Observing And Recording Power Point

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  • Observing And Recording Power Point

    1. 2. WARM-UP What do you notice about your environment? Record your observations.
    2. 3. <ul><li>What did you observe? </li></ul><ul><li>What senses did you use? </li></ul><ul><li>What tools did you use? </li></ul><ul><li>What tools could you use to more detailed observations? </li></ul>Share & Discuss
    3. 4. KEY QUESTIONS
    4. 5. What observations do soccer players make during a game? What actions might they take, based on their observations? Observations are a way to gather information. Photo credit here © Corbis / Superstock
    5. 6. Observations can determine the difference between life and death. © Chris Johns/ National Geographic Images © James L. Stanfield / National Geographic Images
    6. 7. Powers of observation can vary greatly. Eagles have amazing eyesight. They can focus in two places at once, forward and to the side. Bloodhounds are superior sniffers. Millions of olfactory cells help them trace scents. Dolphins can “see” using feedback from soundwaves. This complex sensory system is known as echolocation . © Norbert Wu/Minden Pictures © Alaska Stock Images © James L. Stanfield / National Geographic Images
    7. 8. How have humans enhanced their powers of observation? © Mark Christmas / National Geographic Society © Dan Westergren/National Geographic Images; © David Doubillet / National Geographic Images;
    8. 9. KEY QUESTIONS
    9. 10. Take a look. Is this observation casual or scientific? © Gene J. Puskar/AP Images
    10. 11. <ul><li>Random </li></ul><ul><li>Inferred </li></ul><ul><li>Unsystematic </li></ul><ul><li>Not recorded </li></ul><ul><li>Missing specific details </li></ul><ul><li>(e.g. “It is cold outside.”) </li></ul>Casual Observations Can you think of an example of a casual observation?
    11. 12. <ul><li>Factual </li></ul><ul><li>Systematic, repeatable </li></ul><ul><li>Recorded </li></ul><ul><li>Shared </li></ul><ul><li>Quantifiable, when possible </li></ul><ul><li>Lead to the formation of questions and hypotheses </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed </li></ul><ul><li>(e.g. “The air temperature is 6 o Fahrenheit .”) </li></ul>Scientific Observations Can you think of an example of a scientific observation?
    12. 13. Take another look. Is this observation casual or scientific? © Gene J. Puskar/AP Images
    13. 14. KEY QUESTIONS
    14. 15. Here are some factors: <ul><li>Location </li></ul><ul><li>Duration </li></ul><ul><li>Time of year </li></ul><ul><li>Time of day </li></ul><ul><li>Experience </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Tools </li></ul><ul><li>Timing </li></ul>Can you think of any others? © David Cappaert; © Tim Layman/National Geographic Images; © Greg Marshall/National Geographic Society Remote Imaging
    15. 16. KEY QUESTIONS
    16. 17. Scientists use multiple techniques to record their observations. <ul><li>Describe it </li></ul><ul><li>Draw it </li></ul><ul><li>Graph it </li></ul><ul><li>Map it </li></ul><ul><li>Photograph it </li></ul><ul><li>Videotape it </li></ul><ul><li>Audiotape it </li></ul>Shown: Research on emperor penguin feeding behaviors. Data and images collected in Antarctica by Paul Ponganis and Greg Marshall.
    17. 18. Next, observations are interpreted. What can be learned from the graph? What do the images reveal? © Greg Marshall/National Geographic Society Remote Imaging
    18. 19. Now Try Again What do you notice about your environment? Practice making and recording scientific observations!
    19. 20. What did you observe? What senses did you use? Share & Discuss Did factors such as time, location, tools, or knowledge impact your observations? © David Doubilet/National Geographic Images

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