Extension 2.0 Basics

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An discussion of Web 2.0 given to Extension Youth Development staff at their staff development Conference, Youth and U, Feb 3, 2009.

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Extension 2.0 Basics

  1. 1. Web 2.0 Basics For Youth Development Staff Amy Baker Program Resource Director UM Extension
  2. 3. Technology may be key <ul><li>93% of youth (12-17) are online every day (Pew, 2007) </li></ul><ul><li>Connecting with and relating to youth in ways they prefer may be key to keeping them involved and interested. </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2.0 tools can also increase efficiency and reduce costs. </li></ul>
  3. 4. Topics <ul><li>Blogs </li></ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>RSS (Feeds) </li></ul><ul><li>Podcasts </li></ul><ul><li>Photo and Video Sharing </li></ul><ul><li>Messaging </li></ul><ul><li>Social Networking </li></ul>
  4. 5. Blogs: How you can use them <ul><li>Keep the community informed on what’s going on in your program. </li></ul><ul><li>Share expertise related to your field. </li></ul><ul><li>Build community among staff, volunteers, interns, etc. </li></ul>
  5. 6. Blogs: Program Examples
  6. 7. Blogs: Program Examples
  7. 8. Blogs: What you can do <ul><li>Ask your audience if they read any blogs, and if so, which ones and what do they like about them. </li></ul><ul><li>Read and participate in blogs by colleagues </li></ul>
  8. 9. Wikis: How you can use them <ul><li>Wikis are good for almost any collaborative tasks. </li></ul><ul><li>Create a Best Practices site for organizing youth field days </li></ul><ul><li>Create an orientation manual for new staff or volunteers </li></ul>
  9. 10. Wiki: Example
  10. 11. Wiki: What you can do <ul><li>Use a wiki next time you are starting a collaborative, online document. </li></ul><ul><li>Be part of the solution when you find something that could be corrected on any wiki </li></ul>
  11. 12. RSS (Feeds): How you can use them <ul><li>Feeds are primarily meant as a way to easily stay up-to-date </li></ul><ul><li>Things that often have feeds: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>News sites </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blogs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wikis </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Search results </li></ul></ul>
  12. 13. RSS (Feeds): What you can do <ul><li>Subscribe to feeds to stay on top of news, blogs, grants opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of any sites you contribute to (blogs, wikis) that have RSS so you can encourage your audience/stakeholders to subscribe. </li></ul>
  13. 14. Podcasts: How you can use them <ul><li>Program marketing: record a spot that includes participant testimonials </li></ul><ul><li>Increase engagement by podcasting a presentation. This allows absent participants, parents, and stakeholders to all be part of the conversation </li></ul>
  14. 15. Podcasts: What you can do <ul><li>Subscribe to relevant podcasts in your field </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage your audience to subscribe to a podcast of interest to them (or play it for them) to enrich discussions on a topic </li></ul>
  15. 16. Images and Video Sharing: How you can use <ul><li>Really excellent for program marketing and recruitment </li></ul>
  16. 17. Image and Video Sharing: What you can do <ul><li>Upload photos to a site that is shareable to team members (Smug mug, Flickr) </li></ul><ul><li>If you have a video camera, start recording some of your best events to increase interest by stakeholders and potential participants </li></ul>
  17. 18. Messaging: How you can use <ul><li>Communication with youth: many are more responsive to texting </li></ul><ul><li>Communication with team: an instant message can be less intrusive than a phone call </li></ul>
  18. 19. Messaging: Examples <ul><li>Used in recruiting for U of M with high schoolers </li></ul><ul><li>HealthPartners says it is the #1 way patients request appointment reminders and test results </li></ul>
  19. 20. Messaging: What you can do <ul><li>Have a youth show you how to do it on your phone </li></ul><ul><li>On sign-up forms, add a question about whether participants would like to receive texts and if yes, what is cell # </li></ul>
  20. 21. Social Networking: How you can use <ul><li>Establish a simple programmatic presence for communications and marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Stay in touch with current and past program participants </li></ul>
  21. 22. Social Networking: What you can do <ul><li>Become familiar with the terms of social networking: MySpace, Facebook, friending, status, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Create an account for yourself, just to see for yourself </li></ul>
  22. 23. Youth Online <ul><li>Be aware of which tools are better suited when participant privacy is an issue </li></ul><ul><li>Become familiar with each tool’s access restrictions for creating private communities </li></ul><ul><li>Be aware of the “new” digital divide—some youth have access to the web only at school and some sites may be blocked </li></ul>
  23. 24. Sources <ul><li>Youth Impact, A LEARNS Resource, Volume 2 http://www.nationalserviceresources.org/files/Youth-Impact-vol-2.pdf </li></ul><ul><li>“ Teen Content Creators” Pew Internet and American Life Project http://pewresearch.org/pubs/670/teen-content-creators </li></ul><ul><li>Extension 2.0 Curriculum </li></ul>

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