CONDITIONAL SENTENCES NA1
ZERO CONDITIONAL <ul><li>Used for facts that are always true.   </li></ul><ul><li>If + present simple, present simple. </l...
TYPE I:LIKELY OR REAL <ul><li>If + present simple, WILL/ going to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you  come  to the party, you’ l...
Other Patterns <ul><li>Requests: if + future, future  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you ’ll  just wait a minute, I ’ll  call th...
TYPE II: UNLIKELY/IMAGINARY <ul><li>If + simple past/ past continuous, would/could/ might/ should + infinitive </li></ul><...
<ul><li>POLITE REQUESTS: IF + WOULD  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you  would  contact me, I’ll give you all the details about ...
TYPE III: UNREAL/ IMAGINARY IN THE PAST <ul><li>Imaginary situations in the past. </li></ul><ul><li>Used to criticise, to ...
MIXED CONDITIONALS (TYPES 2 AND 3) <ul><li>Mixed conditionals express two main types of situations: </li></ul><ul><li>A pr...
Compare this to the third/unreal conditional, which expresses a past situation that results from a past condition: If I ha...
2. A past situation that is the result of a present or continuing condition    If + simple past, Perfect conditional (woul...
OTHER CONJUNCTIONS <ul><li>Unless= if...not . Often used in warnings. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We’ll be late for our English ...
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Conditional sentences na1

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Conditional sentences na1

  1. 1. CONDITIONAL SENTENCES NA1
  2. 2. ZERO CONDITIONAL <ul><li>Used for facts that are always true. </li></ul><ul><li>If + present simple, present simple. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you study a lot, you always pass your exams. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you press the switch, the computer comes on. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Also If + past simple, past simple. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If it rained, he always stayed indoors. </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. TYPE I:LIKELY OR REAL <ul><li>If + present simple, WILL/ going to </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you come to the party, you’ ll enjoy yourself. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If the concert is on Friday, I’m going to buy the tickets at once. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If + present ( simple, continuous, perfect ), imperative </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you come to the party, bring some wine. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you have finished , come to the party. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you are expecting someone, tell him to join us. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If + present ( simple, continuous, perfect ), modal </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you come to the party, you must bring a bottle of wine. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you have finished , you can come with us </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you are expecting someone, I can leave. </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Other Patterns <ul><li>Requests: if + future, future </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you ’ll just wait a minute, I ’ll call the manager to help you. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If + should/ If + happen to (less likely but possible) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you should see James, tell him to phone me. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If you happen to see James, tell him to phone me. </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. TYPE II: UNLIKELY/IMAGINARY <ul><li>If + simple past/ past continuous, would/could/ might/ should + infinitive </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you were driving from Cartagena to Cuenca, what way would you go? (You are not driving) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If I went to London, I could/ might improve my English (unlikely that you’ll go but possible). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If I were rich, I would travel around the world. </li></ul><ul><li>If she was/were rich, she wouldn’t work. </li></ul><ul><li>Were you really ill , I would call the doctor (formal). </li></ul>
  6. 6. <ul><li>POLITE REQUESTS: IF + WOULD </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If you would contact me, I’ll give you all the details about the project. </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. TYPE III: UNREAL/ IMAGINARY IN THE PAST <ul><li>Imaginary situations in the past. </li></ul><ul><li>Used to criticise, to point out mistakes or to express a regret. </li></ul><ul><li>If+ past perfect, would/ could /might have + past participle </li></ul><ul><ul><li>If I had gone to the party, I would have taken a bottle of wine. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>If I had heard the alarm clock, I could have arrived in time. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Had I known the results, I would have phoned you. (formal) </li></ul>
  8. 8. MIXED CONDITIONALS (TYPES 2 AND 3) <ul><li>Mixed conditionals express two main types of situations: </li></ul><ul><li>A present situation that is the result of a past </li></ul><ul><li>condition   </li></ul><ul><li>If + past perfect, Present conditional (would + verb) </li></ul><ul><li>If I had worked harder at my old job, I would still have the </li></ul><ul><li>job now. </li></ul><ul><li>(I didn’t work hard at my old job. As a result, I don’t have the job now.) </li></ul><ul><li>I would have lots of money now if I had invested it properly. </li></ul><ul><li>( I don’t have money now because I didn’t invest properly in the past.) </li></ul>
  9. 9. Compare this to the third/unreal conditional, which expresses a past situation that results from a past condition: If I had won the lottery, I would have bought my mother a new house. ( I didn’t win the lottery. I didn’t buy a new house for my mother)
  10. 10. 2. A past situation that is the result of a present or continuing condition   If + simple past, Perfect conditional (would have + past participle)   If he wasn’t such a good programmer, we would have fired him months ago. (He is a good programmer, and as a result we didn’t fire him months ago)   More examples: If I wasn’t afraid of flying, I wouldn’t have driven to the meeting. (I am afraid of flying. As a result I drove to the meeting)
  11. 11. OTHER CONJUNCTIONS <ul><li>Unless= if...not . Often used in warnings. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We’ll be late for our English lesson unless we hurry. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>As long as (or so long as )= if, on condition that. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We’ll be on time for our lesson as long as you hurry up. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provided (that)/providing (that)= if, on condition that. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Providing (that) you lay the table, I’ll cook. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>He will pass his exam, provided (that) he studies a lot. </li></ul></ul>

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