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Spending Your Calorie Salary for Teens

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Four part program from the University of Nebraska Extension teaching youth about healthy eating, portion sizes, physical activity, and making healthy food choices.

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  • This exciting and educational program will be a great teaching tool for you this fall as the school year begins again! The program covers Stay Within Your Calorie Budget!; “Essential” vs. “Extra” calories; Join the Portion Control Patrol; Move your feet more to eat more! You can use them as four separate teaching tools or as one program.
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Spending Your Calorie Salary for Teens

  1. 1. Images on this slide courtesy of NCI, Renee Comet, photographer, and the Microsoft Clip Art Gallery
  2. 2. Amy Peterson, MS RD University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension apeterson3@unl.edu Alice Henneman, MS RD University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension ahenneman1@unl.edu Save Time – Do More with our FREE educational resources:http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/educational-resources This publication has been peer-reviewed August 2012
  3. 3. ―If you don’t take care of yourbody, where are you going to live?‖ ~Author unknown
  4. 4. Today’s Lesson Plan1.Stay Within Your Calorie Budget!2.“Essential” vs. “Extra” calories3.Join the Portion Control Patrol4.Move your feet more to eat more!
  5. 5. Today’s Lesson Plan1.Stay Within Your Calorie Budget!2.“Essential” vs. “Extra” calories3.Join the Portion Control Patrol4.Move your feet more to eat more!
  6. 6. Budgeting your ―Calorie Salary‖Plan calories thesame as majorexpenses.What are yousaving for?
  7. 7. Or, you may have trouble ahead!
  8. 8. Build your foundation first!After you have a―foundation‖ builtaround MyPlate, ifyou have caloriesto spare in yourcalorie budget, thenyou can spendsome on extras
  9. 9. Food is to be enjoyed! ―Food is notnutritious untilits eaten.‖ ~ Smarter Lunchrooms 2011
  10. 10. Eat until ―satisfied,‖ not ―full‖―Your stomachshouldn’tbe a waist(waste)basket.‖~ Author Unknown
  11. 11. It takes about 20 minutes for 20 minutes stomach to tell your brain you’re full11
  12. 12. Think of the MyPlate guidelines as a ―calorie salary‖
  13. 13. 3,500 calories adds up to about 1 pound
  14. 14. Beware the cost of extra calories
  15. 15. Example of 100 calories
  16. 16. 6 cups microwave popcorn
  17. 17. 25 pieces candy covered chocolate candies
  18. 18. Example of 100 calories⅓ large (4-inch diameter) doughnut
  19. 19. Example of 100 calories ⅔ can of a regular soft drink
  20. 20. Average calories … 150 calories/12 oz. Regular Soda 240 calories/Medium Glazed Doughnut 200 calories/ 1.5 oz 460 calories/ Chocolate Bar medium order French Fries
  21. 21. ®The Latte Factor David Bach, author of The Automatic Millionaire, popularized the term Latte Factor® to demonstrate the power of saving a few dollars daily by forgoing unnecessary purchases
  22. 22. ® The Latte FactorOver severalyears, you cansave thousands ofdollars!When you saveby forgoingunnecessary food,you also savecalories!
  23. 23. Today’s Lesson Plan1.Stay Within Your Calorie Budget!2.“Essential” vs. “Extra” calories3.Join the Portion Control Patrol4.Move your feet more to eat more!
  24. 24. ―Essentials‖ ―Extras‖
  25. 25. ―Essential‖ vs. ―extra‖ calories―Essential‖calories are theminimumcalories neededto eat the foodsyour bodyneeds
  26. 26. ―Essential‖calories arelike carpayments.What happens if you skip car payments?
  27. 27. The best food ―buys‖ are foods with:No added sugar The least amount of fat, especially solid fat
  28. 28. Get the most for your ―calorie salary‖by eating more ―nutrient-dense‖ foods
  29. 29. Nutrient-dense foods providevitamins, minerals, and other beneficialsubstances while being relatively low incalories, and without solid fats (in or added tothe food) and without added sugars, refinedstarches, or sodium “Dietary Guidelines, 2010 at a Glance “PowerPoint, USDA CNPP
  30. 30. Nutrient-dense foods retain naturally occurring components, such as dietary fiberPhoto courtesy of National Cancer Institute, photographer unknown
  31. 31. All vegetables, fruits, whole grains, seafood,eggs, beans and peas, unsalted nuts andseeds, fat-free and low-fat dairy, and leanmeats and poultry are nutrient-dense whenprepared without solid fats or sugars
  32. 32. Nutrient-dense vs. not nutrient-dense300250200150 246100 138 calories 50 calories 0 Baked chicken breast Breaded fried chicken strips Nutrient-dense Not nutrient-dense
  33. 33. Nutrient-dense vs. not nutrient-dense200150100 246 138 calories 50 calories 0 Unsweetened Sweetened applesauce applesauce Nutrient-dense Not nutrient-dense
  34. 34. Nutrient-dense vs. not nutrient-dense250200150 236100 184 calories calories 50 0 90% lean ground beef 75% lean ground beef patty patty Nutrient-dense Not nutrient-dense
  35. 35. Choose MyPlate ―Menu‖Foods toincrease  Make half your plate fruits and vegetables  Make at least half your grains whole grains  Switch to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk
  36. 36. Pick a variety of vegetables from each vegetable subgroup
  37. 37. Fill half your plate with fruits & veggies
  38. 38. Overall dietary pattern is important Photo courtesy of USDAgov on flickr
  39. 39. ―For optimum health, scientists say eat a rainbow of colors. Your plate should look like a box of Crayolas.‖ ~Janice M. Horowitz, TIME, January 12, 2002
  40. 40. Did you know: The vegetable subgroup of ―beans and peas (legumes)‖ includes ...… all cookedbeans andpeas, forexample:  Kidney beans  Lentils  Chickpeas  Pinto beans
  41. 41. The ―beans and peas (legumes)‖ subgroup does NOT include ... Green peas Green beans
  42. 42. Can you guess: What type of food are ―beans and peas (legumes)‖ considered?A. VegetableB. ProteinC. Both A and BD. Neither A or B
  43. 43. Can you guess: What type of food are ―beans and peas (legumes)‖ considered?A. VegetableB. ProteinC. Both A and BD. Neither A or B
  44. 44. At least halfyour grainsshould bewhole grains
  45. 45. Can you guess: Which breadis highest in WHOLE grains?A. INGREDIENTS: wheatflour, water, high fructose cornsyrup, molasses, wheat, bran ...B. INGREDIENTS: whole wheatflour, water, brown sugar ...
  46. 46. Can you guess: Which breadis highest in WHOLE grains?A. INGREDIENTS: wheatflour, water, high fructose cornsyrup, molasses, wheat, bran ...B. INGREDIENTS: whole wheatflour, water, brown sugar ...
  47. 47. Switching to fat-free or low-fat (1%) milk makes a difference! Whole 2% 1% Fat-free 165 125 100 85 calories calories calories calories Calories 40 65 80 saved
  48. 48. Can you guess: Which is more nutrient-dense?A. Fat-free and low fat (1%) milkB. Whole milkC. They are equally nutrient-dense
  49. 49. Can you guess: Which is more nutrient-dense?A. Fat-free and low fat (1%) milkB. Whole milkC. They are equally nutrient-dense
  50. 50. Choose MyPlate ―Menu‖Foods to reduce  Compare sodium in foods like soup, bread, and frozen meals ― and choose the foods with lower numbers  Drink water instead of sugary drinks
  51. 51. Nutrition Facts Label doesn’t separate―added‖ & ―naturally occurring‖ sugars―Added‖ sugars aresugars and syrupsadded to foods orbeverages duringpreparation orprocessing1 teaspoon sugar =about 4g of addedand/or naturallyoccurring sugar
  52. 52. Other sugars occur ―naturally‖ in foods likemilk, fruit, and some vegetables – they aren’tthe ―added sugars‖ that are the concern
  53. 53. Can you guess: Which food has ADDED sugar according to the ingredient list?A. INGREDIENTS: cultured pasteurizedgrade A nonfat milk, whey proteinconcentrate, pectin ...B. INGREDIENTS: cultured grade Areduced fat milk, apples, high-fructosecorn syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, naturalflavors, pectin ...
  54. 54. Can you guess: Which food has ADDED sugar according to the ingredient list?A. INGREDIENTS: cultured pasteurizedgrade A nonfat milk, whey proteinconcentrate, pectin ...B. INGREDIENTS: cultured grade Areduced fat milk, apples, high-fructosecorn syrup, cinnamon, nutmeg, naturalflavors, pectin ...
  55. 55. Quick Math Lesson 1 teaspoon added sugar = about 20 calories 1 teaspoon solid fat = about 35 caloriesCheck ―Nutrition Facts‖labels for more specificcalorie counts andnutrition information.
  56. 56. Reduce sugar-sweetened beverage intake:  Drink fewer sugar- sweetened beverages  Consume smaller portions  Substitute water, unsweetened coffee and tea, and other beverages with few or no calories
  57. 57. Spend your ―calorie salary‖wisely to have ―extra‖ caloriesafter meeting ―essential‖nutrient needs.
  58. 58. ―Essential‖ vs. ―extra‖ calories―Extra‖ calories are likemoney left after carpayments and other―essential‖ spending. They’re like ―extra‖ money you can spend on things like movies and so on.
  59. 59. You can spend your ―extra‖ calories on: Foods with added sugar Foods higher in fat More foods from the MyPlate food groups
  60. 60. Total ―extra‖ calories range from about 100 to 700 calories YOUR level depends on:  Age  Gender  Activity level
  61. 61. Find on the next slides … 1. Approximate total calories YOU need 2. About how many of YOUR total calories can be spent on ―extras‖
  62. 62. Calories for 9 - 13 yearsFemales Not 1600 active 130 Active 1600 – 2000 130 - 290Males Not 1800 active 195 Active 1800 - 2600 195 - 410 Extra Total
  63. 63. Calories for 14 - 18 yearsFemales Not 1800 active 195 Active 2000 – 2400Males 265 - 360 Not 2200 active 290 2400 - 3200 Active 360 - 650 Calories Extra Total
  64. 64. Food tastes boring without a little salt….But how much is too much??
  65. 65. Can you guess: People ages 2 and older should reduce daily sodium intake to less than …A. 2,300 mg or 1,500 mg, depending onage/other individual characteristicsB. 2,300 mg or 3,000 mg, depending onage/other individual characteristics
  66. 66. Can you guess: People ages 2 and older should reduce daily sodium intake to less than …A. 2,300 mg or 1,500 mg, depending onage/other individual characteristicsB. 2,300 mg or 3,000 mg, depending onage/other individual characteristics
  67. 67. Groups reduced to 1,500 mg African Americans ages 2+ Adults ages 51+ People ages 2+ with high blood pressure, diabetes, or chronic kidney disease
  68. 68. Can you guess: How muchsodium is in a teaspoon of salt?A. 1,300 mgB. 2,300 mgC. 3,300 mg
  69. 69. Can you guess: How muchsodium is in a teaspoon of salt?A. 1,300 mgB. 2,300 mgC. 3,300 mg
  70. 70. Can you guess: How muchsodium is in 1 cup of this food?A. 30 mgB. 250 mgC. 470 mg
  71. 71. Can you guess: How muchsodium is in 1 cup of this food?A. 30 mgB. 250 mgC. 470 mg
  72. 72. Easy ways to reduce sodium Check labels Try to avoid a lot of pre-packed foods high in sodium Avoid adding salt (an exception may be when baking yeast breads) Eat fresh foods, frozen veggies Request salt be left off when eating out Use other seasonings
  73. 73. Today’s Lesson Plan1.Stay Within Your Calorie Budget!2.“Essential” vs. “Extra” calories3.Join the Portion Control Patrol4.Move your feet more to eat more!
  74. 74. As portion sizes have gotten larger over the years, so have we!
  75. 75. Largerportionsadd up!
  76. 76. Beware of the cost of extra calories
  77. 77. Maintaining a healthy weight is a balancing act
  78. 78. Portion distortion over the years Food portion sizes have changed in 25 years. Slides marked by this icon are adapted from “Portion Distortion” by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute at http://hin.nhlbi.nih.gov/portion
  79. 79. Portion distortion The following illustrations are representative of comparative sizes.Calories expended by various physicalactivities are approximations and will vary with age, gender, height/weight, and intensity of the activity. Several different weights are used as examples in the following slides.
  80. 80. Guess the calorie difference! 25 Years Ago Today 3-inch diameter 6-inch diameter Blueberry bagel photo courtesy of pengrim™ at http://flic.kr/p/41qvEZ under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommerical license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/
  81. 81. Guess the calorie difference!140 calories 350 calories 210 more calories
  82. 82. How long would you have to playbasketball to burn 210 more calories?
  83. 83. How long would you have to playbasketball to burn 210 more calories? 30 minutes Calorie Calculations: http://www.nutribase.com/exercala.htm Based on 160-pound person
  84. 84. Guess the calorie difference! 20 Years Ago Today 1 cups spaghetti 2 cups spaghetti with sauce & with sauce & 3 small meatballs 3 large meatballs
  85. 85. Guess the calorie difference!500 calories 1,025 calories 525 more calories
  86. 86. How long would you have to jog to burn 525 more calories?
  87. 87. How long would you have to jog to burn 525 more calories? 60 minutes* based on 12 minutes/mile Calorie Calculations: http://www.nutribase.com/exercala.htm Based on 140-pound person
  88. 88. Guess the calorie difference!20 Years Ago Today2.4 ounces 6.9 ounces
  89. 89. Guess the calorie difference!210 calories 610 calories 400 more calories
  90. 90. How long would you have to walkleisurely to burn 400 more calories?
  91. 91. How long would you have to walkleisurely to burn 400 more calories? 1 hour and 10 minutes Based on 160-pound person
  92. 92. Guess the calorie difference! 20 Years Ago Today 6.5-oz. soda 20-oz. soda
  93. 93. Guess the calorie difference! 85 calories 250 calories 165 more calories
  94. 94. How long would you have todance to burn 165 more calories?
  95. 95. How long would you have todance to burn 165 more calories? 30 minutes Calorie Calculations: http://www.nutribase.com/exercala.htm Based on 140-pound person
  96. 96. Guess the calorie difference!20 Years Ago Today
  97. 97. Guess the calorie difference!333 calories 590 calories 257 more calories
  98. 98. How long would you have to liftweights to burn 257 more calories?
  99. 99. How long would you have to liftweights to burn 257 more calories? 1 hour and 30 minutes Calorie Calculations: http://www.nutribase.com/exercala.htm Based on 130-pound person
  100. 100. Guess the calorie difference! 20 Years Ago Today Coffee, 8 oz. Mocha coffee, 16 oz.(with whole milk & sugar) (with steamed whole milk & mocha syrup) Large coffee image courtesy of renee_mcgurk (Renee McGurk) at http://flic.kr/p/9agbB4 under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/
  101. 101. Guess the calorie difference! 45 calories 350 calories 305 more calories
  102. 102. How long would you have tobackpack to burn 305 more calories?
  103. 103. How long would you have tobackpack to burn 305 more calories? 30 minutes carrying a 10 pound load Calorie Calculations: http://www.nutribase.com/exercala.htm Based on 170-pound person
  104. 104. Guess the calorie difference! 20 Years Ago Today 1.5 ounces 4 ounces
  105. 105. Guess the calorie difference! 210 calories 500 calories 290 more calories
  106. 106. How long would you have to playvolleyball to burn 290 more calories?
  107. 107. How long would you have to playvolleyball to burn 290 more calories? 1 hour game Calorie Calculations: http://www.nutribase.com/exercala.htm Based on 120-pound person
  108. 108. Guess the calorie difference!20 Years Ago Today 5 cups 11 cups
  109. 109. Guess the calorie difference!270 calories 630 calories 360 more calories
  110. 110. How long would you have to swim to burn 360 more calories?
  111. 111. How long would you have to do swim to burn 360 more calories? 30 minutes at 50 yards a minute! Calorie Calculations: http://www.nutribase.com/exercala.htm Based on 160-pound person
  112. 112. Guess the calorie difference!20 Years Ago Today
  113. 113. Guess the calorie difference! 500 calories 850 calories 350 extra calories
  114. 114. How long would you have to golf(walking & carrying clubs) to burn 350 more calories?
  115. 115. How long would you have to golf(walking & carrying clubs) to burn 350 more calories? 1 hour Based on 160-pound person
  116. 116. ―You better cut the pizza in four pieces, because I’m not hungry enough to eat six.‖ ~Yogi Berra, former American Major League baseball player
  117. 117. Guess the calorie difference!20 Years Ago Today 1.5 inch diameter 3.5 inch diameter Small cookie photo courtesy of National Cancer Institute / Renee Comet, Photographer
  118. 118. Guess the calorie difference! 55 calories 275 calories 220 more calories
  119. 119. How long would you have to washthe car to burn 220 more calories?
  120. 120. How long would you have to washthe car to burn 220 more calories? 1 hour and 15 minutes Based on 130-pound person
  121. 121. ―A balanced diet is a cookie in each hand‖ ~Author unknown Unfortunately … NOT!
  122. 122. Keep an ―eye‖ on your food portion sizes
  123. 123. Portion sizes: Cheese1 ounce of cheese = 4 stacked dice
  124. 124. Portion sizes: Meat or Poultry 3 oz. cooked = a deck of cards
  125. 125. Portion sizes: Fish3 oz. cooked = a check book
  126. 126. Portion sizes: ½ and 1 cup1 cup = 1 baseball½ cup = ½ baseball
  127. 127. Portion sizes:1 teaspoon & 1 tablespoon 1 teaspoon = the tip of a thumb to the first joint 1 tablespoon = 3 thumb tips
  128. 128. Using a smaller plate, bowl, or glass can help you eat less This cup of cereal looks like129 more in the smaller bowl.
  129. 129. When possible, know how much you’reeating by dishing up a portion of food vs. eating directly from the container
  130. 130. Start with a smaller portion — have more if you’re still hungry131
  131. 131. Cut portions by sharingrestaurant meals — especially desserts — with others
  132. 132. Ask for a ―to-go‖ box and take part of your restaurant meal home (refrigerate within 2 hours) Photo courtesy of National Cancer Institute, Renee Comet, photographer
  133. 133. Be an able label readerCheck the sizeand number ofservings … ifyou drank thisentire 20 oz.beverage, youwould consume250 calories! 100 calories x 2.5 servings = 250 calories
  134. 134. Be an able label readerCheck the sizeand number ofservings … ifyou drank thisentire 20 oz.beverage, youwould consume250 calories! 100 calories x 2.5 servings = 250 calories
  135. 135. Today’s Lesson Plan1.Stay Within Your Calorie Budget!2.“Essential” vs. “Extra” calories3.Join the Portion Control Patrol4.Move your feet more to eat more!
  136. 136. Balance food calorieswith physical activity level
  137. 137. Recommended minimum levelsof physical activity for kids, tweens, and teens: 6-17 years 60 minutes daily of moderate and vigorous activity
  138. 138. Moderateaerobicactivitymoderatelyincreasesheart rateandbreathing
  139. 139. Vigorousaerobicactivitygreatlyincreasesheart rateandbreathing
  140. 140. Short on time?Get up andget moving! Even 10minutes ofactivity can count!
  141. 141. NOT a solution!―Whenever I feel the need to exercise, I lie down until it goes away.‖~ Robert Maynard Hutchins
  142. 142. Raise your hand for each activity that fitsyour lifestyle …11 ways to get physically active without going to the gym
  143. 143. Ways to increase physical activity Walk up and down the soccer or softball field sidelines while waiting to play or practice
  144. 144. Ways to increase physical activity Replace a soda break with a brisk walk
  145. 145. Ways to increase physical activity Take abrisk walk around the mall BEFOREyou shop
  146. 146. Ways to increase physical activity Use the stairs as much as possible … even if you don’t need anything upstairs or downstairs!
  147. 147. Ways to increase physical activity Stand while you’re on the phone
  148. 148. Ways to increase physical activity Walk while waiting around
  149. 149. Ways to increase physical activityGet off the bus or out of your car a distance from yourdestination andwalk the rest of the way
  150. 150. Ways to increase physical activity Use your exercise bicycle or treadmill while watching TV151
  151. 151. Ways to increase physical activity Your parents willSpeed appreciate it!clean yourroom! © Monkey Business - Fotolia.com
  152. 152. Choose shoes that promote walking (at leastsome of the time!)
  153. 153. Take me for a walk … don’tjust watch me walk!
  154. 154. Most important — have fun while being active!
  155. 155. And … don’t go to extremes unless you know what you’re doing!!!
  156. 156. Quick Quiz
  157. 157. At least 60 minutes, 10 minutes ormore at a time
  158. 158. Have funMost important … while being active!
  159. 159. Giveyourself a hand if you’rephysically active at least 60 minutes a day!
  160. 160. A final thought …―Never eat more than you can lift.‖ ~Miss Piggy, the Muppet
  161. 161. THE END―The greatest wealth is health.‖ ~Virgil
  162. 162. Thank You to the following Peer Reviewers (in alphabetical order). Your time and expertise was greatly appreciated! • Mary Abbott, RD • Whitney Ceas, RD, LMNT • Karen Erdman, DTR • Ann Fenton, MS • Susan Hansen, MS • Alice Henneman, MS, RD • Cathy Merickel, MS, RD, LD • Nannette Rankin, RD • Natali Shei, MS, RD • Karen Siebe, MS, RD, LMNT • Kathi Taylor, RD • Kayte Tranel, MS, RD • Joyce White, RD
  163. 163. Extension is a Division of the Institute ofAgriculture and Natural Resources at theUniversity of Nebraska–Lincoln cooperatingwith the Counties and the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture.University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extensioneducational programs abide with thenondiscrimination policies of the University ofNebraska–Lincoln and the United StatesDepartment of Agriculture.

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