Gamified Rotary
Assignment for Gamification Level 2 certification
submitted by
An Coppens (@GamificationNat)
http://www.ga...
Rotary International
Non-profit club network with primary objective
of making a positive lasting change in the
community (...
Gamified Rotary
Why?
As an honorary member of the Rotary Club of Cork, former
district officer, active club member in both...
The challenge
• People in this demographic are busy often with
young families, often focused on making their
career/busine...
The opportunity
• The highly structured system in place lends
itself to gamification
• With the recent development of eclu...
What is Gamification?
Gamification is the process of using game
mechanics and game thinking in non-gaming
contexts to enga...
Potential volunteer members

Socialisers: motivated
by relatedness. They
want to interact with
others and create
social co...
How to appeal to each type?
Philanthropist

Socialiser

Achiever

Meaning/purpose: need to
understand the meaning or
purpo...
The key to making gamification work
online and in a club, district and
worldwide

Measure what matters
most:
Contribution
Contribution
Can be measured in
Time given to project, cause, club, district
Money donated to project, cause or Rotary
F...
Measure openly in leaderboards
Why?
As a young professional I want to spend my effort
where I can see it make a difference...
Effect of transparency
• Clarity of purpose for each member and
potential members
• Increased engagement because nobody wa...
Contribution celebrations
When leaderboards are kept up-to-date weekly
following the meeting pattern of physical clubs,
- ...
Fun rewards for action
End Polio campaign example:
- Share ‘this much’ youtube clip on Twitter and
Facebook
Member earns L...
Original rewards
Some clubs have original campaigns for the End
Polio cause such as:
- Purple pinkie (school visits and ch...
Special achievement circles
• Rotary already has the Paul Harris
award, which can be extended in levels
– One time achieve...
Visitor rewards
• Rotarians are encouraged to visit other clubs
when travelling for business and pleasure
• Allow visitors...
Crowd-resourcing for projects
Projects often need input from members of
various clubs, by creating a resourcing page for a...
Have fun contributing!
This is a course assignment as part of the level 2 Gamification Design Expert from
www.engagementalliance.org.

Prepared b...
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Gamified rotary - course assignment for Gamification Design Expert - level 2

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Course assignment created by An Coppens
for engagement alliance level 2 qualification

The presentation gives ideas on how to gamify the attraction and retention of potential and existing members of Rotary by applying game techniques which can be applied online as well as off-line. They would provide fun rewards and transparency as well as instant feedback and encourage contribution across the network.

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  • Final certification assignment for Gamification Level 2: Expert from the Engagement Alliance http://engagementalliance.org/get-certified/get-certified/Course requirement: submit creative outline of non-profit, explore player types and game mechanics to encourage engagementCourse link: https://www.udemy.com/designing-gamification-level-2-expert-certification(By the way excellent course an dhighly recommended by me An Coppens)
  • https://www.rotary.org/http://www.polioeradication.org
  • These are my personal opinions and perceptions based on feedback I received from my peer group, not based on scientific research.
  • Source: http://engagementalliance.org/what-is-gamification/
  • Gamification user types are based on the user types in the work of AndrzejMarczeski : www.marczewski.me.uk
  • Gamification user types are based on the user types in the work of AndrzejMarczeski : www.marczewski.me.ukSource: Gamification inspiration cards of AndrzejMarczewski
  • For consistency, my suggestion would be to track the same way worldwide, which then makes transparency and collation at each level easier.
  • The key for this dynamic to work is transparency and openness
  • As a new member or even a potential new member it is often unclear how you can contribute to the club, yet you can actually contribute in so many ways through projects.
  • https://vimeo.com/51087896The endpoliocampaigncurrentlycontainsanexcellenttemplate for future campaignsthatcanbeheld online as well as offline.Virtual badgeportfolio’slikecredlywhichalso link to social media are ideal, memberscanevenchoosetosharethemontheirLinkedIn profile
  • Maybe partner with organisation that create badges such as Badgeville, Credly or even Foursquare to create special Rotary badges.
  • Clubs receive this only when they have visitors and for e-clubs these can be meetings with project committees/ club members on Rotary business or even online attendance of meetings
  • Photographs courtesy of www.freedigitalphotos.net
  • Gamified rotary - course assignment for Gamification Design Expert - level 2

    1. 1. Gamified Rotary Assignment for Gamification Level 2 certification submitted by An Coppens (@GamificationNat) http://www.gamificationnation.com
    2. 2. Rotary International Non-profit club network with primary objective of making a positive lasting change in the community (both local and global). • 1.2 million volunteer members worldwide • Projects focus on peace and conflict resolution, disease prevention and treatment, water and sanitation, health, basic education and literacy, economic and community development. • Known for Polio Plus and starting the Global Polio Eradication Iniative
    3. 3. Gamified Rotary Why? As an honorary member of the Rotary Club of Cork, former district officer, active club member in both Cork and Stockholm (SIRC), I enjoyed the projects I worked on, the global impact we could make and made lasting friendships. I always wondered how could we attract more people in my demographic: young professional 30-55, busy, interested in making a positive difference in the community with the commitment to follow through on promises
    4. 4. The challenge • People in this demographic are busy often with young families, often focused on making their career/business work, multiple other interests and organisations they can be part of • As a potential member you don’t always understand how you could contribute and as an existing member you may start to question whether you are making any difference at all • Rotary often seen as being for men and mainly in the late career, retirement bracket with a heavy time commitment. Highly structured and rule driven.
    5. 5. The opportunity • The highly structured system in place lends itself to gamification • With the recent development of eclubs, Rotary has an opportunity to tap in to new volunteer (aka player) groups • Gamification has the added potential of retaining and re-engaging existing members
    6. 6. What is Gamification? Gamification is the process of using game mechanics and game thinking in non-gaming contexts to engage users and to solve problems. Gamification leverages game design, loyalty program design and behavioral economics to create the optimal context for behavior change and successful outcomes.
    7. 7. Potential volunteer members Socialisers: motivated by relatedness. They want to interact with others and create social connectedness. Philanthropists: motivated by purpose & cause. They want to give back and enrich the life of others Achievers: motivated by mastery. They are looking to learn new things and improve themselves. They want challenges to overcome
    8. 8. How to appeal to each type? Philanthropist Socialiser Achiever Meaning/purpose: need to understand the meaning or purpose. Being part of something greater than themselves Social network: allow people to connect and be social Learning: give them tools to learn and master Access: to more abilities in a system can give people more ways to help others and contribute Social pressure: peer support Challenges: test their and pressure to motivate each knowledge and allow them to other forward apply it. Helps keep interest Gifting/sharing: altruistic giving or sharing of items with other people Social discovery: interest matching and status can help to build relationships Quests: give users a fixed goal to achieve often made up of linked challenges Sharing knowledge: help others by sharing their knowledge, answer their questions, teach them Social status: increased visibility and opportunities to create new relationships Levels/progression: map the journey and progression towards a destination or just the journey Caretaking: looking after other Collaboration/ teams: working Certificates: meaningful and
    9. 9. The key to making gamification work online and in a club, district and worldwide Measure what matters most: Contribution
    10. 10. Contribution Can be measured in Time given to project, cause, club, district Money donated to project, cause or Rotary Foundation Can be tracked by Individual Club District Rotary International
    11. 11. Measure openly in leaderboards Why? As a young professional I want to spend my effort where I can see it make a difference So I can see as a club member how I contribute to my club. So we as a club can see how we contribute to the district. So the district can see it’s impact worldwide. So Rotary International can state openly how it contributes to the global community.
    12. 12. Effect of transparency • Clarity of purpose for each member and potential members • Increased engagement because nobody wants to be at the bottom of a leaderboard • Clubs will do more and projects will benefit more • Rotary will make a bigger difference
    13. 13. Contribution celebrations When leaderboards are kept up-to-date weekly following the meeting pattern of physical clubs, - They give instant feedback - Progress towards project goals - This allows for regular positive praise
    14. 14. Fun rewards for action End Polio campaign example: - Share ‘this much’ youtube clip on Twitter and Facebook Member earns Like badge and contribution points - Add your own picture and become a polio ambassador Member earns ‘this much’ badge and contribution point - Donate money Member earns ‘end polio money’ badge and contribution point Badges are virtual and collectible online or for real
    15. 15. Original rewards Some clubs have original campaigns for the End Polio cause such as: - Purple pinkie (school visits and children dip in purple ink to know immunization knowledge has been passed on) - Purple violet (plant and sell purple violets) - Wear purple day - Fun runs, etc. Allow clubs to design fun badges to go with their event and make them special collectibles
    16. 16. Special achievement circles • Rotary already has the Paul Harris award, which can be extended in levels – One time achiever – Extra-ordinary contribution (for large multi club/district international contributions) – Multiple achiever Levels encourage continued contributions from those already active givers
    17. 17. Visitor rewards • Rotarians are encouraged to visit other clubs when travelling for business and pleasure • Allow visitors to rate their visits upon their return with visitor rewards – – – – Warm welcome Friendly vibes & fun atmosphere Awesome Impressive work done by this club Visitors would have to substantiate their rating with a brief comment
    18. 18. Crowd-resourcing for projects Projects often need input from members of various clubs, by creating a resourcing page for a project so members in the club or other clubs can offer to contribute • Funds • Specialist skills • Manpower and time • Equipment, tools and materials
    19. 19. Have fun contributing!
    20. 20. This is a course assignment as part of the level 2 Gamification Design Expert from www.engagementalliance.org. Prepared by An Coppens October 2013

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