&apos;s system installed to provide approximately 4% Generates approximately 4% of annual electric consumption Ancillary power for building lighting and receptaclesWash Water Recycling SystemWastewater Pre-Treatment SystemTrack Drip Pan Collection SystemSpill Collection PadStormwater Pollution PreventionUnderground Stormwater Retention SystemProtection of WetlandsPhotovoltaic SystemGreen Building Design Architectural, Structural, HVAC, PlumbingUnderground Stormwater Management SystemEfficient use of site space to store the NYSDEC required water quality volumeMinimizes the excavation needed for other stormwater management practicesPrevents site erosion and sediment run offProvides for groundwater rechargeKey ComponentsReclamation via trench drainsWash water and pre-rinse settling tanks25 Micron cyclone separatorsWaste water pre-treatmentMinimizes fresh water usage and waste water discharge Approximately 4,600 gallons are required to wash one 14-car consist at 2 mphApproximately 3,300 gallons recycled (71%)
  • Tracking higlights vehicle usage details, idle times and speeding.
  • Daily “Report Card” tracks vehicle usage
  • Note all the orange report arrows. Each one of these is a three minute IDLE event.
  • This is after 5 months. Note all the WHITEreport arrows. Note the ABSENCE of ORANGE arrows. Major reduction in IDLE time once the driver was made aware.
  • GPS device placed on vehicle in April 20009, note the May IDLE times/events. On June 1st the driver was informed that they were being tracked. Note the September numbers. Same mileage but 75% reduction in IDLE events as well as Speeding (speeding reduces engine efficiency thus increasing carbon footprint.
  • Ibtta raleigh presentation greening facilities 2010 a

    1. 1. Greening Maintenance Facilities<br />A LEEDing Edge for your Agency<br />Anastasia Harrison, AIA LEED-AP<br />Gannett Fleming<br />Director of Sustainability<br />USGBC NJ<br />Board of Directors, Executive Board<br />Education Committee<br />908-755-0040 x 3050<br />aharrison@gfnet.com<br />
    2. 2. Sustainability for Today’s Facilities<br />Understanding sustainability for today<br />Initiating sustainability in our transportation facilities<br />Finding resources for measuring levels of green<br />Discovering a NEW NORMAL?<br />Balancing competing demands<br />
    3. 3. Greening your Facility<br />
    4. 4. Reduce Recycle Reuse<br />
    5. 5. Horizontal Considerations<br />Storm Water Management<br />Heat Island Effect<br />Pavement area in US cities 30-40%*<br />Habitat disruption <br />Environmental Stewardship<br />
    6. 6. Pavement area in US cities 30-40%*<br />STORM WATER<br />* Heat island group<br />
    7. 7.
    8. 8. Stormwater management<br />
    9. 9. HEAT ISLAND EFFECT<br />
    10. 10. Fresh Asphalt<br />Reflectivity 5%<br />Temperature: 123 F<br />Aged Asphalt<br />Reflectivity 10%<br />Temperature 115 F<br />Asphalt with Coating<br />Reflectivity 80%<br />Temperature 90 F<br />
    11. 11. GOOGLE Campus, Kirkland WA<br />
    12. 12. Vertical Considerations<br />Reducing Electricity and Energy<br />Resource Management<br />Healthier Indoor Environments<br />Building to Meet Standards<br />
    13. 13.
    14. 14.
    15. 15.
    16. 16.
    17. 17.
    18. 18. What is the New Normal?<br />ROI<br />LCCA<br />INTEGRATED DESIGN<br />HIGH PERFORMANCE<br />RENEWABLE<br />MANAGEMENT<br />
    19. 19.
    20. 20. REDUCED<br />ENERGY<br />CONSUMPTION<br />Occupants and tenants perceive value of working in a green building to be:<br />INCREASED<br />PRODUCTIVITY<br />Test<br />HEALTH<br />BENEFIT<br />LOWER<br />OPERATING<br />COSTS<br />POSITIVE<br />MARKETING<br />AND<br />PROMOTION<br />OVERALL<br />ENVIRONMENTALBENEFIT<br />
    21. 21. CASE STUDIES<br />23% less energy<br />80% reclaimed water<br />40% less water<br />32% less energy<br />80% water recycled <br />21% <br />less energy<br />50% renewable <br />energy<br />
    22. 22. NJ TURNPIKE INTERCHANGE 8 TOLL PLAZA<br />Location: East Windsor Township, NJ<br />Owner: NJ Turnpike Authority<br />21% Energy reduction<br />40% less water use<br />80% construction waste diverted from landfill<br />90% Daylighting and views <br />LEED® FACTS<br />New Jersey Turnpike Interchange 8 Toll PlazaEast Windsor Township, New Jersey<br />LEED for New ConstructionPending Certification (v2.2)<br />SILVER 38*<br />Sustainable Sites……………………….. 8/14<br />Water Efficiency ………………………….. 4/5<br />Energy and Atmosphere ……………… 3/17<br />Materials and Resources ……….…… 8/13<br />Indoor Environmental Quality …… 11/15<br />Innovation and Design …………..……... 4/5<br />*Out of a possible 69 points<br />SILVER REGISTERED<br />
    23. 23. NJ TURNPIKE INTERCHANGE 8 TOLL PLAZA<br />Location: East Windsor Township, NJ<br />Owner: NJ Turnpike Authority<br />19% Energy reduction<br />47% less water use<br />85% construction waste diverted from landfill<br />90% Daylighting and views <br />LEED® FACTS<br />New Jersey Turnpike <br />Sustainable Design StudyVarious Locations, New Jersey<br />LEED for New ConstructionPending Certification (v2.2)<br />SILVER 51*<br />Sustainable Sites……………………….. 11/26<br />Water Efficiency ………………………….. 8/10<br />Energy and Atmosphere ……………… 8/35<br />Materials and Resources ……….…… 8/14<br />Indoor Environmental Quality …… 12/15<br />Innovation and Design …………..……... 5/6<br />Regional Priority Credit……….…… 8/14<br />*Out of a possible 110points<br />SILVER REGISTERED<br />
    24. 24. BUS OPERATIONS & MAINTENANCE FACILITY<br />Location: Richmond, VA<br />Owner: Greater Richmond Transit Company<br />21% Energy reduction<br />30% less water use<br />75% construction waste diverted from landfill<br />LEED® FACTS<br />Bus Operations and Maintenance FacilityRichmond, Virginia<br />LEED for New ConstructionPending Certification (v3.0)<br />SILVER 38*<br />Sustainable Sites……………………….. 8/14<br />Water Efficiency ………………………….. 4/5<br />Energy and Atmosphere ……………… 5/17<br />Materials and Resources ……….…… 8/13<br />Indoor Environmental Quality …… 9/15<br />Innovation and Design …………..……... 4/5<br />*Out of a possible 69 points<br />SILVERCERTIFIED<br />
    25. 25. CAMPUS SQUARE OFFICE FACILITY IN HARRISBURG’S MIDTOWN HISTORIC DISTRICT<br />Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, <br />Owner: GreenWorks Development, LLC<br />Energy Star Compliant- Equipment<br />Less Water Use<br />Demolition/Construction Waste Diverted from Landfill<br />100%<br />28%<br />97%<br />LEED® FACTS<br />GreenWorks Development, LLC’s Campus Square Office FacilityHarrisburg, Pennsylvania<br />LEED for New ConstructionPending Certification (v2.0)<br />SILVER 36*<br />Sustainable Sites……………………….. 6/15<br />Water Efficiency ………………………….. 2/5<br />Energy and Atmosphere ……………… 9/14<br />Materials and Resources ……….…… 5/11<br />Indoor Environmental Quality …… 7/11<br />Innovation and Design …………..……... 5/5<br />*Out of a possible 61 points<br />GOLD CERTIFIED<br />
    26. 26. Phoenix Sky Train <br />Phoenix, Arizona<br />Owner: City of Phoenix<br />32% EnergyOptimization<br />40% lesswater <br />90% daylightviews<br />LEED® FACTS<br />Phoenix Sky Train Phoenix, Arizona<br />LEED for New ConstructionPending Certification (v2.2)<br />SILVER 40*<br />Sustainable Sites……………………….. 6/14<br />Water Efficiency ………………………….. 3/5<br />Energy and Atmosphere ……………… 10/17<br />Materials and Resources ……….…… 4/13<br />Indoor Environmental Quality …… 13/15<br />Innovation and Design …………..……... 4/5<br />*Out of a possible 69points<br />GOLD REGISTERED<br />
    27. 27. Image by: diDomenico + Partners, LLP<br />
    28. 28. GRAND AVENUE BUS DEPOT & CENTRAL MAINTENANCE FACILITY<br />Location: NYC, New York<br />Owner: Greater Richmond Transit Company<br />21% Energy reduction<br />30% less water use<br />75% construction waste diverted from landfill<br />FACTS<br />Bus Operations and Maintenance FacilityRichmond, Virginia<br />LEED for New ConstructionPending Certification (v3.0)<br />SILVER 38*<br />Sustainable Sites……………………….. 8/14<br />Water Efficiency ………………………….. 4/5<br />Energy and Atmosphere ……………… 5/17<br />Materials and Resources ……….…… 8/13<br />Indoor Environmental Quality …… 9/15<br />Innovation and Design …………..……... 4/5<br />*Out of a possible 69 points<br />NYS Executive Order 111<br />
    29. 29. CAMPUS SQUARE OFFICE FACILITY IN HARRISBURG’S MIDTOWN HISTORIC DISTRICT<br />Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, <br />Owner: GreenWorks Development, LLC<br />Energy Star Compliant- Equipment<br />Water Recycled <br />Demolition/Construction Waste Diverted from Landfill<br />100%<br />71%<br />97%<br />NYS Executive Order 111<br />
    30. 30. KEY ELEMENTS<br />N<br />UNDERGROUND STORMWATER MANGEMENT SYSTEM<br />EQUIPMENT AND CONTROL BLDG.<br />SPILL CONTAINMENT PAD<br />TEMPORARY CONSTRUCTION FENCE<br />TRACK PAN<br />TRAIN WASH BAY<br />PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEM<br />
    31. 31. WHAT WILL THE FUTURE LOOK LIKE?<br />“To save the world, we must first reinvent it”. <br />Brooklyn-based <br />architect & visionary, <br />Mitchell Joachim<br />
    32. 32. Anastasia Harrison, AIA LEED-AP<br />Gannett Fleming<br />Director of Sustainability<br />USGBC NJ<br />Board of Directors, Executive Board<br />Education Committee<br />908-755-0040 x 3050<br />aharrison@gfnet.com<br />

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