HRMPS 15 - CHAPTER 1

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HOSPITALITY ORGANIZATIONAL MANAGEMENT

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  • Traditional Viewpoint Labor was regarded as a mere commodity that could be acquired or disposed like any other properties. Workers are employed to operate the machines, and are considered as part of the machine.
  • The  Industrial Revolution  was a period from 1750 to 1850 where changes in agriculture, manufacturing, mining, transportation, and technology had a profound effect on the social, economic and cultural conditions of the times
  • Scientifically select, train, and develop each employee rather than passively leaving them to train themselves
  • Managers must be aware of these 'social needs' and cater for them to ensure that employees collaborate with the official organization rather than work against it. Mayo's simple instructions to industrial interviewers set a template and remain influential to this day i.e. A. The simple rules of interviewing:- 1. Give your full attention to the person interviewed, and make it evident that you are doing so. 2. Listen - don't talk. 3. Never argue; never give advice. 4. Listen to: what he wants to say; what he does not want to say; what he can not say without help. 5. As you listen, plot out tentatively and for subsequent correction the pattern that is being set before you. To test, summarize what has been said and present for comment. Always do this with caution - that is, clarify but don't add or twist
  • Each of us is motivated by needs. Our most basic needs are inborn, having evolved over tens of thousands of years. Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs helps to explain how these needs motivate us all. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs states that we must satisfy each need in turn, starting with the first, which deals with the most obvious needs for survival itself. Only when the lower order needs of physical and emotional well-being are satisfied are we concerned with the higher order needs of influence and personal development. Conversely, if the things that satisfy our lower order needs are swept away, we are no longer concerned about the maintenance of our higher order needs
  • Each of us is motivated by needs. Our most basic needs are inborn, having evolved over tens of thousands of years. Abraham Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs helps to explain how these needs motivate us all. Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs states that we must satisfy each need in turn, starting with the first, which deals with the most obvious needs for survival itself. Only when the lower order needs of physical and emotional well-being are satisfied are we concerned with the higher order needs of influence and personal development. Conversely, if the things that satisfy our lower order needs are swept away, we are no longer concerned about the maintenance of our higher order needs
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  • HRMPS 15 - CHAPTER 1

    1. 1. HRMPS 15ORGANIZATIONALMANAGEMENT
    2. 2. Introduction
    3. 3. The Industrial Revolution
    4. 4. The Industrial Revolution Machines supplanted human labor in factories which led to the organization of the modern factory system. Industrialization led migration Problems rise in psychological and social relationship As industries expanded, workers with varied social, educational, economic and political backgrounds converged. Long hours of work, low wages, poor working conditions Certain abuses perpetrated by factory owners on the workers.
    5. 5. Theories Contributed to Management Thinking
    6. 6. Frederick W. TaylorMaster of Scientific Management
    7. 7.  Replace rule-of-thumb work methods with methods based on a scientific study of the tasks. Scientifically select, train, and develop each employee rather than passively leaving them to train themselves. Provide "Detailed instruction and supervision of each worker in the performance of that workers discrete task" . Divide work nearly equally between managers and workers, so that the managers apply scientific management principles to planning the work and the workers actually perform the tasks
    8. 8. Elton MayoFounder of Human Relations Movement
    9. 9. Elton Mayo Founder of Human Relations Movement Individual workers cannot be treated in isolation, but must be seen as members of a group. Monetary incentives and good working conditions are less important to the individual than the need to belong to a group. Informal or unofficial groups formed at work have a strong influence on the behavior of those workers in a group.
    10. 10. DOUGHLAS MCGREGOR X AND Y THEORY
    11. 11. DOUGHLAS MCGREGOR X AND Y THEORY X THEORY - In this theory, which has been proven counter effective in most modern practice, management assumes employees are inherently lazy and will avoid work if they can and that they inherently dislike work. As a result of this, management believes that workers need to be closely supervised and comprehensive systems of controls developed. Y THEORY -In this theory, management assumes employees may be ambitious and self-motivated and exercise self-control. It is believed that employees enjoy their mental and physical work duties. According to them work is as natural as play
    12. 12. Frederick Herzberg- Motivation-Hygiene Theory,
    13. 13. Frederick Herzberg Two Factor Theory "The Dual Structure Theory" - Motivation-Hygiene Theory, Motivators (e.g. challenging work, recognition, responsibility) that give positive satisfaction, arising from intrinsic conditions of the job itself, such as recognition, achievement, or personal growth,[4] and Hygiene factors (e.g. status, job security, salary,  fringe benefits, work conditions) that do not give positive satisfaction, though dissatisfaction results from their absence. These are extrinsic to the work itself, and include aspects such as company policies, supervisory practices, or wages/salary.[
    14. 14.  Essentially, hygiene factors are needed to ensure an employee is not dissatisfied. Motivation factors are needed to motivate an employee to higher performance. Herzberg also further classified our actions and how and why we do them, for example, if you perform a work related action because you have to then that is classed as movement, but if you perform a work related action because you want to then that is classed as motivation.
    15. 15. Abraham MaslowHierarchy of Needs
    16. 16. Hierarchy of Needs
    17. 17. Growth & Dev. Of HRM in the Philippines

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