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Android app fundamentals

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android fundamentals workshop
made by me and Google Student Club Al-Azhar University
It lasted 4 days

Published in: Software
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Android app fundamentals

  1. 1. Android Workshop Google STUDENT CLUB AL-AZHAR UNIVERSITY
  2. 2. Session one ANDROID APP FUNDAMENTALS
  3. 3. Android Architecture  Run on top of Linux.  Dalvik Virtual Machine optimized for mobile devices.  Integrated browser based on WebKit engine.  Optimized graphics with OpenGL ES.  SQLite database for structured data storage.
  4. 4. Application Fundamentals  Applications are written in the Java programming language.  Compiled into Android package file (.apk).  Each application run in its own sandbox and Linus process.  Applications consist of components, a manifest file and resources.  Components: Activities Services Content providers Broadcast receivers
  5. 5. Activities  An activity represents a single screen with a user interface.  Most applications contain multiple activities.  When a new activity starts, it is pushed onto the back stack.  User interface can be built with XML or in Java.
  6. 6. Services  Service perform long-running operations in the background.  Dose not contain a user interface.  Useful for things like network operations, playing music, etc.  Runs independently of the component that created it.  Can be bound to by other application components, if allowed.
  7. 7. Content Providers  Used to store and retrieve data and make it accessible to all applications.  Are the only way to share data across applications.  Exposes a public URL that uniquely identifies its data set.  Data is exposed as a simple table on a database model.  Android contains many providers for things like contacts, media, etc
  8. 8. Broadcast Receivers  A component that responds to system-wide broadcast announcements.  Example include when the screen turns of, the battery is low, etc.  Applications can also initiate their own broadcasts.  Broadcast receivers contain no user interface.  They can creat status bar notifications to alert the user.
  9. 9. Android Manifest File  Application must have an AndroidManifest.xml file in its root directory  Presents information about the application to Android system.  Describes the components used in application.  Declares the permissions required to run the application.  Declares the minimum Android API level that application requires.
  10. 10. Project Structure
  11. 11. Session Two ANDROID APP FUNDAMENTALS PART TWO
  12. 12. Project Structure
  13. 13. Android Manifest File  Application must have an AndroidManifest.xml file in its root directory  Presents information about the application to Android system.  Describes the components used in application.  Declares the permissions required to run the application.  Declares the minimum Android API level that application requires.
  14. 14. Activities  An activity represents a single screen with a user interface.  Most applications contain multiple activities.  When a new activity starts, it is pushed onto the back stack.  User interface can be built with XML or in Java.
  15. 15. Session Three ANDROID APP FUNDAMENTALS PART THREE
  16. 16. Activity Life Cycle
  17. 17. Intent  Intent is a messaging object you can use to request an action from another app component. Although intents facilitate communication between components in several ways  It’s a way to Activate component : • To start an activity • To start a service • To deliver a broadcast:  There are two types of intents: Explicit Intent, Implicit Intent
  18. 18. Building an Intent  The primary information contained in an Intent is the following: • Component name • Action • Data • Category  intent can carry additional information: • Extras • Flags
  19. 19. Explicit Intent  Explicit intents specify the component to start by name (the fully-qualified class name). You'll typically use an explicit intent to start a component in your own app, because you know the class name of the activity or service you want to start. For example, start a new activity in response to a user action or start a service to download a file in the background.
  20. 20. Explicit Intent
  21. 21. Explicit Intent
  22. 22. Implicit Intent  Implicit intents do not name a specific component, but instead declare a general action to perform, which allows a component from another app to handle it. For example, if you want to show the user a location on a map, you can use an implicit intent to request that another capable app show a specified location on a map.
  23. 23. Implicit Intent

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