Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

The Highwayman and Annabel Lee: Forms and Structures

5,040 views

Published on

Published in: Education
  • Be the first to comment

The Highwayman and Annabel Lee: Forms and Structures

  1. 1. Poems that Tell Stories: “The Highwayman” and “Annabel Lee”
  2. 2. Common Core Focus Standards • Reading Literature 7.5 Analyze how a poem’s form or structure contributes to its meaning. • Reading Literature 7.7 Compare and contrast a text to an audio, video, or multimedia version. • Reading Literature 7.4 Determine the meaning of words or phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative and connotative; analyze the impact of rhymes and other repetitions of sounds on a specific stanza of a poem.
  3. 3. Check Prior Knowledge What do you already know about highwaymen?
  4. 4. Thinking Routine (Making Connections): Use these slides of art work to create a story of how this paintings connect.
  5. 5. Connection game: Take these slides of art work to add to your connection story of how this paintings connect. Thinking Routine
  6. 6. Background The highwayman in this famous poem is a robber who lived in England in the 1700s. Highwaymen used to stop stagecoaches on the lonely moorlands of northern England and Scotland to rob the rich passengers of money and jewels. Some highwaymen were considered heroes by the Scots because they shared the money with the poor. Highwaymen were sometimes dashing, romantic figures who dressed in expensive clothes. The poem is based on a true story that the poet heard while he was on vacation in the part of England where highwaymen used to lie in wait for stagecoaches.
  7. 7. The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes (p. 161) The wind was a torrent of darkness upon the gusty trees, The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, The road was a ribbon of moonlight looping the purple moor, And the highwayman came riding Riding riding The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn door. He'd a French cocked hat on his forehead, and a bunch of lace at his chin; He'd a coat of the claret velvet, and breeches of fine doe-skin. They fitted with never a wrinkle; his boots were up to his thigh! And he rode with a jeweled twinkle His rapier hilt a-twinkle His pistol butts a-twinkle, under the jeweled sky. Over the cobbles he clattered and clashed in the dark inn-yard, He tapped with his whip on the shutters, but all was locked and barred, He whistled a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there But the landlord's black-eyed daughter Bess, the landlord's daughter Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair.
  8. 8. Dark in the dark old inn-yard a stable-wicket creaked Where Tim, the ostler listened--his face was white and peaked His eyes were hollows of madness, his hair like mouldy hay, But he loved the landlord's daughter The landlord's black-eyed daughter; Dumb as a dog he listened, and he heard the robber say: "One kiss, my bonny sweetheart; I'm after a prize tonight, But I shall be back with the yellow gold before the morning light. Yet if they press me sharply, and harry me through the day, Then look for me by moonlight, Watch for me by moonlight, I'll come to thee by moonlight, though hell should bar the way." He stood upright in the stirrups; he scarce could reach her hand, But she loosened her hair in the casement! His face burnt like a brand As the sweet black waves of perfume came tumbling o'er his breast, Then he kissed its waves in the moonlight (O sweet black waves in the moonlight!), And he tugged at his reins in the moonlight, and galloped away to the west.
  9. 9. He did not come in the dawning; he did not come at noon. And out of the tawny sunset, before the rise of the moon, When the road was a gypsy's ribbon over the purple moor, The redcoat troops came marching Marching marching King George's men came marching, up to the old inn-door. They said no word to the landlord; they drank his ale instead, But they gagged his daughter and bound her to the foot of her narrow bed. Two of them knelt at her casement, with muskets by their side; There was Death at every window, And Hell at one dark window, For Bess could see, through her casement, the road that he would ride. They had bound her up at attention, with many a sniggering jest! They had tied a rifle beside her, with the barrel beneath her breast! "Now keep good watch!" and they kissed her. She heard the dead man say, "Look for me by moonlight, Watch for me by moonlight, I'll come to thee by moonlight, though Hell should bar the way."
  10. 10. She twisted her hands behind her, but all the knots held good! She writhed her hands till her fingers were wet with sweat or blood! They stretched and strained in the darkness, and the hours crawled by like years, Till, on the stroke of midnight, Cold on the stroke of midnight, The tip of one finger touched it! The trigger at least was hers! The tip of one finger touched it, she strove no more for the rest; Up, she stood up at attention, with the barrel beneath her breast. She would not risk their hearing, she would not strive again, For the road lay bare in the moonlight, Blank and bare in the moonlight, And the blood in her veins, in the moonlight, throbbed to her love's refrain. Tlot tlot, tlot tlot! Had they heard it? The horse-hooves, ringing clear; Tlot tlot, tlot tlot, in the distance! Were they deaf that they did not hear? Down the ribbon of moonlight, over the brow of the hill, The highwayman came riding Riding riding The redcoats looked to their priming! She stood up straight and still.
  11. 11. Tlot tlot, in the frosty silence! Tlot tlot, in the echoing night! Nearer he came and nearer! Her face was like a light! Her eyes grew wide for a moment, she drew one last deep breath, Then her finger moved in the moonlight Her musket shattered the moonlight Shattered her breast in the moonlight and warned him with her death. He turned, he spurred to the West; he did not know who stood Bowed, with her head o'er the casement, drenched in her own red blood! Not till the dawn did he hear it, and his face grew grey to hear How Bess, the landlord's daughter, The landlord's black-eyed daughter, Had watched for her love in the moonlight, and died in the darkness there. Back, he spurred like a madman, shrieking a curse to the sky, With the white road smoking behind him and his rapier brandished high! Blood-red were his spurs in the golden noon, wine-red was his velvet coat When they shot him down in the highway, Down like a dog in the highway, And he lay in his blood in the highway, with the bunch of lace at his throat.
  12. 12. And still on a winter's night, they say, when the wind is in the trees, When the moon is a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, When the road is a gypsy's ribbon looping the purple moor, The highwayman comes riding Riding riding The highwayman comes riding, up to the old inn-door. Over the cobbles he clatters and clangs in the dark inn-yard, He taps with his whip on the shutters, but all is locked and barred, He whistles a tune to the window, and who should be waiting there But the landlord's black-eyed daughter Bess, the landlord's daughter Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair
  13. 13. SOMEBODY WANTED BUT SO ______________________ (name of character) WANTED ______________, BUT __________________, SO ___________________ . Repeat as needed
  14. 14. How does the poem’s form contribute to its meaning?
  15. 15. structure = characteristics of the poetic form (what it looks like / sounds like)
  16. 16. structure = EXAMPLE Does it have a rhyme scheme? Is there a meter? Does the poet use repetition?
  17. 17. stanza = section of a poem (like a paragraph)
  18. 18. meter = regular rhythm of a poem (like a drum beat); based on stressed and unstressed syllables
  19. 19. narrative poem = poem that tells a story
  20. 20. The wind was a torrent of darkness upon the gusty trees, The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas, The road was a ribbon of moonlight looping the purple moor, And the highwayman came riding Riding riding The highwayman came riding, up to the old inn door. In the first stanza, which lines rhyme? A A B B C
  21. 21. He'd a French cocked hat on his forehead, and a bunch of lace at his chin; He'd a coat of the claret velvet, and breeches of fine doe-skin. They fitted with never a wrinkle; his boots were up to his thigh! And he rode with a jeweled twinkle His rapier hilt a-twinkle His pistol butts a-twinkle, under the jeweled sky. In the second stanza, which lines rhyme? D D E E F
  22. 22. Label the rhyme scheme for the rest of the poem. How does the rhyme scheme effect your experience as a reader? HINT: Start with F
  23. 23. Photo by Luz Adriana Villa A. - Creative Commons Attribution License http://www.flickr.com/photos/11599314@N00 Created with Haiku Deck “STAY GOLD, PONYBOY. STAY GOLD.”
  24. 24. Changes the literal meaning. Includes symbol, metaphor, simile, personification Example “Stay gold, Ponyboy. Stay gold.” Gold is a color and it symbolizes ???
  25. 25. Photo by @Doug88888 - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/29468339@N02 Created with Haiku Deck SIMILE How public—like a frog!
  26. 26. compares two unlike things using like, as, or resembles Example “How public—like a frog!” SIMILE How public—like a frog!
  27. 27. Photo by Alan Cleaver - Creative Commons Attribution License http://www.flickr.com/photos/11121568@N06 Created with Haiku Deck
  28. 28. compares two unlike things (without a word such as like) Example That the powerful play goes on and you may contribute a verse.
  29. 29. Photo by Edgar Barany - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/40579921@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  30. 30. when an object or thing represents an idea Example I wandered lonely as a cloud The color gold and sunsets in The Outsiders
  31. 31. Photo by Great Beyond - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/26104563@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  32. 32. when an object or animal has human-like traits Example I saw a crowd, a host of daffodils
  33. 33. The moon was a ghostly galleon tossed upon cloudy seas (l. 2) Draw a Picture: • Simile or Metaphor? • What is being compared? • What does it mean?
  34. 34. The road was a ribbon of moonlight looping the purple moor (l. 3) Draw a Picture: • Simile or Metaphor? • What is being compared? • What does it mean?
  35. 35. SYMBOL Bess, the landlord's daughter Plaiting a dark red love-knot into her long black hair (l. 16) Blood-red were his spurs in the golden noon, wine-red was his velvet coat (l. 86) THE COLOR RED • What does the color red mean to you? • What might it SYMBOLIZE in the poem?
  36. 36. Topics Themes = Message or Truth about life (Choose 1) • I think the author message may be… • Maybe the author is trying to say… • People need to… • Life is like this when… • love • betrayal • death • hope / despair • •
  37. 37. The Highwayman Video
  38. 38. What did you observe in the film? • I noticed • I saw • I observed
  39. 39. Compare: • One similarity between the poem and the film is… • One difference between the poem and the film is… • Overall, I prefer _____ because…
  40. 40. Highwayman Music Video • “Highwayman” performed by Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, and Kris Kristofferson
  41. 41. Highwayman Music Video • How is this perspective similar to / different than “The Highwayman” by Alfred Noyes?
  42. 42. Highwayman Music Video • How are the song and poem similar? How are they different?
  43. 43. “Annabel Lee” by Edgar Allen Poe
  44. 44. READ AND REREAD • WHAT DO YOU NOTICE?
  45. 45. READ AND REREAD • WHAT QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE?
  46. 46. READ AND REREAD • WHAT IS YOUR GOLDEN LINE?
  47. 47. READ AND REREAD • WHAT ELSE DO YOU NOTICE?
  48. 48. ballad – from medieval times – meant to be heard (sung or spoken) – usually 4-line stanzas with rhyme scheme – usually dramatic or tragic (sometimes comedic)
  49. 49. Photo by Kathy Cassidy - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/57634636@N00 Created with Haiku Deck • What rhymes do you see in “Annabel Lee”? • Write some words that rhyme. • Label them as end, internal, or near rhymes.
  50. 50. Photo by Lee Ann L. - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License http://www.flickr.com/photos/92854641@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  51. 51. a purposeful exaggeration to make a specific point Example The speaker exaggerates about…
  52. 52. Photo by Leo Reynolds - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/49968232@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  53. 53. repetition of the same consonant sound for poetic effect Example We strike straight. We sing sin. The s sound works because…
  54. 54. Photo by Very Quiet - Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/35051723@N05 Created with Haiku Deck
  55. 55. words or phrases that sound like what they describe MORE EXAMPLES
  56. 56. Photo by Sergiu Bacioiu - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial License http://www.flickr.com/photos/31191642@N05 Created with Haiku Deck
  57. 57. sounds, words, and phrases repeated on purpose in order to create rhythm and emphasize important ideas Example What repeats in “Annabel Lee”?
  58. 58. More Poetic Terms
  59. 59. Photo by TheNickster - Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/49503073847@N01 Created with Haiku Deck
  60. 60. description that appeals to the five senses Example “Over the cobbles he clatters and clangs in the dark inn-yard…” What sense(s) are described?
  61. 61. Photo by nathanrdavis - Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/55554587@N02 Created with Haiku Deck
  62. 62. an emotional association or feeling that comes with a word; may be positive or negative Example Which synonyms for hot are positive? Which are negative? What other synonyms can you think of?
  63. 63. Photo by David Glover - Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License http://www.flickr.com/photos/99021790@N00 Created with Haiku Deck
  64. 64. literal or dictionary definition of a word Example Same denotation but different connotations: -skinny -slender -slim -thin -scrawny
  65. 65. Topics Themes = Message or Truth about life (Choose 1) • I think the author message may be… • Maybe the author is trying to say… • People need to… • Life is like this when… • love • betrayal • death • hope / despair • •

×