Cold Pizza for Breakfast - Food Safety Tips for Teens

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The program covers Foodborne Illness Facts, MyPlate Food Safety Recommendations, and the Food Safety interactive quiz, “Keep or Toss’! There is also supplemental information on thermometer usage and food safety issues specific to seafood. It is a great resource to offer to middle and high school audiences as they learn to do more food preparation independently, BEFORE they leave the pizza out on the counter overnight!

Great for Extension Educators, RD's, teachers and anyone who wants to prepare and enjoy food safely. Developed by University of Nebraska Extension Educators Amy Peterson RD and Alice Henneman RD.

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Cold Pizza for Breakfast - Food Safety Tips for Teens

  1. 1. Teacher Tips • Review PowerPoint in the “Slide Show” mode before showing it. The slides may appear differently on various computers. • Divide PowerPoint into more than one presentation, depending on your group. Several “courses” are identified. • Personalize by adding or deleting slides.
  2. 2. Download this PowerPoint at: http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/educational-resources
  3. 3. Alice Henneman, MS RD University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension ahenneman1@unl.edu Save Time – Do More with our FREE educational resources: http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/educational-resources This publication has been peer-reviewed ● April 2014 Amy Peterson, MS RD University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension apeterson3@unl.edu
  4. 4. Menu 1. Foodborne Illness Facts 2. Clean 3. Separate 4. Cook 5. Chill 6. Game — Keep or Toss?
  5. 5. Menu 1. Foodborne Illness Facts 2. Clean 3. Separate 4. Cook 5. Chill 6. Game — Keep or Toss?
  6. 6. How many people in the United States get sick each year from food they eat? 48 million people become sick from foodborne illnesses 3,000 people die SOURCE: http://mednews.com/food-illness-statistics-2010-cd
  7. 7. How do you know if YOU have a foodborne illness? 8
  8. 8. Signs and symptoms of foodborne illness ...
  9. 9. Vomiting
  10. 10. Dehydration
  11. 11. Possible more severe conditions ...
  12. 12. Meningitis
  13. 13. Paralysis
  14. 14. Sometimes you can become very sick and may have to stay in the hospital a couple of weeks or longer!
  15. 15. You can’t always spot spoiled food by using these 3 senses – what are they? Sight Smell
  16. 16. Even IF tasting would tell … Why risk getting sick? A “tiny taste” may not protect you … Yuk! … as few as 10 bacteria could make you sick!
  17. 17. Foodborne illness is NOT a pretty picture! 22 Hey guys, I need to throw up!
  18. 18. How long does it take to get sick after eating unsafe food? It can take ½ hour to 6 weeks to become sick from unsafe foods. You usually feel OK right after eating and become sick later.
  19. 19. Not everyone who eats the same food gets sick! 24 I’m feeling sick …was it something I ate? How come no one else feels sick?
  20. 20. People with a higher risk for foodborne illness include ...
  21. 21. Infants
  22. 22. Pregnant women
  23. 23. Young children and older adults
  24. 24. People already weakened by another disease or treatment for a disease
  25. 25. People with a higher risk of foodborne illness should be especially careful to avoid these potentially hazardous foods …
  26. 26. 31 Raw and undercooked meat and poultry Raw or partially cooked eggs and foods containing raw eggs Unpasteurized juices, milk, or milk products Raw sprouts
  27. 27. It’s not fun to have a foodborne illness! 32 You got that right!
  28. 28. Be a Winner! Increase your chances of preventing foodborne illness!
  29. 29. Choose MyPlate Food Safety Recommendations • Clean • Separate • Cook • Chill Source: http://www.choosemyplate.gov/healthy-eating-tips/food-safety-advice.html
  30. 30. Choosemyplate.gov food safety recommendations are for home-cooking If you work in foodservice, such as in a restaurant, different guidelines for cooking and refrigerator temperatures may apply. These follow national standards and are set by your health department. PHOTO SOURCE http://www.dreamstime.com/
  31. 31. 36 Part of the reason for the differences is that foods might be delivered, cooked and cooled differently in different food service places
  32. 32. Menu 1. Foodborne Illness Facts 2. Clean 3. Separate 4. Cook 5. Chill 6. Game — Keep or Toss?
  33. 33. Do this first before you cook!
  34. 34. The 10 most common causes of infection
  35. 35. Handwashing is the most effective way to stop the spread of illness 5 handwashing steps follow ...
  36. 36. Wet hands with WARM water
  37. 37. Soap and scrub for 20 seconds
  38. 38. Rinse under clean, running water
  39. 39. Dry completely using a clean cloth or paper towel
  40. 40. Turn off water with paper towel
  41. 41. Wash hands after …
  42. 42. Handling pets
  43. 43. Using the bathroom or changing diapers
  44. 44. Sneezing, blowing nose, and coughing
  45. 45. Touching a cut or open sore
  46. 46. Before AND after eating and handling food
  47. 47. Clean during food preparation! Wash cutting boards, knives, utensils and counter tops with hot soapy water after preparing each food and before going on to the next.
  48. 48. Avoid spreading bacteria! Use paper towels or clean dishcloths to wipe up kitchen surfaces or spills.
  49. 49. 54 Wash dishcloths often on the hot cycle of the washing machine and dry in a hot dryer.
  50. 50. Dirty dishcloths spread bacteria Bacteria like to grow in wet or damp dishcloths and sponges Have lots of dishcloths or sponges so you can change them frequently!
  51. 51. There are more germs in the average kitchen than the bathroom. Sponges and dishcloths are the worst offenders. ~research by Dr. Charles Gerba PhotoSource:freedigitalphotobyVictorHabbick
  52. 52. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Let’s examine some pathogens found on common objects….
  53. 53. Pathogens that grew from a clean wash cloth 58
  54. 54. Pathogens that grew from a cloth used during meal preparation 59
  55. 55. Pathogens that grew from clean hands 60
  56. 56. Pathogens that grew from hands that were coughed on 61
  57. 57. Pathogens that grew from unwashed hands from the playground 62
  58. 58. Cleaning fruits & vegetables Remove and discard outer leaves. Rinse under clean, running water just before preparing or eating. Rub briskly, scrubbing with a clean brush or hands to remove dirt and surface microorganisms.
  59. 59. 64 Don’t use soap or detergent. Unlike washing dishes, some soap or detergent may remain in fruits and vegetables and make you sick! PhotocreditFreedigitalphotos.net-Winnond
  60. 60. Cleaning fruits & vegetables After washing, dry with a clean cloth or paper towel. Cut away bruised and damaged areas.
  61. 61. Wash this produce, too! Bacteria on the outside of fruits can be transferred to the inside when the fruit is peeled or cut.
  62. 62. Read labels Read labels on bagged produce to learn if it is ready-to-eat. Ready-to-eat, prewashed, bagged produce can be used without further washing if kept refrigerated and used by the “use-by” date.
  63. 63. Avoid washing raw meat & poultry … Washing increases the danger of cross-contamination. Bacteria present on the surface of meat and poultry can be spread to ready-to-eat foods, kitchen utensils and counter surfaces.
  64. 64. Menu 1. Foodborne Illness Facts 2. Clean 3. Separate 4. Cook 5. Chill 6. Game — Keep or Toss?
  65. 65. This prevents bacteria on one food from making another food unsafe to eat!
  66. 66. Use different cutting boards Use one cutting board for raw meat, poultry, and seafood … and a separate one for fresh produce.
  67. 67. PhotoSource:freedigitalphotobyaopsan Why should you replace cutting boards if they become worn or develop grooves?
  68. 68. When groovy isn’t a good thing It’s harder to clean a board that has grooves where bacteria can hide! PhotoSource:freedigitalphotobyaopsan
  69. 69. Use clean plates NEVER serve foods on a plate that previously held raw meat, poultry or seafood unless the plate has first been washed in hot, soapy water. 74
  70. 70. Menu 1. Foodborne Illness Facts 2. Clean 3. Separate 4. Cook 5. Chill 6. Game — Keep or Toss?
  71. 71. COOK foods to a safe temperature to kill microorganisms. “Microorganisms” means things like bacteria.
  72. 72. Which ground beef patty is cooked to a safe internal temperature? Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/food/therm/researchfs.htm
  73. 73. This IS a safely cooked hamburger, cooked to an internal temperature of 160°F, even though it's pink inside. This is NOT a safely cooked hamburger. Though brown inside, it’s undercooked. Research shows some ground beef patties look done at internal temperatures as low as 135°F. Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/food/therm/researchfs.htm
  74. 74. 1 out of 4 hamburgers turns brown before it has been cooked to a safe internal temperature Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.pueblo.gsa.gov/cic_text/food/therm/researchfs.htm
  75. 75. Types of food thermometers digital instant-read dial oven-safe oven probe with cord disposable temperature indicators thermometer fork combination dial instant-read Read the instructions for YOUR thermometer.
  76. 76. Placing a food thermometer 1. Place in thickest part of food. 2. Do NOT touch bone, fat, or gristle. 3. Begin checking temperature toward end of cooking, but before food is expected to be "done." 4. For irregularly shaped food, check the temperature in several places. Clean thermometer with hot soapy water before and after each use!
  77. 77. Using a thermometer in thinner foods Insert a thermometer at an angle or from the side for really thin foods like meat patties, pork chops and chicken breasts. When grilling or frying, to avoid burning fingers, it may be helpful to remove the food from the heat source before inserting the thermometer!
  78. 78. Here are the temperatures for cooking some foods …
  79. 79. Chicken and turkey Cook chicken and turkey (both whole birds and poultry parts, such as wings, breasts, legs and thighs, etc.) to 165°F.
  80. 80. Pork Cook pork, roasts, and chops to 145 ºF as measured with a food thermometer, then allow the meat to rest for three minutes before carving or consuming. http://blogs.usda.gov/2011/05/25/cooking-meat-check-the-new-recommended-temperatures/
  81. 81. Pork, egg dishes, hamburger & ground meats Cook egg dishes, hamburger and ground meats to 160°F. Cook ground poultry to 165°F.
  82. 82. You can’t stick a thermometer into a scrambled or fried egg. Scrambled, poached, fried and hard-cooked eggs are safe when cooked so both yolks and whites are firm, not runny. How do you know when they’re done?
  83. 83. Leftovers Reheat leftovers until a temperature of 165°F is reached throughout the food.
  84. 84. Beef, lamb & veal steaks Cook beef, lamb and veal steaks and roasts to 160°F for medium doneness (145°F for medium rare, with a 3 minute rest time).
  85. 85. What is Rest Time? “Rest time” is the amount of time the product remains at the final temperature, after it has been removed from a grill, oven or other heat source. During the three minutes after meat is removed the heat source, its temperature remains constant or continues to rise, which destroys harmful bacteria.
  86. 86. 92
  87. 87. Menu 1. Foodborne Illness Facts 2. Clean 3. Separate 4. Cook 5. Chill 6. Game — Keep or Toss?
  88. 88. CHILL (refrigerate) “perishable” foods promptly and defrost foods properly.
  89. 89. What foods are “perishable” and spoil more readily? Dairy products Pasta, rice, cooked vegetables Fresh, peeled/cut fruits and vegetables Meat, poultry, fish, eggs, tofu Photos: watermelon, potato, and rice are from NCI / photographer: Renee Comet
  90. 90. Does anyone know the “TWO-hour rule”? 96
  91. 91. The TWO-hour rule Refrigerate perishable foods so TOTAL time at room temperature is less than TWO hours (Only ONE hour when temperature is above 90°F)
  92. 92. A Multiplication Quiz How many bacteria will grow from 1 BACTERIA left at room temperature 7 hours? The number of bacteria can double in 20 minutes!
  93. 93. Answer: 2,097,152! Refrigerate perishable foods within TWO hours!
  94. 94. 100 How to be Cool – Part 1 Place very hot foods on a rack at room temperature for about 20 minutes before putting them in the refrigerator. Cool food in shallow containers. Limit depth of food to 2 inches or less.
  95. 95. How to be Cool – Part 2 It’s OK to refrigerate foods while they are still warm. Leave container cover slightly cracked until the food has cooled.
  96. 96. What temperatures are recommended for refrigerator and freezer? 102 0 o F 40 o F
  97. 97. Place an appliance thermometer in the refrigerator AND freezer!
  98. 98. Monitor refrigerator & freezer temperatures Place thermometer in the front of refrigerator/freezer in an easy-to-read location. Check temperature regularly – at least once a week!
  99. 99. 105 The THAW LAW Plan ahead to defrost foods. The best way to thaw perishable foods is in the refrigerator!
  100. 100. Refrigerator Storage Store raw meat, poultry and seafood on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator so juices don’t drip onto other foods.
  101. 101. Don’t do this, even if your food is kept in the refrigerator! Photo credit Freedigitalphotos.net - Ambro
  102. 102. How long should you keep leftover food? Refrigerated leftovers may become unsafe within 3 to 4 days.
  103. 103. 109 http://www.4daythrowaway.org
  104. 104. Menu 1. Foodborne Illness Facts 2. Clean 3. Separate 4. Cook 5. Chill 6. Game — Keep or Toss?
  105. 105. Keep OR Toss!
  106. 106. Should you KEEP or TOSS … Tacos left on the kitchen counter overnight?
  107. 107. Toss it out! Photo credit Freedigitalphotos.net – m_bartosch
  108. 108. Toss it out! 115 A toxin is something that can make you sick. The type of sickness depends on the type of bacteria forming the toxin. Even if you reheat tacos left out overnight, some bacteria can form a heat-resistant toxin which cooking won’t destroy.
  109. 109. Hamburger thawed all day on the kitchen counter? Should you KEEP or TOSS … Photo credit FoodPhotoSite.com
  110. 110. Toss it out!
  111. 111. 118 Thaw packages of meat, poultry and seafood on a plate on the bottom shelf of the refrigerator. This prevents their juices from dripping on other foods.
  112. 112. Remember how bacteria may have formed heat- resistant toxins when tacos were left out more than TWO hours?
  113. 113. 120
  114. 114. Leftover pizza which was stored in the refrigerator within TWO hours after it was served? PHOTOSOURCE:FreeDigitalPhotos.netbyDavidCastilloDominici
  115. 115. KEEP IT!
  116. 116. If perishable foods are refrigerated within TWO hours after they are served, they should be safe. Just eat them within 3 to 4 days. PhotocreditFreedigitalphotos.net–stockimages
  117. 117. 124 Leftover cold pizza can be a GREAT breakfast food — IF you handle it safely! PhotocreditFreedigitalphotos.net–Ambro
  118. 118. Should you KEEP or TOSS … Cut or peeled fruits and vegetables left at room temperature for more than TWO hours?
  119. 119. Toss it out!
  120. 120. Toss it out!
  121. 121. Should you KEEP or TOSS … Leftovers kept in the refrigerator for over a week?
  122. 122. Toss it out!
  123. 123. Toss it out! Even refrigerated leftovers may become unsafe within 3 to 4 days.
  124. 124. You can’t always see or smell if a food is unsafe. You could get sick tasting a food!
  125. 125. Should you KEEP or TOSS … A pot of chili soup stored in the refrigerator while still hot?
  126. 126. And….can you guess…. How long would it take a pot of chili to cool to a safe temperature in your refrigerator? Would you believe … at least 24 hours!
  127. 127. Toss it out!
  128. 128. Toss it out! Transfer hot foods to shallow containers to speed cooling! COOL!
  129. 129. Remember:
  130. 130. 138University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension educational programs abide with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture.
  131. 131. An Extra Helping For Teachers • Thermometers • Safely Cooked Seafood The following slides provide more information than many students need. Insert into the slide set if you feel they would be helpful to your classes.
  132. 132. An Extra Helping For Teachers Thermometers
  133. 133. DIGITAL instant-read • Reads in 10 seconds • Place at least ½ inch deep (or as directed by manufacturer) • Gives fast reading • Can measure temperature in thin and thick foods • Not designed to remain in food while it's cooking • Check internal temperature of food near the end of cooking time • Some models can be calibrated; check manufacturer's instructions • Available in "kitchen" stores Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.fsis.usda.gov/food_safety_education/Types_of_Food_Thermometers/index.asp
  134. 134. DIAL instant-read • Reads in 15-20 seconds • Place 2-2½ inches deep in thickest part of food • Can be used in roasts, casseroles, and soups • Temperature is averaged along probe, from tip to 2-3 inches up the stem • Cannot measure thin foods unless inserted sideways • Not designed to remain in food while it is cooking • Use to check the internal temperature of a food at the end of cooking time • Some models can be calibrated; check manufacturer's instructions • Readily available in stores Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.fsis.usda.gov/food_safety_education/Types_of_Food_Thermometers/index.asp
  135. 135. Dial oven-safe • Reads in 1-2 minutes • Place 2-2½ inches deep in thickest part of food • Can be used in roasts, casseroles, and soups • Not appropriate for thin foods • Can remain in food while it's cooking • Heat conduction of metal stem can cause false high reading • Some models can be calibrated; check manufacturer's instructions Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.fsis.usda.gov/food_safety_education/Types_of_Food_Thermometers/index.asp
  136. 136. Oven probe with cord • Can be used in most foods • Can also be used outside the oven • Designed to remain in the food while it is cooking in oven or in covered pot • Base unit sits on stovetop or counter • Cannot be calibrated Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.fsis.usda.gov/food_safety_education/Types_of_Food_Thermometers/index.asp
  137. 137. Disposable temperature indicators (Single-use) • Reads in 5-10 seconds • Place approximately ½ inch deep (follow manufacturer's directions) • Designed to be used only once • Designed for specific temperature ranges • Should only be used with food for which the thermometer is intended • Temperature-sensitive material changes color when the desired temperature is reached Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.fsis.usda.gov/food_safety_education/Types_of_Food_Thermometers/index.asp
  138. 138. Thermometer-fork combination • Reads in 2-10 seconds • Place at least ¼ inch deep in thickest part of food • Can be used in most foods • Not designed to remain in food while it is cooking • Sensor in tine of fork must be fully inserted • Check internal temperature of food near end of cooking time • Cannot be calibrated • Convenient for grilling Source: United States Department of Agriculture/Food Safety & Inspection Service http://www.fsis.usda.gov/food_safety_education/Types_of_Food_Thermometers/index.asp
  139. 139. An Extra Helping For Teachers Fresh and Frozen Seafood: Selecting and Serving It Safely http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm077331.htm
  140. 140. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFbY2aewd4w Watch a video on Seafood Safety from the U.S. Food and Drug Association
  141. 141. Signs of safely cooked seafood: Fin Fish • Slip point of sharp knife into flesh; pull aside. • Edges should be opaque, the center slightly translucent with flakes beginning to separate. • Let stand 3 to 4 minutes to finish cooking. Source: United States Food & Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm077331.htm Fin Fish
  142. 142. Signs of safely cooked seafood: Shrimp, lobster & crab Turn red and flesh becomes pearly opaque. Source: United States Food & Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm077331.htm
  143. 143. Signs of safely cooked seafood: Scallops Turn milky white or opaque and firm. Source: United States Food & Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm077331.htm
  144. 144. Signs of safely cooked seafood: Clams, mussels & oysters Watch for their shells opening to know they’re done. Toss those that stay closed. Clams Mussels Oysters Source: United States Food & Drug Administration http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm077331.htm
  145. 145. Specific group recommendations for seafood safety These groups should avoid some types of fish and eat types lower in mercury • Pregnant women and those who may become pregnant • Nursing mothers • Young children For more information: http://www.fda.gov/food/resourcesforyou/consumers/ucm077331.htm or call 1-888-SAFEFOOD
  146. 146. Extension is a Division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln cooperating with the Counties and the United States Department of Agriculture. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programs abide with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture.

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