Feminist black theatre

760 views

Published on

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
760
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
43
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Women liberation movement is part of the political movement that was born in the 1960s during the second wave of feminism. The movement emphasized on ‘sisterhood’, the sameness of women collectively oppressed by men. In urging women to recognise their universal oppression, the movement advocated self definition. However, it tend to overlook the historically determined material conditions of gender, race, class & sexuality. As such, the later phase of the movement was characterised by a breaking up, a fragmentation of working-class women, women of ethnic backgrounds of all classes, lesbians, etc, and they sought to identify their different experiences of oppression which the white, middle-class, heterosexual Movement had overlook.\n
  • Women liberation movement is part of the political movement that was born in the 1960s during the second wave of feminism. The movement emphasized on ‘sisterhood’, the sameness of women collectively oppressed by men. In urging women to recognise their universal oppression, the movement advocated self definition. However, it tend to overlook the historically determined material conditions of gender, race, class & sexuality. As such, the later phase of the movement was characterised by a breaking up, a fragmentation of working-class women, women of ethnic backgrounds of all classes, lesbians, etc, and they sought to identify their different experiences of oppression which the white, middle-class, heterosexual Movement had overlook.\n
  • Women liberation movement is part of the political movement that was born in the 1960s during the second wave of feminism. The movement emphasized on ‘sisterhood’, the sameness of women collectively oppressed by men. In urging women to recognise their universal oppression, the movement advocated self definition. However, it tend to overlook the historically determined material conditions of gender, race, class & sexuality. As such, the later phase of the movement was characterised by a breaking up, a fragmentation of working-class women, women of ethnic backgrounds of all classes, lesbians, etc, and they sought to identify their different experiences of oppression which the white, middle-class, heterosexual Movement had overlook.\n
  • Women liberation movement is part of the political movement that was born in the 1960s during the second wave of feminism. The movement emphasized on ‘sisterhood’, the sameness of women collectively oppressed by men. In urging women to recognise their universal oppression, the movement advocated self definition. However, it tend to overlook the historically determined material conditions of gender, race, class & sexuality. As such, the later phase of the movement was characterised by a breaking up, a fragmentation of working-class women, women of ethnic backgrounds of all classes, lesbians, etc, and they sought to identify their different experiences of oppression which the white, middle-class, heterosexual Movement had overlook.\n
  • Women liberation movement is part of the political movement that was born in the 1960s during the second wave of feminism. The movement emphasized on ‘sisterhood’, the sameness of women collectively oppressed by men. In urging women to recognise their universal oppression, the movement advocated self definition. However, it tend to overlook the historically determined material conditions of gender, race, class & sexuality. As such, the later phase of the movement was characterised by a breaking up, a fragmentation of working-class women, women of ethnic backgrounds of all classes, lesbians, etc, and they sought to identify their different experiences of oppression which the white, middle-class, heterosexual Movement had overlook.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • Feminist theatre of the 1970s was dominated by the white, middle-class women, and was not representative of (for eg) working-class white women or black women from any class background. The white ‘centre’ of feminist theatre has been rethought by some white feminist theatre practitioners in the 1980s, while black women have also shaped feminist theatre by creating their own ‘spaces’ to write about the history of their oppressions into theatrical contexts.\n\nThe white feminists created their own performance groups, space or networks. However, they found it difficult to break down class and racial barriers in order to engage creatively with staging difference. Such attempts have not always been successful. An example of this is the Magdalena 1986 project. Protests were made about the possible elitism of the theatre the women were making and performing in terms of class & race. Some egs of issues raised: few women of colour who took part in the proceedings, and why there weren't any black women performers (although explained that they were invited but were unable to accept the invitation). No matter what, charges of racial prejudice remained.\n
  • Feminist theatre of the 1970s was dominated by the white, middle-class women, and was not representative of (for eg) working-class white women or black women from any class background. The white ‘centre’ of feminist theatre has been rethought by some white feminist theatre practitioners in the 1980s, while black women have also shaped feminist theatre by creating their own ‘spaces’ to write about the history of their oppressions into theatrical contexts.\n\nThe white feminists created their own performance groups, space or networks. However, they found it difficult to break down class and racial barriers in order to engage creatively with staging difference. Such attempts have not always been successful. An example of this is the Magdalena 1986 project. Protests were made about the possible elitism of the theatre the women were making and performing in terms of class & race. Some egs of issues raised: few women of colour who took part in the proceedings, and why there weren't any black women performers (although explained that they were invited but were unable to accept the invitation). No matter what, charges of racial prejudice remained.\n
  • Feminist theatre of the 1970s was dominated by the white, middle-class women, and was not representative of (for eg) working-class white women or black women from any class background. The white ‘centre’ of feminist theatre has been rethought by some white feminist theatre practitioners in the 1980s, while black women have also shaped feminist theatre by creating their own ‘spaces’ to write about the history of their oppressions into theatrical contexts.\n\nThe white feminists created their own performance groups, space or networks. However, they found it difficult to break down class and racial barriers in order to engage creatively with staging difference. Such attempts have not always been successful. An example of this is the Magdalena 1986 project. Protests were made about the possible elitism of the theatre the women were making and performing in terms of class & race. Some egs of issues raised: few women of colour who took part in the proceedings, and why there weren't any black women performers (although explained that they were invited but were unable to accept the invitation). No matter what, charges of racial prejudice remained.\n
  • In the 1986 project, the african women’s inability to accept the invitation was mainly due to financial. Also, at that time, the project just started and they lacked contacts with women in Africa. However, in 1987, just a year after, they were able to host a performance of ‘You strike the women, You strike the rock’ by the South African women’s group (the Visiwe Players). The company was already touring Britain, therefore a booking was financially viable. The issue on networking with African women was addressed, proven with the project holding a event in Zimbabwe in 1994. The Magdalena is an example to show how feminist networks or companies, seeking to engage Black women in their white spaces have had to take active steps to change the all-white composition of their members by implementing policy changes which would positively discriminate in the favour of the Black women. 2 groups which have worked in this way are Women’s Theatre Group & Women and Theatre Company.\n\n\n
  • In the 1986 project, the african women’s inability to accept the invitation was mainly due to financial. Also, at that time, the project just started and they lacked contacts with women in Africa. However, in 1987, just a year after, they were able to host a performance of ‘You strike the women, You strike the rock’ by the South African women’s group (the Visiwe Players). The company was already touring Britain, therefore a booking was financially viable. The issue on networking with African women was addressed, proven with the project holding a event in Zimbabwe in 1994. The Magdalena is an example to show how feminist networks or companies, seeking to engage Black women in their white spaces have had to take active steps to change the all-white composition of their members by implementing policy changes which would positively discriminate in the favour of the Black women. 2 groups which have worked in this way are Women’s Theatre Group & Women and Theatre Company.\n\n\n
  • In the 1986 project, the african women’s inability to accept the invitation was mainly due to financial. Also, at that time, the project just started and they lacked contacts with women in Africa. However, in 1987, just a year after, they were able to host a performance of ‘You strike the women, You strike the rock’ by the South African women’s group (the Visiwe Players). The company was already touring Britain, therefore a booking was financially viable. The issue on networking with African women was addressed, proven with the project holding a event in Zimbabwe in 1994. The Magdalena is an example to show how feminist networks or companies, seeking to engage Black women in their white spaces have had to take active steps to change the all-white composition of their members by implementing policy changes which would positively discriminate in the favour of the Black women. 2 groups which have worked in this way are Women’s Theatre Group & Women and Theatre Company.\n\n\n
  • In the 1986 project, the african women’s inability to accept the invitation was mainly due to financial. Also, at that time, the project just started and they lacked contacts with women in Africa. However, in 1987, just a year after, they were able to host a performance of ‘You strike the women, You strike the rock’ by the South African women’s group (the Visiwe Players). The company was already touring Britain, therefore a booking was financially viable. The issue on networking with African women was addressed, proven with the project holding a event in Zimbabwe in 1994. The Magdalena is an example to show how feminist networks or companies, seeking to engage Black women in their white spaces have had to take active steps to change the all-white composition of their members by implementing policy changes which would positively discriminate in the favour of the Black women. 2 groups which have worked in this way are Women’s Theatre Group & Women and Theatre Company.\n\n\n
  • In the 1986 project, the african women’s inability to accept the invitation was mainly due to financial. Also, at that time, the project just started and they lacked contacts with women in Africa. However, in 1987, just a year after, they were able to host a performance of ‘You strike the women, You strike the rock’ by the South African women’s group (the Visiwe Players). The company was already touring Britain, therefore a booking was financially viable. The issue on networking with African women was addressed, proven with the project holding a event in Zimbabwe in 1994. The Magdalena is an example to show how feminist networks or companies, seeking to engage Black women in their white spaces have had to take active steps to change the all-white composition of their members by implementing policy changes which would positively discriminate in the favour of the Black women. 2 groups which have worked in this way are Women’s Theatre Group & Women and Theatre Company.\n\n\n
  • In the 1986 project, the african women’s inability to accept the invitation was mainly due to financial. Also, at that time, the project just started and they lacked contacts with women in Africa. However, in 1987, just a year after, they were able to host a performance of ‘You strike the women, You strike the rock’ by the South African women’s group (the Visiwe Players). The company was already touring Britain, therefore a booking was financially viable. The issue on networking with African women was addressed, proven with the project holding a event in Zimbabwe in 1994. The Magdalena is an example to show how feminist networks or companies, seeking to engage Black women in their white spaces have had to take active steps to change the all-white composition of their members by implementing policy changes which would positively discriminate in the favour of the Black women. 2 groups which have worked in this way are Women’s Theatre Group & Women and Theatre Company.\n\n\n
  • In the 1986 project, the african women’s inability to accept the invitation was mainly due to financial. Also, at that time, the project just started and they lacked contacts with women in Africa. However, in 1987, just a year after, they were able to host a performance of ‘You strike the women, You strike the rock’ by the South African women’s group (the Visiwe Players). The company was already touring Britain, therefore a booking was financially viable. The issue on networking with African women was addressed, proven with the project holding a event in Zimbabwe in 1994. The Magdalena is an example to show how feminist networks or companies, seeking to engage Black women in their white spaces have had to take active steps to change the all-white composition of their members by implementing policy changes which would positively discriminate in the favour of the Black women. 2 groups which have worked in this way are Women’s Theatre Group & Women and Theatre Company.\n\n\n
  • Black actresses working in these companies experienced difficulty in negotiating race & gender in their performances. Eg: playing a ‘white’ role.\n
  • Black actresses working in these companies experienced difficulty in negotiating race & gender in their performances. Eg: playing a ‘white’ role.\n
  • Black actresses working in these companies experienced difficulty in negotiating race & gender in their performances. Eg: playing a ‘white’ role.\n
  • Black actresses working in these companies experienced difficulty in negotiating race & gender in their performances. Eg: playing a ‘white’ role.\n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • \n
  • The bonding between Black women is important in their fight against oppression which helps them to define ‘feminism’ on their own terms. This was the aim of the company. They wanted to give an artistic expression to the experience of the Black women past & present. And by reliving their history and struggle in front of their eyes, it can help them define and name their own brand of feminism. Their earlier works were all written by themselves. They focused on work by the Black women, involved very few men and females of other colours. Theatre of the Black women was made by Black women representing themselves and their own perspectives and values. Their inaugural performances: Tiger Teeth Clenched Not to Bite by Bernadine Evaristo, Hey Brown Girl by Patricia Hilairie, and Chameleon by Paulette Randall. All the 3 performances revolved around the theme of being young, Black and female in the white-dominated Britain. In 1986, they worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet and dramatist, Jackie Kay on her first play, Chiaroscuro. The play worked out on music, dance, dialogue and poetry. It tackled not only the question of Black female identity but also focused on the issue of sexuality. In 1987, the company diversified their material, producing The Cripple by Ruth Harris, based on a true story of a Jamaican woman crippled from birth, overcoming her disability; a piece of children’s theatre, Miss Quashi and the Tiger’s Tail by Gabriela and Jean Pearse; and another play by Ruth Harris, The Children.\n\n
  • The bonding between Black women is important in their fight against oppression which helps them to define ‘feminism’ on their own terms. This was the aim of the company. They wanted to give an artistic expression to the experience of the Black women past & present. And by reliving their history and struggle in front of their eyes, it can help them define and name their own brand of feminism. Their earlier works were all written by themselves. They focused on work by the Black women, involved very few men and females of other colours. Theatre of the Black women was made by Black women representing themselves and their own perspectives and values. Their inaugural performances: Tiger Teeth Clenched Not to Bite by Bernadine Evaristo, Hey Brown Girl by Patricia Hilairie, and Chameleon by Paulette Randall. All the 3 performances revolved around the theme of being young, Black and female in the white-dominated Britain. In 1986, they worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet and dramatist, Jackie Kay on her first play, Chiaroscuro. The play worked out on music, dance, dialogue and poetry. It tackled not only the question of Black female identity but also focused on the issue of sexuality. In 1987, the company diversified their material, producing The Cripple by Ruth Harris, based on a true story of a Jamaican woman crippled from birth, overcoming her disability; a piece of children’s theatre, Miss Quashi and the Tiger’s Tail by Gabriela and Jean Pearse; and another play by Ruth Harris, The Children.\n\n
  • The bonding between Black women is important in their fight against oppression which helps them to define ‘feminism’ on their own terms. This was the aim of the company. They wanted to give an artistic expression to the experience of the Black women past & present. And by reliving their history and struggle in front of their eyes, it can help them define and name their own brand of feminism. Their earlier works were all written by themselves. They focused on work by the Black women, involved very few men and females of other colours. Theatre of the Black women was made by Black women representing themselves and their own perspectives and values. Their inaugural performances: Tiger Teeth Clenched Not to Bite by Bernadine Evaristo, Hey Brown Girl by Patricia Hilairie, and Chameleon by Paulette Randall. All the 3 performances revolved around the theme of being young, Black and female in the white-dominated Britain. In 1986, they worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet and dramatist, Jackie Kay on her first play, Chiaroscuro. The play worked out on music, dance, dialogue and poetry. It tackled not only the question of Black female identity but also focused on the issue of sexuality. In 1987, the company diversified their material, producing The Cripple by Ruth Harris, based on a true story of a Jamaican woman crippled from birth, overcoming her disability; a piece of children’s theatre, Miss Quashi and the Tiger’s Tail by Gabriela and Jean Pearse; and another play by Ruth Harris, The Children.\n\n
  • The bonding between Black women is important in their fight against oppression which helps them to define ‘feminism’ on their own terms. This was the aim of the company. They wanted to give an artistic expression to the experience of the Black women past & present. And by reliving their history and struggle in front of their eyes, it can help them define and name their own brand of feminism. Their earlier works were all written by themselves. They focused on work by the Black women, involved very few men and females of other colours. Theatre of the Black women was made by Black women representing themselves and their own perspectives and values. Their inaugural performances: Tiger Teeth Clenched Not to Bite by Bernadine Evaristo, Hey Brown Girl by Patricia Hilairie, and Chameleon by Paulette Randall. All the 3 performances revolved around the theme of being young, Black and female in the white-dominated Britain. In 1986, they worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet and dramatist, Jackie Kay on her first play, Chiaroscuro. The play worked out on music, dance, dialogue and poetry. It tackled not only the question of Black female identity but also focused on the issue of sexuality. In 1987, the company diversified their material, producing The Cripple by Ruth Harris, based on a true story of a Jamaican woman crippled from birth, overcoming her disability; a piece of children’s theatre, Miss Quashi and the Tiger’s Tail by Gabriela and Jean Pearse; and another play by Ruth Harris, The Children.\n\n
  • The bonding between Black women is important in their fight against oppression which helps them to define ‘feminism’ on their own terms. This was the aim of the company. They wanted to give an artistic expression to the experience of the Black women past & present. And by reliving their history and struggle in front of their eyes, it can help them define and name their own brand of feminism. Their earlier works were all written by themselves. They focused on work by the Black women, involved very few men and females of other colours. Theatre of the Black women was made by Black women representing themselves and their own perspectives and values. Their inaugural performances: Tiger Teeth Clenched Not to Bite by Bernadine Evaristo, Hey Brown Girl by Patricia Hilairie, and Chameleon by Paulette Randall. All the 3 performances revolved around the theme of being young, Black and female in the white-dominated Britain. In 1986, they worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet and dramatist, Jackie Kay on her first play, Chiaroscuro. The play worked out on music, dance, dialogue and poetry. It tackled not only the question of Black female identity but also focused on the issue of sexuality. In 1987, the company diversified their material, producing The Cripple by Ruth Harris, based on a true story of a Jamaican woman crippled from birth, overcoming her disability; a piece of children’s theatre, Miss Quashi and the Tiger’s Tail by Gabriela and Jean Pearse; and another play by Ruth Harris, The Children.\n\n
  • The bonding between Black women is important in their fight against oppression which helps them to define ‘feminism’ on their own terms. This was the aim of the company. They wanted to give an artistic expression to the experience of the Black women past & present. And by reliving their history and struggle in front of their eyes, it can help them define and name their own brand of feminism. Their earlier works were all written by themselves. They focused on work by the Black women, involved very few men and females of other colours. Theatre of the Black women was made by Black women representing themselves and their own perspectives and values. Their inaugural performances: Tiger Teeth Clenched Not to Bite by Bernadine Evaristo, Hey Brown Girl by Patricia Hilairie, and Chameleon by Paulette Randall. All the 3 performances revolved around the theme of being young, Black and female in the white-dominated Britain. In 1986, they worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet and dramatist, Jackie Kay on her first play, Chiaroscuro. The play worked out on music, dance, dialogue and poetry. It tackled not only the question of Black female identity but also focused on the issue of sexuality. In 1987, the company diversified their material, producing The Cripple by Ruth Harris, based on a true story of a Jamaican woman crippled from birth, overcoming her disability; a piece of children’s theatre, Miss Quashi and the Tiger’s Tail by Gabriela and Jean Pearse; and another play by Ruth Harris, The Children.\n\n
  • \n
  • Feminist black theatre

    1. 1. by Hailwa Moree
    2. 2. Feminist Theatre by Hailwa Moree
    3. 3. Feminist TheatreTh eatre of Black Women by Hailwa Moree
    4. 4. ContentsWomen’s Liberation MovementPlight of Black WomenThe Magdalena ProjectPolicy ChangesTheatre of Black Women
    5. 5. Women’s Liberation Movement
    6. 6. Political movement born in the 1960s
    7. 7. Political movement born in the 1960sEmphasised on ‘sisterhood’: the ‘sameness’ ofwomen collectively oppressed by men.
    8. 8. Political movement born in the 1960sEmphasised on ‘sisterhood’: the ‘sameness’ ofwomen collectively oppressed by men.Overlook the historically determined materialconditions of gender, race, class & sexuality
    9. 9. Political movement born in the 1960sEmphasised on ‘sisterhood’: the ‘sameness’ ofwomen collectively oppressed by men.Overlook the historically determined materialconditions of gender, race, class & sexualityLater phase of the movement sought to identifytheir different experiences of oppression.
    10. 10. “ Black women wrote about how they had been silenced, and challenged the racist assumptions behind the almost universally accepted white feminist positions on violence against women, the family and reproductive rights...” (Harriss K, 1989)
    11. 11. Black Women
    12. 12. Black WomenExperience of oppression was triply grounded: gender,class & race.
    13. 13. Black WomenExperience of oppression was triply grounded: gender,class & race.Throughout the 1980s, the critical voices of Black womenin America & Britain established a critique of whitefeminist theories White feminists address racism of the Women’s Movement.
    14. 14. White ‘Spaces’: Black Women
    15. 15. White ‘Spaces’: Black WomenFeminist theatre of the 1970s dominated by white, middle-class women.
    16. 16. White ‘Spaces’: Black WomenFeminist theatre of the 1970s dominated by white, middle-class women.White feminists created their own performance groups,space or networks but had difficulties breaking down class& racial barriers.
    17. 17. White ‘Spaces’: Black WomenFeminist theatre of the 1970s dominated by white, middle-class women.White feminists created their own performance groups,space or networks but had difficulties breaking down class& racial barriers. In the Magdalena 1986 project, protests were made about the possible elitism of the theatre.
    18. 18. Founded in Wales in 1986.
    19. 19. Founded in Wales in 1986.International network of women in contemporary theatre
    20. 20. Founded in Wales in 1986.International network of women in contemporary theatreProvides a platform for women’s performance work, a forum for criticaldiscussion & a source of support, inspiration & performance training.
    21. 21. Founded in Wales in 1986.International network of women in contemporary theatreProvides a platform for women’s performance work, a forum for criticaldiscussion & a source of support, inspiration & performance training.African women were unable to accept the invitation in 1986 was due tofinancial constraints, and lack of contacts.
    22. 22. Founded in Wales in 1986.International network of women in contemporary theatreProvides a platform for women’s performance work, a forum for criticaldiscussion & a source of support, inspiration & performance training.African women were unable to accept the invitation in 1986 was due tofinancial constraints, and lack of contacts.Hosted a performance by the South African women’s group (the VisiwePlayers) in 1987
    23. 23. Founded in Wales in 1986.International network of women in contemporary theatreProvides a platform for women’s performance work, a forum for criticaldiscussion & a source of support, inspiration & performance training.African women were unable to accept the invitation in 1986 was due tofinancial constraints, and lack of contacts.Hosted a performance by the South African women’s group (the VisiwePlayers) in 1987Hosted a Magdalena event in Zimbabwe in 1994.
    24. 24. Founded in Wales in 1986.International network of women in contemporary theatreProvides a platform for women’s performance work, a forum for criticaldiscussion & a source of support, inspiration & performance training.African women were unable to accept the invitation in 1986 was due tofinancial constraints, and lack of contacts.Hosted a performance by the South African women’s group (the VisiwePlayers) in 1987Hosted a Magdalena event in Zimbabwe in 1994.An example to show how feminist networks or companies seek toengage Black women in their white ‘spaces’.
    25. 25. Policy Changes
    26. 26. Policy ChangesSetting up policies was easier than fulfilling them
    27. 27. Policy ChangesSetting up policies was easier than fulfilling themIn 1989, Women’s Theatre Group put up their 1st all-blackperformance but still needed to find ways to maintain theinvolvement in the company other than writing &performing.
    28. 28. Policy ChangesSetting up policies was easier than fulfilling themIn 1989, Women’s Theatre Group put up their 1st all-blackperformance but still needed to find ways to maintain theinvolvement in the company other than writing &performing.Women and Theatre Company tried to move towards amulti-racial performance which meant more than employingBlack actresses.
    29. 29. Policy ChangesSetting up policies was easier than fulfilling themIn 1989, Women’s Theatre Group put up their 1st all-blackperformance but still needed to find ways to maintain theinvolvement in the company other than writing &performing.Women and Theatre Company tried to move towards amulti-racial performance which meant more than employingBlack actresses.Black actresses working in these companies experienceddifficulty in negotiating race & gender in their performances.
    30. 30. Theatre of Black Women
    31. 31. Theatre of Black Womenfounded by Bernadine Evaristo, Patricia Hilaire & Paulette Randall
    32. 32. Theatre of Black Womenfounded by Bernadine Evaristo, Patricia Hilaire & Paulette Randall 1982 - 1988
    33. 33. Th e Fo u n de rsBernadine Paulette Randall Evaristo
    34. 34. Aim: Give an artistic expression to the experience of the Blackwomen past & present.
    35. 35. Aim: Give an artistic expression to the experience of the Blackwomen past & present.A feminist theatre company because the founders definedthemselves as Black feminists and focuses on Black women’s work.
    36. 36. Aim: Give an artistic expression to the experience of the Blackwomen past & present.A feminist theatre company because the founders definedthemselves as Black feminists and focuses on Black women’s work.Their inaugural production in 1982 was a triple-bill of a onewoman shows which shared the common theme of being young,Black and female in Britain.
    37. 37. Aim: Give an artistic expression to the experience of the Blackwomen past & present.A feminist theatre company because the founders definedthemselves as Black feminists and focuses on Black women’s work.Their inaugural production in 1982 was a triple-bill of a onewoman shows which shared the common theme of being young,Black and female in Britain.In 1986, worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet anddramatist Jackie Kay on Chiaroscuro.
    38. 38. Aim: Give an artistic expression to the experience of the Blackwomen past & present.A feminist theatre company because the founders definedthemselves as Black feminists and focuses on Black women’s work.Their inaugural production in 1982 was a triple-bill of a onewoman shows which shared the common theme of being young,Black and female in Britain.In 1986, worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet anddramatist Jackie Kay on Chiaroscuro.Diversified their material in 1987.
    39. 39. Aim: Give an artistic expression to the experience of the Blackwomen past & present.A feminist theatre company because the founders definedthemselves as Black feminists and focuses on Black women’s work.Their inaugural production in 1982 was a triple-bill of a onewoman shows which shared the common theme of being young,Black and female in Britain.In 1986, worked with a Scottish-Nigerian lesbian poet anddramatist Jackie Kay on Chiaroscuro.Diversified their material in 1987.Disbanded in 1988 due to hard financial times.
    40. 40. Thank You

    ×