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D R . A M Y P I O T R O W S K I
A S S I S T A N T P R O F E S S O R O F S E C O N D A R Y
E D U C A T I O N A N D E N G L ...
The Problem
 Preservice teachers need to be introduced to
different technology tools and pedagogical
strategies for teach...
Research Questions
1. How do preservice English Language Arts
teachers construct their knowledge on the
different parts of...
The Problem
 How do preservice secondary English teachers
construct their knowledge of content, pedagogy, and
technology ...
Theoretical Framework
Reproduced by
permission of the
publisher, © 2012
by tpack.org
Previous Research
 Term “flipped classroom” coined by Baker (2000) when
he had students review Power Point slides before ...
Previous Research
 Research on preservice teachers and technology
integration suggests that instruction in technology
and...
Research Design
 Case study of nine undergraduate preservice
secondary English teachers who took an online
course focused...
Results
Results
 There was no pattern to participant’s knowledge
development on the TPACK framework –
participants used knowledge...
Results
 Participants made flipped lesson videos on:
 Plot structure and elements of fiction (3 participants)
 Argument...
Results
 When participants created their flipped lessons, they
all used familiar content they felt comfortable
teaching. ...
Results
 Participants saw potential for flipped learning in
secondary English classes. They thought that flipped
learning...
Results
 Participants saw saw potential drawbacks of
flipped learning as well. They were especially
concerned about stude...
Results
 Some participants said that they found recording
themselves on video to be strange
 Also, some participants sai...
Results
 Participants saw technology as a necessity in the
English classroom in order for students to be
successful in th...
Results
 Participants worried about keeping up with new
technologies when they became teachers – saw
technology as someth...
Results
 Participants said that one of the most beneficial
parts of the course was getting hands on experience
with techn...
Conclusions
 The findings of this study suggest that preservice
teachers benefit from gaining experience with
teaching me...
Current Work
 Preservice teachers created flipped lessons on a
young adult novel in an online YAL course
 Two participan...
Future Work
 Flipping distance English education and secondary
education courses taught synchronously through
interactive...
Questions?
 Contact Information
 Email: amy.piotrowski@usu.edu
 Twitter: @piotrowskiamy
 Website: amypiotrowski.com
References
 Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in
every class every day. Eugene, Or...
References
 Merriam, S. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and
implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bas...
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Piotrowski NCTE17 Flipped Presentation

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Flipped learning

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Piotrowski NCTE17 Flipped Presentation

  1. 1. D R . A M Y P I O T R O W S K I A S S I S T A N T P R O F E S S O R O F S E C O N D A R Y E D U C A T I O N A N D E N G L I S H E D U C A T I O N U T A H S T A T E U N I V E R S I T Y - U I N T A H B A S I N Preservice English Teachers’ Experiences With Flipped Learning
  2. 2. The Problem  Preservice teachers need to be introduced to different technology tools and pedagogical strategies for teaching their content with technology  Teacher education programs would do well to equip teachers with the multiple types of knowledge they need: content, pedagogy, and technology
  3. 3. Research Questions 1. How do preservice English Language Arts teachers construct their knowledge on the different parts of the TPACK framework? 2. How do preservice English Language Arts teachers utilize different kinds of knowledge as they learn to teach English with technology? 3. How does creating flipped lessons facilitate or not facilitate preservice English Language Arts teachers’ application of content knowledge and pedagogical knowledge to create lessons that use technology?
  4. 4. The Problem  How do preservice secondary English teachers construct their knowledge of content, pedagogy, and technology by creating flipped lessons?  I examined a course for undergraduates seeking licensure in secondary (grades 6-12) English. During this course, the undergraduates learned how to use digital technology tools to flip lessons
  5. 5. Theoretical Framework Reproduced by permission of the publisher, © 2012 by tpack.org
  6. 6. Previous Research  Term “flipped classroom” coined by Baker (2000) when he had students review Power Point slides before coming to class  Sams and Bergmann (2014) say that in flipped learning, “direct instruction is delivered individually, usually – though not exclusively – through teacher-created videos” It’s a “flexible technique to be used when appropriate to maximize face-to-face time with students”  Research on the flipped classroom suggests it is effective because it frees up time for active, hands-on learning
  7. 7. Previous Research  Research on preservice teachers and technology integration suggests that instruction in technology and teaching with technology benefits preservice teachers  Previous research on preservice English teachers found that the models of literacy presented by teacher educators affects the way preservice teachers think of literacy
  8. 8. Research Design  Case study of nine undergraduate preservice secondary English teachers who took an online course focused on teaching English with technology during Summer 2015  Participants were interviewed twice (before and after course), course assignments were collected, participants wrote three reflections during the course, I watched flipped lesson videos participants made for the course
  9. 9. Results
  10. 10. Results  There was no pattern to participant’s knowledge development on the TPACK framework – participants used knowledge from all parts of TPACK framework as needed throughout the course, not in steps or stages of development  Creating flipped lesson facilitated application of content knowledge but not learning of new content knowledge.
  11. 11. Results  Participants made flipped lesson videos on:  Plot structure and elements of fiction (3 participants)  Argumentation and analyzing arguments  Rhetoric and Unwind  Bitstrips response to Smile and resume writing  Literary devices  Rhetorical appeals  Writing a biography of a historical figure
  12. 12. Results  When participants created their flipped lessons, they all used familiar content they felt comfortable teaching. This content came from their previous coursework, from things they had seen their own high school teachers do, and from things they said they “liked.”  When learning a new teaching method, preservice teachers may want to teach content they’re comfortable with.
  13. 13. Results  Participants saw potential for flipped learning in secondary English classes. They thought that flipped learning could be used for a variety of lessons.  Participants said that flipped English lessons could potentially free up more time for discussion of literature and for time in class to write.
  14. 14. Results  Participants saw saw potential drawbacks of flipped learning as well. They were especially concerned about students not all having access to technology. This suggests that participants learned to consider the contexts of different schools and students that they may one day teach.
  15. 15. Results  Some participants said that they found recording themselves on video to be strange  Also, some participants said making the videos was a challenge because it left them without students asking questions to respond to
  16. 16. Results  Participants saw technology as a necessity in the English classroom in order for students to be successful in the 21st century, but they did not want to completely abandon traditional print-based literacy.  One participant said, “One goal of education is to provide students with skills they will be using outside of the classroom, and that includes digital literacy.”
  17. 17. Results  Participants worried about keeping up with new technologies when they became teachers – saw technology as something they would always need to learn more about so that their students wouldn’t fall behind.  One participant said, “While I want my students to try different styles/modes of reading and writing, standardized tests and colleges do not value this type of learning as much.”
  18. 18. Results  Participants said that one of the most beneficial parts of the course was getting hands on experience with technology tools that enable digital literacy practices  Several participants said that they wanted to go on to their fieldwork and student teaching to see how practicing English teachers use technology in the classroom to teach literacy to today’s students
  19. 19. Conclusions  The findings of this study suggest that preservice teachers benefit from gaining experience with teaching methods that integrate technology into classroom instruction.  Flipped lessons can be one instructional tool in a teacher’s toolbox, used when useful to the teacher and to the students.
  20. 20. Current Work  Preservice teachers created flipped lessons on a young adult novel in an online YAL course  Two participants created very different lessons: one encouraged students to make lots of personal connections to the novel Shadow and Bone while the other discussed types of characters and how to write a literary analysis focusing on a character in Buried Onions  Flipped learning is flexible method useful for a variety of approaches to teaching YAL
  21. 21. Future Work  Flipping distance English education and secondary education courses taught synchronously through interactive video broadcast  Focus class time on having students meet in small groups and practice teaching lessons using methods and strategies we have learned  Goal is to make broadcast classes more interactive and give students a chance to collaborate
  22. 22. Questions?  Contact Information  Email: amy.piotrowski@usu.edu  Twitter: @piotrowskiamy  Website: amypiotrowski.com
  23. 23. References  Bergmann, J. & Sams, A. (2012). Flip your classroom: Reach every student in every class every day. Eugene, Oregon: ISTE.  Coiro, J, Knobel, M, Lankshear, C., Leu, D. (2008). Central issues in new literacies and new literacies research. In J. Corio, M. Knobel, C. Lankshear, & D. Leu (Eds.), Handbook of research on new literacies (1-21). New York, NY: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.  Creswell, J. W. (2013). Qualitative inquiry and research design: Choosing among five approaches (3rd Ed.). Thousand Oakes, CA: SAGE Publications.  George, M., Pope, C., & Reid, L. (2015). Contemporary literacies and technologies in English language arts teacher education: Shift happens! Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 15(1), 1-13.  Jing, L. (2009). Digital natives as preservice teachers: What technology preparation is needed? Journal of Computing in Teacher Education, 25(3), 87-97.  Koehler, M. J., & Mishra, P. (2009). What is technological pedagogical content knowledge? Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education (CITE Journal), 9(1), 60-70.
  24. 24. References  Merriam, S. (2009). Qualitative research: A guide to design and implementation. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.  Miles, M., Huberman, A., M., & Saldaña, J. (2014). Qualitative data analysis: A methods sourcebook (3rd Ed.). Los Angeles, CA: SAGE.  Mishra, P. & Koehler, M.J. (2006). Technological pedagogical content knowledge: A framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record, 108(6), 1017-1054.  Patton, M. (1990). Qualitative evaluation and research methods. Beverly Hill, CA: SAGE.  Sams, A., & Bergmann, J. (2013). Flip your students’ learning. Educational Leadership, 70 (6), 16-20.  Shulman, L. (1986). Those who understand: Knowledge growth in teaching. Educational Researcher, 15(2), 4-14.  Tyner, K. (1998). Literacy in a digital world: Teaching and learning in the age of information. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.  Yin, R. (1984). Case study research. Beverly Hills, CA: SAGE

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