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HRMPS 13 (MIDTERM)Chapter 5 Managed services

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HRMPS 13 (MIDTERM)Chapter 5 Managed services

  1. 1. Chapter 9 Managed Services ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  2. 2. After Reading and Studying This Chapter, You Should Be Able to: Outline the different managed service segments Describe the five factors that distinguish managed service operations from commercial ones Explain the need for and trends in elementary and secondary food service Describe the complexities in college and university foodservice Identify characteristics and trends in health care, business and industry, and leisure and recreation foodservices ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  3. 3. What Are Managed Services? Consists of all food service operations in the following segments Service operations including  Leisure and recreation  Conference centers  Airports  Travel plazas  Military  Airlines  Elementary and secondary schools  Colleges and universities  Health care facilities  Business and industry ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  4. 4. Unique Qualities Challenge to please guest and client Guests are captive clientele (they may not have an alternate dining option) Foodservice is not the primary business Produce food in large quantity Volume of business is consistent ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  5. 5. Reasons for Contract Management Financial Quality of program Recruitment of management and staff Expertise in management of service departments Resources available Labor relations Outsourcing of administrative functions ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  6. 6. Airlines  Foodservice at airports is typically contracted  An airline meal or in-flight meal is a meal served to passengers on board a commercial airliner. These meals are prepared by airline catering services.  The first kitchens preparing meals in- flight were established by United Airlines in 1936.  These meals vary widely in quality and quantity across different airline companies and classes of travel. ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  7. 7. ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  8. 8. Military  The military serves food to hundreds of thousands of service members each day. Meals must be carefully planned and prepared to ensure good nutrition and variety. Food service managers direct the facilities that prepare and serve food ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  9. 9. Food ser vice managers in the militar y per form some orall of the following duties: Manage the cooking and serving of food at mess halls Direct the operation of officers’ dining halls Determine staff and equipment needed for dining halls, kitchens, and meat-cutting plants Set standards for food storage and preparation Estimate food budgets Maintain nutritional and sanitary standards at food service facilities ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc. Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice Hall John Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  10. 10. Elementary and Secondary Schools ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  11. 11. National School Lunch Act 1946, students received good meals, the military would have healthier recruits. School managed service focused on good nutrition and food safety provided for school children. ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.11 Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice Hall John Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  12. 12. Colleges and UniversitiesColleges and university food service operations are more complex and diverse. Among the various constituents of food service management are: Residence halls Sports concessions conferences Cafeterias/student unions Faculty clubs Convenience stores Administrative catering Outside catering ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  13. 13. Trends in Campus Dining Branded concepts Privatization Pictured is the logo for a campus dining hall at Hamilton University Campus cards ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  14. 14. Healthcare Facilities Health care food service operations are remarkably complex because of necessity of meeting diverse needs of a delicate clientele. Health care managed services are provided to hospital patients, long term care and assisted living residents, visitors and employees ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  15. 15. Healthcare Foodservice Offered Tray Cafeteria Dining room Coffee shop Catering Vending ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  16. 16. Healthcare Challenge because of special meal requirements Economic pressures of health care Use of sous vide and cook chill methods Increased market share of contractors Use of major quick-service chains ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  17. 17. Business and Industry (B&I) 3 Important terms to understand in B&I food service: 1. Contractors – contractors are other companies that operate foodservice for the client on a contractual basis. 2. Self – Operators – companies that operate their own food service operations. 3. Liaison Personnel – are responsible for translating corporate philosophy to the contractor and for overseeing the contractor to make certain that he or she abides by the terms of the contract. ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  18. 18. Leisure and Recreation Foodservices Characteristics Unique and fun (Stadiums, arenas and state parks), Customers are always in a hurry, food service offer the product in a very short period of time ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  19. 19. Contract Management Client Perspective Disadvantages Some segments perceived as institutionalized Potential for lost contracts ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  20. 20. Trends in Managed Services Increasing challenges Reduction of revenues Increased cost Declining enrollment Declining balance on debit cards Increase in food to go Dueling demands for managers from students and administrators ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458
  21. 21. More Trends 24 hour foodservice Increase in healthcare and nursing homes Proliferation of branded concepts Development of home meal replacement options Increased use of fresh product ©2006 Pearson Education, Inc.Introduction to Hospitality, Fourth Edition Pearson Prentice HallJohn Walker Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458

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